Valve and Ubisoft may have internal testing teams, but most game studios do not keep a large number of testers on the payroll – instead, they hire outside game testing companies. I don’t know which contract firms they use, but Babble used to be a big one, and UTest/Applause is popular right now. You could start by looking at one of those companies.
ItemForge MMO Shop is looking for levelers and boosters. I will explain and provide everything you need to get started (guide, info, accounts) but it is up to you to learn basics (game mechanics). The more games you learn, the more jobs you will be eligible to get so I suggest learning minimum two. You should know at least one of them quite well already, otherwise you will need to learn it, which is unpaid during the first 6 months of cooperation. Longterm you are expected to improve your skills and knowledge in your free time (staying up to date with patches), but we will pay for your training when a new game is added to the shop. If you prove to be efficient and reliable, it will become a full time job. Duration: - It is a LONG-TERM project. (Note: Don't bother if expect to work 1 day/1 week/1 month) - It is a 5+ days a week job Requirements: - Long term (this job is for years - the game may change, but the players remain the same!) - Responsible & reliable - Ability to read (games change all the time, you need to stay up to date) - STABLE internet + PC able to handle the newest MMO games Offer below is for basic services (require only minimal game knowledge and average skills). If you are a very skilled gamer and can supply premium (top rating) boosts without my help (know-how and accounts) then please send me a list + price of services you can provide (any game, not just the ones we support right now). Always looking for: BOOSTER ($16-24 / day - about $450 a month) for boosting/multiboxing, who is online a lot (minimum 8h+ almost every day) to use 3rd party programs like Multiboxer, you should be tech savy (good at troubleshooting software etc.) You will be doing on demand live boosting (when customer is playing) or perform multibox leveling (which has a flexible schedule). You should have above average skills, good enough game knowledge and at least communicative English. POWER LEVELER ($8-12 / Day - about $250 a month) who can stream for menial jobs like leveling or grinding but also skilled quick jobs (typically x hours). You need a conversational English, above average skills/knowledge and should be online almost every day. You can outsource this job to your non-English speaking friends and earn on being a middle man but you still need a manager who will train them and coordinate the jobs. We also cooperate with teams (e.g. in gaming centers) who can provide many players and/or 24/7 leveling on the same PC (streaming isn't required if gamers are supervised). Power Leveling is all about manually playing online games on customer's account and achieving specific goals within set deadline. Playing manually means 100% by hand, you are not allowed (without my explicit case by case permission) to use or install anything beside the official game client. VPN Tunnel will be provided for you, you can't power level without it. Although many jobs allow you to have a flexible schedule, high availability is desired because sometimes you will have to be able to play during scheduled events like in the party, during specific fixed daily schedule. Only minimal game mechanics knowledge is required to start receiving jobs (100-200h /played). All jobs require you to be online but amount of attention needed varies from job to job, some only require you to play 10% of the time (leecher), others 100% (grind). Rate is calculated for average skill level (not a clicker or a keyboard turner). If you are very efficient and creative, you can complete some (but not all) of the jobs a few times faster or do 2-3 jobs at the same time. This means double or even triple hourly rate but it is very random so you need to be ok with the basic rate, even during jobs that take weeks to complete. Other than that, there is no advancement opportunity, your base rate will never increase (though you may still advance to a Booster). You are expected to play 8h a day, almost every day after you take the job (until you complete it). You will be paid a fixed price for average delivery time (deadlines are very fair), whenever you complete it in 50% or 150% of the time, you will still be paid the same amount (this way efficiency is encouraged). Need all of the following information in your offer (failing to provide a clear answer to any of them will most likely cause your application to be auto-declined): 1. Which position are you applying for, why that one? What kind of tasks do you think you will do? 2. Daily/Weekly availability (how many hours?) 3. Can you play without ping issues on servers located in Europe and America? (try D3 trial and make some levels on BOTH game modes) 4. Preferred long-term daily price (don't waste time asking for more than is offered) 5. PC/Internet specifications (can you stream?) 6. MMO accomplishments and/or gaming experience (only list impressive things that take thousands of hours) 7. Experience in online gaming services industry 8. English level 9. Cover letter (sell yourself!) less more
For example, a large multiplayer online game might have 10,000 different areas that players can explore over several years of play. It would be impossible to test all of those areas manually, every time a new build of the game is created. So instead of doing it manually, an SDET might write a test program that quickly moves the player character to each one of the 10,000 areas for a few seconds each. That’s way faster than a human tester could ever do it manually.
I love playing video games. But I’ve always wanted to know how the characters are made. I already went to college for game design, but because I couldn’t pass this one programming class, I ended up having to change my major. The art classes didn’t really help me much in understanding how to model a character. People have told me I’m pretty damn creative and I’m detail-oriented. I’m also very focused and love to write.
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very helpful article. i personally love breaking games and finding bugs. i just love to find those bugs that the developers/programmers didnt think of being possible or consider happening. just to find one and say “this is a game breaking bug, here is a way you could fix it” makes me happy because it might help keep another player from experiencing that bug and ruining there experience of the game. the mere fact that i sit playing games the first time through enjoying them and then going back and trying to break them for fun kind of qualifies me or places me in the area for QA game tester already but that doesnt mean much as i cant find anywhere to apply for such a job. i know minor programming and can give details on how to fix bugs in a way a programmer might understand better than the regular person testing the game without the knowledge. it’s just saddening for me that i have been searching for about 3 years now for somewhere to apply for this type of job. i truly have a passion for it, even though it’s considered a tedious job at times, i still love it.
Well… All i do is gaming all i mostly ever wanted to do is game and it would be ARWSOME to be in the industry thats if there is one in New Zealand but if there is, i really want to just test game and do reports because i played games with a lot of bugs and i do make reports about them etc… But this is a job i would love to have!!! Sincerely – Harry Wilson McGill
There are many basic skills and abilities that you will need for a career as a video game tester, but probably the most important attribute is a foundational experience with video games. You need to understand the top genres of games, know what makes for a good video game, and grasp the essentials of game play. Knowing video games, however, is just a start.

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Hi Kyler, most game testing jobs don’t require a degree unless they also require some computer programming skills. In high school, I’d recommend taking some computer classes, maybe a programming class, and technical writing. (Or whichever equivalents your school might offer.) Many people move away from their home town to get a job after school, it’s normal to move to a new city where there are more jobs in your field.
Game testing can most definitely lead to other roles in the game industry.  A common complaint that I hear from candidates is that "I can't apply for this job because I haven't worked in the industry for x years" or "I can't get the experience because I can't get the job to start with".  Game testing is one of the few roles in the entire tech industry where you can get a chance without the years of experience behind you.  That being said, just because you are working as a game tester doesn't mean you're going to be a game designing in 5 years.  You need to continue learning new things and focus on skills and technologies that are relevant to the specific area in the industry you'd like to advance into.  Work on side projects with friends or co-workers that will allow you to continue learning new things, continue taking classes to keep your knowledge current.
Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?
Grammar check and spell check your resume. That's a personal pet peeve of mine and many hiring managers I work with.  Someone that applies for a testing role but can't catch spelling or grammatical errors in their own resume is usually passed over.  Writing bug reports is a large part of a game tester's job, and developers and test managers don't have the time to guess what you meant.
Hi my name is Brant and like anyone else here im looking for a game testing job to make big bucks. I'm 11 but before you stop reading this I want to tell you that I would make a great emplouye. A job like this is my dream and I'm not gonna sit around and wait for it to happen. I'm gonna make it happen. I just really hope that you can find the right sight for me to go on to and find a job like this.

Jeez, some of the kids commenting here really can't type well. Either that or they're not good at English. You know it isn't all just fun and games you have to have some English skills because you have to write well detailed reports. You aren't just playing the game you have to analyze it and see where the bugs are or where are the rough patches and then report them to the company. I don't think that this kind of job is for 11 or 13 year olds. I think maybe you should explain that in your article above. This is coming from a 17 year old who has tested and now I make small games with a group of friends. (we're just learning the programs right now). Learning to program is a pain in the butt, but I think rather than small kids looking for jobs in video game testing, I think they should be encouraged to learn more about the games they love. You guys are to young. It bothers me just how many of you believe it is just getting paid to play when it isn't. Well those are just my two cents.


Grammar check and spell check your resume. That's a personal pet peeve of mine and many hiring managers I work with.  Someone that applies for a testing role but can't catch spelling or grammatical errors in their own resume is usually passed over.  Writing bug reports is a large part of a game tester's job, and developers and test managers don't have the time to guess what you meant.
Bethesda Game Studios® is the award-winning development team known around the world for their groundbreaking work on The Elder Scrolls and Fallout series. Creators of the 2006 ‘Game of the Year’, The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion®, the 2008 ‘Game of the Year’, Fallout® 3, the 2011 ‘Game of the Year’, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim®, and most recently, the 2015 ‘Game of the Year’, the record-breaking Fallout® 4. In 2015 the studio also released its first mobile game for iOS and Android devices, Fallout Shelter, which quickly became the top downloaded game in 48 countries and has been downloaded more than 120 million times. Bethesda Game Studios also launched Skyrim VR for PSVR and HTC Vive (PC), and Fallout 4 VR for HTC Vive, as well as Skyrim for Nintendo Switch. Bethesda Game Studios has earned its reputation as one of the industry’s most respected and accomplished game development studios. Bethesda Game Studios has offices in Rockville, Austin, Montreal, and Dallas.
Video game tester jobs. This site and the products and services offered on this site are not associated, affiliated, endorsed, or sponsored by Google, ClickBetter, eBay, Amazon, Yahoo or Bing nor have they been reviewed tested or certified by Google, ClickBetter, Yahoo, eBay, Amazon, or Bing. The typical purchaser does not make any money using this system. GamingJobsOnline.com does not guarantee income or success, and examples shown in this presentation do not represent an indication of future success or earnings. The company declares the information shared is true and accurate. 2018 Gaming Jobs Online | Video Game Tester Jobs

Hey sir I’m want to be a video game tester, and we are doing this project and one of the requirements are to interview someone in the field who has the same career me and my teacher couldn’t find any one and the last and only way to get an interview is with you, hopeful you’ll take the time to ask some questions but, I can send you the questions in a email if you want to do it. Like i said hopeful you have some time because my interview is due in a week, no pressure.

Many video gamers are also creatives – making this position all the more attractive to gamers. A Multimedia Artist is responsible for dreaming, designing, visualizing and creating graphics and animation for video games and other multimedia. This person is responsible for bringing the writers’ dreams to life on a screen, so you could say the job is pretty important.
Game testing can most definitely lead to other roles in the game industry.  A common complaint that I hear from candidates is that "I can't apply for this job because I haven't worked in the industry for x years" or "I can't get the experience because I can't get the job to start with".  Game testing is one of the few roles in the entire tech industry where you can get a chance without the years of experience behind you.  That being said, just because you are working as a game tester doesn't mean you're going to be a game designing in 5 years.  You need to continue learning new things and focus on skills and technologies that are relevant to the specific area in the industry you'd like to advance into.  Work on side projects with friends or co-workers that will allow you to continue learning new things, continue taking classes to keep your knowledge current.

Here, every day is different. Do you prefer a behind-the-scenes role? One at the front and center of the action? Or something in between? At Penn National Gaming, there’s a “fit” for just about anyone.  What began in the seventies as a single horseracing venue has grown to become one of the nation’s largest gaming companies. Penn National Gaming has properties in 18 states as well as Ontario, Canada. But as big as we are, we still feel like family. With company-wide managerial support, resources, and training, our employees can count on a positive experience no matter where they choose to work. What makes you happy? Imagine giving your all to a company and watching that same commitment come right back to you.
The perfect job! Drink while working or work while drinking! I need you to playtest a drinking party game (dare type, barnyard themed) while checking various aspects of the game: - which cards aren't working/fun. what changes could be made to them (rewording, rating and etc) - is there a way to balance the game better - is the game even fun? - what's the weakest part of the game? - how did the theme and characters fit this type of game? Requirements: - Testing will need to be conducted 3-4 times in 1 week. - Before testing we'll come up with a simple questionnaire that you'll ask your friends (did you like the game? would you buy it? what did you like most/least about it? would you play it again?). - You will need to print out the game (we'll send you the pdfs of cards) - During the test you will need to gather other info to report on (comments on content, reactions to content, playing time and etc). Comments on content can be written in the doc I'll send you, the rest we can just discuss over skype. - You'll propose changes and correction according to that report. :) If we work well together, I'll ask you to continue playtesting the game and even get involved in other game projects later. :) I would rather pay per playtest. So if you know that you are able to test an x amount of times, send me your offer. less more
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