The Community Manager will serve as the vital link between our company and its global community of game developers and designers, NGOs, funders, and businesses using games to catalyze change across sectors from health and education to social justice and the environment. The Community Manager often serves as the first point of contact, helping establish and maintain our organization’s brand vision and experience.
Hi Tim, if you’re getting an Associates in Software Development then that’s a good ground to start out on. Here’s my advice: Build a very small game project while you’re in school, to use as a portfolio piece when you start looking for jobs. Then once you graduate, you can apply to jobs in other cities – just be prepared to move to a new city if you get a job offer. I wish you luck!
CPU: Intel Core i3-3210 3.2 GHz / AMD A8-7600 APU 3.1 GHz or equivalentRAM: 4 GBOS: Windows 7 and upVIDEO CARD: Integrated: Intel HD Graphics 4000 (Ivy Bridge) or AMD Radeon R5 series (Kaveri line) with OpenGL 4.41Discrete: Nvidia GeForce 400 Series or AMD Radeon HD 7000 series with OpenGL 4.4FREE DISK SPACE: At least 1 GB for Game Core and Other Files
Although requirements vary, you may need or benefit from technical training or an undergraduate degree in a technical field. Potential degree programs may include computer science, software development, or graphic design. Sometimes employers want video game testers with backgrounds in technology because they need employees who can do more than just test games. For instance, they may need workers to perform programming tasks or provide customer support. Other employers prefer testers who are tech-savvy because they want testers who can communicate problems to game developers and point out specific technical issues.
Compounding the physical and mental stresses that QA testers endure was the complete lack of job security. "During training, they told us it's not a matter of 'if' you'll be laid-off but 'when'," says Keith. "They flat-out tell you that what makes a good employee is the number of bugs you find and it is this number that will determine if you are kept on or not." This methodology, however, did not accurately take into account the quality of dedication that went into a project. "Here I was recreating and logging how to get stuck in the tail of a helicopter. I would have other testers comment on how much they liked my bugs, because I was one of those guys who would be able to reproduce those bugs that stumped everyone else, but when it came to the end of the project, the guy next to me had more bugs, so I was laid-off and he was not."

Hi I just wanted to say I know gaming world is not easy but work job isnt I love playing game I love writing I love find patches in every game I play and I usually not that easy… but I tend to have fun with it im not going to say im the best or anything like that but im pretty good at what I do im barely 18 and I love to work . Ive always wanted to a game taster but never really understood how to do so … but I have a few questions on how everything works but I am a hard worker and fun to know and talk to … it hard to work away from home because im a single father of a one year old and I’d to work from home so I could raise him and work at the same time … what would be a good way for me to get into the gaming industry?


hi im very curious about becomeing a Video Game tester and I’ve been playing video games since I was a child and really want to get into this industry. I live in Canada but I don’t know what area’s around here might employ me so i really wanna know just how i can become a Game tester in Canada and im in to Role playing Games like Dark Soul’s and Skyrim games like that so is there any advice you can offer me
- Hello, my name is Christian Bradley. I'll be your guide for this course on careers in the game industry. The video game industry has expanded to include AAA development studios, independent development teams, mobile app developers, and one man any studios. From the outside, each of these environments looks very different. This course is designed to help you understand the key skills that are common to all game development and how you can gain the experience you need to take your first steps in the industry. We'll talk about how game studios are structured, how games are financed and distributed, how programmers, artists, designers, and other professionals contribute to a game's design and development, and lastly, the specific skills that each of these professions require. So, if you're ready, let's take a look at careers in the game industry.
This is one reason why it’s best to try and get a full-time employment (“FTE”) testing job at an established game company. Most regions require that employers provide medical benefits to their full-time employees, so it’s often a safer way to go. If you can’t find and FTE job initially, you may want to consider working as a temp at first, just to learn the job and get some experience on your resume.
I enjoyed my time at Multiplay. A typical day included helping a large number of customers through ticket and live chat interfaces with issues surrounding the operation of their game servers. I learned some new techniques regarding the rapid deployment of game updates to a large number of servers (often 20-30, or more, machines on 5 separate continents). - more... Both management and my co-workers were an absolute blast, and the environment was light-hearted and fun. The hardest part of the job was managing the number of issues that would crop up, as we'd often face several hundred new tickets a day - n ... - less
Hi Alyssa, my book does go into detail about how to write bug reports (thank you for buying a copy!). The answer to your question is “it depends” — sometimes a bunch of glitches are caused by a single bug in the code, but you probably wouldn’t know that unless you talked to a programmer about it. In your example, if you notice that you glitch through the floor in many places, you might write just one report that describes the bug and then gives a few examples of where it happened. That might be good enough to help a developer find the bug and fix it.
P.S. The only way you can find out how great all of this can be is to get started today. We promise you a 100% Money Back Guarantee within 60 days! That's how confident we are of this AMAZING system. You can be signing up for your very first video game tester job within minutes, even if you're all the way in India, Australia, or even Singapore! That's the beauty about the Internet, it's a 24hr, World-Wide GOLDMINE! You can work when you want and how you want!
Hi Stephen, you aren’t convinced by my articles on game developer salary, which are well-cited? And not by my interviews with game industry veterans from giant game teams like Assassin’s Creed, Forza Motorsports, Project Spark, and mega-hits like Plants vs. Zombies? Or by all my articles on interviewing at game companies, based on many years of experience as a hiring manager? Then I’m afraid you can’t be convinced.
Hey Jason, I have read so much on become a QA tester and have a few questions. First I’m going to start off by saying I am a successful BDA for All State insurance, I am 27 years old, and I have 3 diploma’s all in the business field. You might be wondering why I would be interested in pursuing a video game testing job as I do have a successful career already but to be honest gaming is the thing I love the most and I’ve never had that feeling of waking up and being excited to go to work, I kind of just do it cause the money is good and its what I’ve got at the moment so I roll with it. I now understand that you need to do a job you love over a job that pays well because its the thing you do most of the time! and lets be honest, I don’t get excited everyday about selling insurance or handling someone’s claim. I have been a hardcore gamer since I was 5 years old, all started with a Sega genesis. Ive played competitive in league of legends, heroes of the storm, overwatch, cs:go, wow arena (when it was big), I’ve literally played all these gamers with the best of the best and at one point was sponsored by 2 different companies to pursue a competitive scene in overwatch and league of legends. So my gaming experience and skills at games are well above average, as well as my knowledge for games themselves (I’ve played so many!) My question to you is do you think it is possible for someone being 27 years old to get into the gaming career? Am I limited by my age? And I also live in Canada (close to Toronto) and I feel Canada may not have the best gaming studio’s, if any near me at all….. Now I tried reading a few things from your book and tried using your “search for studio’s near you” engine but I don’t think its geared for Canadians. What steps do you think I should take to pursue this dream I have to become a game tester or even just work with a gaming company through marketing or design, writing (I have a very smart mind and I feel I can create a very good gaming story line, Ive created 2 previous games with my friends and the story line was killer! Story was all me!) etc.
I live in the UK and am currently trying to decide what career I want to do in the future. I’ve been playing vdeo games for as long as I can remeber so I feel like a job in this sector would be great. Unfortunately to get a degree that would mean I could become a game developer I would need to study IT at A-Level and to study it at A-Level I would have to study it at GCSE and unfortunately that was not possible. I feel that becoming a games tester would be satisfying but I would really like to move up in that line of work to become a developer so I was wondering if there was anything that I could do?
Attitude: Companies look for testers who have a good attitude, are hard workers, and can be fun teammates. They’ll avoid you if you’re overly negative, sarcastic, arrogant, or angry. If that sounds like you, then start practicing a positive attitude now, so it will become a habit by the time you apply for jobs. No matter how skilled you are at testing, nobody wants to have a jerk on their team.

Hi Brian, it’s great that you’re thinking of turning your love of games into a career. To get hired by a game studio, you need to have some skills that they’re looking for – usually either art, programming, design, or production. If you don’t have any of those skills then you might be able to get a job as a QA tester, but as you mentioned, you’d need to move to a city that has game studios.
Hi I have been wanting to be in video game industry’s since I was very little. And I’m not very book smart am a sports fanatic. I’m 18 and on my senior year. I don’t want to go to the military like my parents want so I want to pursue this dream. I could really use some eadvice and maybe a good company to start with. I’m very hard worker and focused on the solution rather then the problem. If you could help me out it could change my life. Thank you -Colten pol

1. Usually there’s a team of testers assigned to a game. They work together, but each one might be assigned a certain part of the game such as combat or AI, or it might be divided up by area such as level or character. Each tester submits their own bug reports, and then re-tests the bug once the development team has marked the bug as “fixed” in the next build.
I’m assuming this website is American-based (because of the mention of “provinces”), and I also assume people living in the UK or Australia won’t necessarily be able to use the advanced search; especially if you’re like me, and live in the middle of nowhere, essentially. But does the advanced search apply to worldwide users, or just to American users, or is it possible to select your country with this? I only found this website recently, so I haven’t tested it out, but if this isn’t the case, I hope you consider adding a selection of your home country to users, so they too can search for jobs.
I’m looking into becoming a game tester I live in Williams lake BC not sure how bout to do it I love video games and I do know most time game testings is for hugs and can be very tedious job writing reports more then game at times but its something I would love Tod do I don’t care bout the pay I just want to work for the company and the games not the pay the isnt essential for me my passion to make the games the best they can be is so any advice how to go bout this would be awesome

Diversity & Inclusion Students Inclusion Benefits News Find Your Career Data Privacy for Candidates linkedin twitter instagram youtube Browse Games Latest News Help Center EA Forums About Us Careers United States United Kingdom Australia France Deutschland Italia 日本 Polska Brasil Россия España Ceska Republika Canada (En) Canada (Fr) Danmark Suomi Mexico Nederland Norge Sverige Korean 中国 Legal Online Service Updates User Agreement Privacy & Cookie Policy (Your Privacy Rights)
I’m looking into becoming a game tester I live in Williams lake BC not sure how bout to do it I love video games and I do know most time game testings is for hugs and can be very tedious job writing reports more then game at times but its something I would love Tod do I don’t care bout the pay I just want to work for the company and the games not the pay the isnt essential for me my passion to make the games the best they can be is so any advice how to go bout this would be awesome
I'm 19 year old female and love to play video games. I've been playing for about... maybe 10 years? I don't really remember... but I've been thinking of getting a job as a beta tester, but with no luck... I used to have the ps2 and wii, but we had to get rid of them and I currently have the 3ds and still play it... too much I might add. Do I have any chance at all on becoming one?

I’m assuming this website is American-based (because of the mention of “provinces”), and I also assume people living in the UK or Australia won’t necessarily be able to use the advanced search; especially if you’re like me, and live in the middle of nowhere, essentially. But does the advanced search apply to worldwide users, or just to American users, or is it possible to select your country with this? I only found this website recently, so I haven’t tested it out, but if this isn’t the case, I hope you consider adding a selection of your home country to users, so they too can search for jobs.
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: Polish (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia less more
×