Whether it’s mobile games, social games, browser games, PC, console or online games – Games-Career.com gives you access to the best video game jobs. Our job portal brings you new listings every day in the fields of Art, Audio / Sound, Business Development, Community Management, Game Design / Level Design, IT, HR, Online Marketing / PR, Payment, Product Management, Producing, Programming, QA and Web Development. If you are working or looking for gaming jobs and are ready for your next career move, Games-Career.com is the platform for you. The same applies to students and new talents with an interest in computer and video games who want to break into the industry or gain professional experience in game development, production and marketing. Companies like Bigpoint, Gameforge, gamigo, Goodgame Studios, InnoGames, Namco Bandai, Aeria Games, Travian Games, wooga, XYRALITY, Daedalic and YAGER publish current game job openings on our portal. No matter whether you are searching for a community manager position in Madrid, game tester jobs in London, marketing or PR work in San Francisco, an IT assignment in Vancouver, or employment as a programmer in Paris, Games-Career.com is where you will find the perfect match. And if what you are looking for is a full- or part-time training position, internship, traineeship or placement as a working student in the games industry, you’ve come to the right place as well. Should your search of the listed game jobs not return the desired result, you can post your own job request free of charge complete with your CV and work samples. If you have any questions, feedback or suggestions, please get in touch with us at any time – we’re here to help.
Hi.I am a 12th student from India and have taken the commerce stream . Sir i would like to become a Qa tester,but i dont know what to do after 12 like what course should i go for for acheiving my ambition .I am willing to go to any place and study to achive my dream . Sir please help to achieve my dream and help me to reach a higher position in my life with a good salary.

This next question is kinda off topic, but were you, at a time, ever a game tester? If so, was is for a big company? I always worry that I won’t get hired, because, since it has to do with video games. A lot of people are going to want to apply for the positions. I’m also aware of the work involved in game testing. I know about the “bug hunting”. The reports about the bug found. What if after hours and hours of searching, you don’t find a bug or miss it by the slightest bit? Would you lose the job? And if you lose the job, would you have to send the equipment back?
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Hi Dalton, some testing jobs are fine and others might require a lot of overtime. It just depends on the company you’re at, some companies are well-run and some aren’t. And some are well-run, but sometimes external factors cause problems with the game’s shipping schedule and overtime might be required. I’d recommend doing some research on any company before you take a job offer to find out whether their employees seem to be happy or not.
I’m 14 and I’m really involved in gaming. Not just gaming but also I have taught myself to do things like mod android apps (apk files) and recently became a Playstation mobile “developer”. To play around with Unity and make little parts of a crappy game. While playing for instance skyrim I look for glitches and bugs I can profit from. I know I’m probably too young and all, but where can I get educated, like are there any programming clubs for teens? And even more I am interested in game testing. Why wouldn’t I? Are there any major or minor gaming companies who provide this for people in my age? For like summer Jobs?
A video game tester is expected to take a wide range of actions in the game to identify any bugs or glitches. Essentially, a bug is something wrong with the programming, and there can be a huge variety of them. A bug comes when a player gets trapped in a certain spot, or when a movement graphic doesn’t work properly on a specific character. There are literally millions of possible bugs that could be in the game, but thanks to game testers, most games are released nearly flawless.
Hello! I know this is from a few years ago, but I see you still answer peoples inquires, thanks so much for that! I only have one question, what are the reports on bugs like? Is there a format that you need to use, and do many of the reports look similar if the bug is similar? For instance, if you glitch through the floor in a building, but also in another town over of a game, would that be two different reports written the same, except for location? And how long are the reports typically? I’m actually about to buy your book in a few minutes so sorry if you address this within it, but thought I’d just get a jump start and ask here. Thank you!
Nearly any game studio needs testers, and some of the big companies like Nintendo, EA, and Microsoft employ hundreds of game testers either directly or through temp agencies. Like any job, you can start by searching for job postings near your city using the video game job search tool. You can also search on popular tech-industry job sites like Monster.com, or on job aggregator sites like Indeed.com.
I asked one of my friends who has run several QA groups over the years, and he’s heard good things about uTest. They provide a “crowdsourced” testing service, and he thinks that many of their QA employees work from home. But in general, if you want solid, full-time employment as a game tester, you won’t be able to work from home because nearly all game companies do not hire work-from-home testers. In fact, please be careful, because there are several scam websites that you need to watch out for. Learn more in my podcast about work from home testing scams. If it seems too good to be true… it is.
This can vary widely depending on the specific team/project you are working on. I've placed some testers into roles where they literally are pushing buttons for an entire day waiting for an error to occur, and other roles where a tester is sitting right beside the game developers testing a game in real time as game code is being written.  There are some companies that work extreme hours in order to finish projects on time but from what I've seen over the years this is not as common as it used to be.  There always will be crunch time where you can expect to work some OT, but extended periods of OT for months on end are not that common anymore.
hi i am a 21 yr old young man who loves to play games,,,i have done graduation in electrical engg,, and now i am employed in a company as an engineer,,,when i came back off from duty then i just like to spend all the remaining time in playing video games,,,i mainly play on my xbox 360 and on ps3 too,,,from my point of view i think that i am a very good player,,,playing games when i was only 8,,,well i heard about the game testing in a site,,which says that u are get to paid only by testing games which are yet to strike the market,,,i thought earlier that they were spams but after a quite research things changed for me,,,so now i want to become a game tester if i can get the oppurtunity,,,,i am a good gamer and only satisfied when i completes every game to its 100%,,,i have played many times of games like arcade,,shooting like call of duty 1,2,3 mw-1,mw-2,black ops,mw-3(new one) to role playing games like assassin's creed every part to 100% syncronisation,have all the save data for the proof to,,,and specially like strategic games like king's bounty,age of empires etc,,,so i want to know that with my capabilities and a will to play can i become a game tester??
I'm 19 year old female and love to play video games. I've been playing for about... maybe 10 years? I don't really remember... but I've been thinking of getting a job as a beta tester, but with no luck... I used to have the ps2 and wii, but we had to get rid of them and I currently have the 3ds and still play it... too much I might add. Do I have any chance at all on becoming one?

Companies often pay contractors a higher base pay in lieu of benefits, but Danny only made $10 an hour. Extrapolating this data, means the average salary for a full-time position is roughly a meager $20,800. The federal minimum wage is $7.25, but game-testers are information workers, not burger flippers. It takes skill and knowledge to test and judge a game.
so iv loved gameing since i was little and i play about 40 hours a week. i just never get bored of them. the question i have is i want to become a tester first so i can get some feel for the gaming industries before i go ahead and start trying to do a degree in game design and programing. the closest school to me is art instutute of wasington. wich is acouple of hours away. the ting i want to know is im not that i cant draw all that well to be honest. how would that effect on getting a degree in this field.
The reality is, there are thousands of people who do have those cool jobs working in the video game industry. In fact, for those of you who were told by your parents to get off the couch and do something with your life, the reality is, playing video games can be a key to success in the gaming industry, says Marc Mencher, president of Game Recruiter, the premier search firm in the game industry.

Hi Satadala, I think you have enough experience to get a job as a game tester. So it’s hard to know why you have not been hired yet, you may just need to be persistent and keep applying. You should also try applying for smaller game studios, as EA/Ubisoft/Etc. likely receive hundreds of applications each week. You may have better luck with a smaller studio to start out.

Hi Robert. It’s cool to see that you have so much passion for games! If you want to pursue a career making games, you need to figure out how to turn that passion into a skill set that you can use. I actually do think that getting a job as a tester could be a good place for you to start, because you could use your attention and focus to make money while you learn about the process of making games. Then after a while, you may start to see which other roles might be good for you to get into, for example you might make a good game producer.
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Hi Arun, most QA jobs are full-time jobs. But you could possibly learn programming and get a degree in the evening and weekends from schools that offer continuing education or adult-learning certificates. For example I learned programming and made my first game demo while I was a tester, and then I completed a 1-year game development certificate course while I was working full time as a game designer.
Hi Akshat, congratulations on landing a job testing games! That’s very exciting. Now that you work at a game studio, you should try to learn as much as you can from the designers. Make friends with them, show an interest in their work, and maybe offer to help outside of work if any of them are making indie game projects on the side. You could also consider taking a game design course either online or at a local college. Also, work to become the best game tester you can, because if you do good work for the company then they’re more likely to keep you around and trust you to try you in other job roles. Again, congratulations, and good luck!

Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?


Every single video game is tested. Quality assurance is part of creating great games. Without testing, video games will have annoying flaws and bugs that will create unhappy customers. Testers focus on categories like compliance, functionality, compatibility, localization, soak, beta, regression load, or multiplayer to find flaws that crash gaming consoles, loop dialogue, freeze games, erase progress, or skew visuals. It is the video game testers job to play the game and find these loopholes, flaws, glitches, bugs, secrets, and problems.
I asked one of my friends who has run several QA groups over the years, and he’s heard good things about uTest. They provide a “crowdsourced” testing service, and he thinks that many of their QA employees work from home. But in general, if you want solid, full-time employment as a game tester, you won’t be able to work from home because nearly all game companies do not hire work-from-home testers. In fact, please be careful, because there are several scam websites that you need to watch out for. Learn more in my podcast about work from home testing scams. If it seems too good to be true… it is.
It might surprise you to learn that strong writing and communication skills are essential for a good video game tester. The ability to write in a clear, brief, and effective manner will help you describe the glitches you find and how you found them. Your clear writing will give developers a clear path to addressing the issue and creating a fix. You don’t have to be a poetic, colorful author; you need to be a clear, concise, and detailed communicator.
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