We often get this question: “What’s next after ISTQB Foundation Level certification if I want to really stand out?” If you want to test apps, you’ll also want ASTQB’s Mobile Testing Certification. And you can impress companies even more with your ISTQB Agile Testing Certification. But those are optional, simple next steps. Start with the easy first step of getting your ISTQB Foundation Level certification with the information below or if you need help, by taking an accredited software testing training course.

The hardest part of this job is that most video game testers don’t get to pick the game they are testing. If you are a diehard Guitar Hero fan, it may be challenging to test for controller problems in the newest Hannah Montana game. Every tester must remember that video game testing is a job and even after long hours and sore eyes, you are still getting paid to play video games. And sometimes you live the dream, when you are paid for “testing” Mario Kart or beating Ninja Gaiden.
At OnlineGameTester we help gamers to become game testers, QA and beta tester in a insanely growing industry. We have a small dedicated team, who developed a platform for gamers and game developers. We have created e-books, video guides, tutorials and much more, to help gamers get started, and teach you everything you need to know about game testing, reporting, recording etc.
GameStop's rapidly growing, multiple-brand business model provides talented people with many ways to develop and grow their career. We are committed to the ongoing talent development of all GameStop associates and offer unique learning opportunities through our proprietary LevelUp Interactive, LevelUp Leadership, and high-potential talent development programs.
Hi, there, my name is Robert. I’m a gamer that loves JRPGs, and would love to be in this business, but I feel you need to know rocket-science do be in this industry. Am I wrong? I also have no college degree. Is a game tester the best way to start, or trying to a make phone game, if I want to be a game designer? Or should I go to a college? I’m lost.
I was searching for job like this.. honestly, this type of jobs is my dream, first thing that i known about how to become game tester is the passion on playing a games. I know, the main jobs of the game tester is searching bugs/glitches from the game. A real gamers still can’t be the game tester if he/she can’t focus on searhcing bugs on the games that they’ve played. Now, let me introduce myself.. I’m not a good programer, I’m not a skilled person that can drawing something manual or using computer, but i had experience about game tester that i learned from internet. A bit of story from me, I only had a laptop with bad specs, but i always want to play games. So i setting my pc until i can play a games work on 60fps, but from that, i got some experience especially on focus when playing a games. One thing that important to be a game tester is focusing to search any bugs on games. And then, the most important after focus on searching bugs on games is reporting the bugs that i’ve found. The report must be detailed, so the programmer of the games can fix the bugs from the tester found. Please reply this message Mr. Jason, i just want to get job that same as my hobby.. and that is be a “Game Tester” Thank You..

Hi Nafis, if you already know how to program, then you should practice programming video games and start building a portfolio of small game demos. You can apply for game jobs just the same way you apply for any job: Search the Internet or game studio websites to find the job openings, read the requirements to see if you fit 80% of the requirements listed, and then follow the instructions to apply.

Hi, my name is Danny, from Houston,Texas. I’m 16 on my sophomore year. I’ve been playing games since in my early childhood years. I currently have a ps3, ps4, and Touchscreen all in one computer (not good for gaming though). After graduating high school, I’m not really sure how to start being a video game tester. I have no skill, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn. Any tips to help me out?
Hi Samin, your comment made me chuckle! If you could get paid to play games, then everybody would do that for sure. The fact is that game testing is a lot of work, and sometimes it’s not even very fun. You don’t get to just play the game, you have to search for bugs and write a report for each bug you find. Sometimes you could write 20 or more reports each day. Then when the dev team fixes the bug, you have to go into the game to make sure it’s really fixed, which can take a while.
Game testers may also have to run through matrix testings. Matrix testing is often used in fighting games like Mortal Combat, Tekken, or Soul Calibur. Say a fighting game has 20 different characters and 20 different levels. When doing matrix testing, the video game tester would need to play as each character vs each character (including Character 1 vs Character 1) on all 20 levels. That’s 8,000 different matchups! That’s just one example of the highly-detailed, often monotonous work that video game testers have to do.
- Hello, my name is Christian Bradley. I'll be your guide for this course on careers in the game industry. The video game industry has expanded to include AAA development studios, independent development teams, mobile app developers, and one man any studios. From the outside, each of these environments looks very different. This course is designed to help you understand the key skills that are common to all game development and how you can gain the experience you need to take your first steps in the industry. We'll talk about how game studios are structured, how games are financed and distributed, how programmers, artists, designers, and other professionals contribute to a game's design and development, and lastly, the specific skills that each of these professions require. So, if you're ready, let's take a look at careers in the game industry.
According to the Gamasutra Salary Survey of 2014, the online publication for Game Developer Magazine, the average salary for testers is about $54,833 annually. The same study found that testers with over three years of experience average roughly $48,426 a year. If you work for over six years, you can expect to reach an average of $62,885 a year, and those with a master’s degree earned on average $65,000.

We often get this question: “What’s next after ISTQB Foundation Level certification if I want to really stand out?” If you want to test apps, you’ll also want ASTQB’s Mobile Testing Certification. And you can impress companies even more with your ISTQB Agile Testing Certification. But those are optional, simple next steps. Start with the easy first step of getting your ISTQB Foundation Level certification with the information below or if you need help, by taking an accredited software testing training course.
Video games are a major part of the UK’s screen entertainment industry. Games are everywhere, from phones, tablets, PCs, consoles and virtual reality headsets (VR). This exciting industry blends creative talents, from artists to technicians. Game development can be a highly complex process often lasting up to two years and requiring teams of programmers, designers, artists, writers, musicians, and even actors. Whether supported by multi-million-pound investment for a flagship console game, or a micro team working from home on a mobile game, developers can achieve great success. The computer games market is highly competitive and subject to seasonal peaks, and launch dates that need to be met.
Good at playing games and know some other languages? We need you!RecruitFirst is hiring 3 x Game Testers! You will be outsourced to our client to play and translate current popular games on the market!Location: IslandwidePay: $8 /hrDuration: 2 - 3 monthsWorking Hours: Mon to Fri 9am - 6pm (negotiable)What you need to do:- identify and document bugs in the games- run tests and spot grammar mistakes ...
Valve and Ubisoft may have internal testing teams, but most game studios do not keep a large number of testers on the payroll – instead, they hire outside game testing companies. I don’t know which contract firms they use, but Babble used to be a big one, and UTest/Applause is popular right now. You could start by looking at one of those companies.
I was searching for job like this.. honestly, this type of jobs is my dream, first thing that i known about how to become game tester is the passion on playing a games. I know, the main jobs of the game tester is searching bugs/glitches from the game. A real gamers still can’t be the game tester if he/she can’t focus on searhcing bugs on the games that they’ve played. Now, let me introduce myself.. I’m not a good programer, I’m not a skilled person that can drawing something manual or using computer, but i had experience about game tester that i learned from internet. A bit of story from me, I only had a laptop with bad specs, but i always want to play games. So i setting my pc until i can play a games work on 60fps, but from that, i got some experience especially on focus when playing a games. One thing that important to be a game tester is focusing to search any bugs on games. And then, the most important after focus on searching bugs on games is reporting the bugs that i’ve found. The report must be detailed, so the programmer of the games can fix the bugs from the tester found. Please reply this message Mr. Jason, i just want to get job that same as my hobby.. and that is be a “Game Tester” Thank You..
Work at a company that has friendly, fun, nice people working there. You may be working very long hours for days or weeks before each game release, which will be much more enjoyable if the people you’re working with aren’t jerks. Research the studio on Glassdoor.com, and ask people who may have worked there in the past. Avoid companies that seem to be full of jerks.
If being laid off isn't bad enough, finding continued employment is also difficult. "Everyone tries to advance to positions that aren't available and won't get," says Phil. While this may also be true for other careers within the games industry, he believes this problem is compounded because testers are often hired through a staffing company and not internally. Many publishers won't offer a reference because of contractor policies. Most testers are not, technically, employees.
I have been playing games ever sense I was 7 maybe younger and I haven’t really clicked with anything else I have don’t still don’t know what type of career I want because I am currently in school for auto but I don’t think its going to work out and I am going to go for welding but not sure how that’s going to go but I always play games every day so I was wondering If I have very little computer skills but every now and then I have great game ideas is there any thing I could do in the gaming world with that or not I mean once I was so bored that I was talking with my friends on xbox360 for over 3 hours and we pretty much created an awesome game in our heads didn’t right any of it down but idk just figured I would see if any of that could be used for any job in the gaming world?????
Well… All i do is gaming all i mostly ever wanted to do is game and it would be ARWSOME to be in the industry thats if there is one in New Zealand but if there is, i really want to just test game and do reports because i played games with a lot of bugs and i do make reports about them etc… But this is a job i would love to have!!! Sincerely – Harry Wilson McGill

Hello Jason W. Bay I was playing video games with my dad when I was around 6 months (I wasn’t very good at all) Like running to wall for hours and for days too. And you can see dad laughing. And soon I was getting good at it. So when I was 10 years old I was thinking for when I was 4. I want to be a Game Tester and my dad said to me “You can be anything you what you got to believe it inside yourself” So I believe for a every long time, Now I’m 17 years old and thinking for almost 13 or 12 years now.
Equally important is a growth mindset. You should see every day as an opportunity to improve yourself. We’re not looking for the feedback averse. You need conviction, passion, and horsepower to excel at Riot. We’re not in the rockstar business—we want smart, collaborative, and creative team players. It’s always about players. If it needs to be about you, we’re not the right spot.
You can take pride in working for the employer of choice in the communities where we do business. You'll participate in a culture that treats all employees with respect, encourages their growth and development, and rewards excellence. Your thoughts and ideas are welcome here. We want to hear every fresh approach and new experience. If you find that appealing, then IGT could be the place for you.  We look forward to meeting you!

Note to Recruiters and Placement Agencies: We do not accept unsolicited agency resumes. Please do not forward unsolicited agency resumes to our website or to any of our employees. We will not pay fees to any third party agency, outside recruiter or firm without a mutually agreed-upon contract and will not be responsible for any agency fees associated with unsolicited resumes. Unsolicited resumes received will be considered our property and will be processed accordingly.
Hello! I know this is from a few years ago, but I see you still answer peoples inquires, thanks so much for that! I only have one question, what are the reports on bugs like? Is there a format that you need to use, and do many of the reports look similar if the bug is similar? For instance, if you glitch through the floor in a building, but also in another town over of a game, would that be two different reports written the same, except for location? And how long are the reports typically? I’m actually about to buy your book in a few minutes so sorry if you address this within it, but thought I’d just get a jump start and ask here. Thank you!
Valve and Ubisoft may have internal testing teams, but most game studios do not keep a large number of testers on the payroll – instead, they hire outside game testing companies. I don’t know which contract firms they use, but Babble used to be a big one, and UTest/Applause is popular right now. You could start by looking at one of those companies.
I enjoyed my time at Multiplay. A typical day included helping a large number of customers through ticket and live chat interfaces with issues surrounding the operation of their game servers. I learned some new techniques regarding the rapid deployment of game updates to a large number of servers (often 20-30, or more, machines on 5 separate continents). - more... Both management and my co-workers were an absolute blast, and the environment was light-hearted and fun. The hardest part of the job was managing the number of issues that would crop up, as we'd often face several hundred new tickets a day - n ... - less
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: Polish (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia
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