Of course, this is a little bit of a stretch, considering that the number of video game jobs actually on the market is very minimal. With the right determination and effort, however, getting your foot into the industry is possible. Like many careers involving constantly-evolving knowledge and technology, there are always new opportunities: Game developer opportunities are expected to increase by about 11% annually over the next few years and the US Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates occupation growth of 6% from 2014 to 2024.


Are you passionate about gaming? Do you have excellent programming skills? Do you like being creative and working with the best developers, artists, and game designers from the industry? Do you enjoy solving technical challenges in mobile gaming and bringing mobile games to the next level? Then read on because you might just be the developer we're looking for.
I'm 19 year old female and love to play video games. I've been playing for about... maybe 10 years? I don't really remember... but I've been thinking of getting a job as a beta tester, but with no luck... I used to have the ps2 and wii, but we had to get rid of them and I currently have the 3ds and still play it... too much I might add. Do I have any chance at all on becoming one?

Or, to put it in other terms, rather than sitting around playing games all day, you'll be sitting around playing the same part of a game over and over. And not the climactic boss fight, either – at least, not necessarily. You're just as likely to be assigned to make sure that the different sections of the pause menu work in all different areas of the game.
are there any places for these jobs in Canada, and for age complies would 17 work. I can honestly say I’ve played video games since I was around 3-4 since then I slowly went up in gaming. now I’m more into battlefield and call of duty or really any shooters. I have found bugs on my own and done a lot of the things you said that you would have to do as a game tester like writing a report, do you have to be good with code and things like that to make a job?.
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You’re right that it depends on the size of the team. If you want to have a lot of input as a programmer, try working with a smaller team (like 4 to 20 people). However, programmers could have a lot of input on the design of bigger games, if they’re gameplay programmers. For example, if you’re the combat programmer on a fighting game, you may have a lot of control over the fine-tuning and overall “feel” of the combat, even if it’s a large team. Some of the best designers I know started out as programmers.
Location: SomersetWorking hours: Mon - Fri (9am - 6pm)[Negotiable]Duration: 2-3 monthsSalary: $8/hrResponsibilities:- Identify, isolate, and document bugs clearly and concisely in a bug database- Run test suites, verify fixes, spot grammar and language mistakes in specified language - Follow the documented processes at all stages of the testing process- Verify that bugs have been fixed and impleme ...

Jeez, some of the kids commenting here really can't type well. Either that or they're not good at English. You know it isn't all just fun and games you have to have some English skills because you have to write well detailed reports. You aren't just playing the game you have to analyze it and see where the bugs are or where are the rough patches and then report them to the company. I don't think that this kind of job is for 11 or 13 year olds. I think maybe you should explain that in your article above. This is coming from a 17 year old who has tested and now I make small games with a group of friends. (we're just learning the programs right now). Learning to program is a pain in the butt, but I think rather than small kids looking for jobs in video game testing, I think they should be encouraged to learn more about the games they love. You guys are to young. It bothers me just how many of you believe it is just getting paid to play when it isn't. Well those are just my two cents.
Each of these education paths will cover how programs and coding comes together to make the technology like video games, websites and online apps. You’ll also learn why certain programs behave the way they do, and how applications are designed from the ground up. This is highly technical education, but it may also involve theoretical and artistic concepts like color composition, image balance, texture, or user behavior.

Hi Samuel, video game tester and video game designer are 2 very different jobs. So the first thing you should do is learn more about each one, and see if you can decide which one you’d like the most. You can get an overview of each at the game careers overviews article, and get a sense of what a “day in the life” is like at the game career interview articles.
Hi Chris, being a game tester sounds fun, but it’s a hard job and doesn’t pay as well as the other jobs in the game industry. If you’re 13 and want to work in games, then I’d recommend working toward being a game designer, programmer, or artist. Depending on which one attracts you the most. Check out my article on the different jobs in the game industry, and see whether one of those sounds interesting, then work in that direction.
Employers typically want applicants who have a thorough knowledge and love for video games. To prepare for testing video games, you may want to gain experience with using different platforms and with different video game genres such as such as puzzle games, first-person shooters, multiplayer games, role-playing games, and online games. Each video game genre has a different feel, and video game testers need to know this information to verify that each game they test fits the genre specifications.
Testing videos games is one of the most vital parts of the game development process. Game developers need people like you to test their games to make sure there are no glitches or problems with the gameplay, music, graphics and general workings of the game. These companies are investing millions in there games and can not afford to release a poor game. So don't "unvalue" your importance and worth as a game tester.
During testing, the video game tester’s trained eye looks for problems that gamers will face. After a tester identifies a glitch, the problem must be written up and submitted to game designers to fix. This process can be challenging and it may mean replaying the same game of 2018 FIFA World Cup for 6 to 12 hours a day in a comfortable office. Repetition is the most exhausting part of video game testing.
Hi, my name is Danny, from Houston,Texas. I’m 16 on my sophomore year. I’ve been playing games since in my early childhood years. I currently have a ps3, ps4, and Touchscreen all in one computer (not good for gaming though). After graduating high school, I’m not really sure how to start being a video game tester. I have no skill, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn. Any tips to help me out?
Grammar check and spell check your resume. That's a personal pet peeve of mine and many hiring managers I work with.  Someone that applies for a testing role but can't catch spelling or grammatical errors in their own resume is usually passed over.  Writing bug reports is a large part of a game tester's job, and developers and test managers don't have the time to guess what you meant.

Hi Fellow Gamer … did you know everyday Gaming companies pay big bucks to people like you and me just to know what we are thinking? It's true! They are desperate to understand how you think and shop and why you buy certain Games or Products because this helps their companies improve their products, and they in turn they pay YOU good money for your opinion. They Need You! Right now, I have hundreds of market research firms and game companies looking for video game testers, survey takers and beta testers. If you are looking for working full time, or want to make some extra cash, Gamingjobsonline.com is your ticket to fun, easy money.
Hi Jacob, your first stop when looking for game studios in a given location should be GameDevMap.com. It’s a crowd-sourced list of studios. I can see that there are over a dozen developers and publishers there, but I don’t see any of the “giant” companies you mentioned – but that’s okay, because you don’t need to target the big, famous developers for your first job. Start wherever you can, build your experience, and then you can move elsewhere later on. Good luck!
I might be biased, but this is my favorite on the list. Customer service is a skill that takes patience, dedication and perseverance, but it’s also a skill that can apply to almost every industry. Getting into this industry as a Customer Support Agent will give you an inside view of the companies you would like to start a career with – and with a company like 5CA, you’ll also have doors opening in other similar industries that you may find you enjoy more.
Try to get involved with beta testing new games. Experience in open beta testing will give an indication of what testing work requires and can build up a résumé. Software companies often release open beta games to the public to get feedback and find glitches, usually providing guidelines on how to test them. Testing such games can expose you to identifying and isolating bugs, paying attention to small details, and writing reports.
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Love children? We do too! We are expanding our team to fulfil our mission of nurturing our future generation to help develop children’s level of confidence and communication skills! So do join us if you are outspoken, confident and love kids! Benefits - Insane Salary! Earn up to $4000 monthly with basic and commission! - On-the-job training with our proven methodologies! - Flexible working ...
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