If the idea of moving to a different city (or even a different country) freaks you out, I urge you to keep an open mind. Many people move to a new town to start their first video game job, so there’s already a support network in place to help you out. The company that’s hiring you might even offer financial assistance to help you with your moving costs.
Are you passionate about gaming? Do you have excellent programming skills? Do you like being creative and working with the best developers, artists, and game designers from the industry? Do you enjoy solving technical challenges in mobile gaming and bringing mobile games to the next level? Then read on because you might just be the developer we're looking for.
Testers can be paid hourly or they can be on an annual salary. Either way, the pay rate can vary a lot — it’s based on factors such as which game company you’re working for, what geographical location the studio is located within, and how many years of experience you have as a game tester or a game testing lead. Read more about the specific salary numbers per job and years of experience in my article about video game tester salary. I update it with the latest pay figures every year.

Companies often pay contractors a higher base pay in lieu of benefits, but Danny only made $10 an hour. Extrapolating this data, means the average salary for a full-time position is roughly a meager $20,800. The federal minimum wage is $7.25, but game-testers are information workers, not burger flippers. It takes skill and knowledge to test and judge a game.


very helpful article. i personally love breaking games and finding bugs. i just love to find those bugs that the developers/programmers didnt think of being possible or consider happening. just to find one and say “this is a game breaking bug, here is a way you could fix it” makes me happy because it might help keep another player from experiencing that bug and ruining there experience of the game. the mere fact that i sit playing games the first time through enjoying them and then going back and trying to break them for fun kind of qualifies me or places me in the area for QA game tester already but that doesnt mean much as i cant find anywhere to apply for such a job. i know minor programming and can give details on how to fix bugs in a way a programmer might understand better than the regular person testing the game without the knowledge. it’s just saddening for me that i have been searching for about 3 years now for somewhere to apply for this type of job. i truly have a passion for it, even though it’s considered a tedious job at times, i still love it.
If you don't have much work experience or previous testing experience, add a section to your resume towards the top that lists out your gaming experience at home.  Things to list include gamer scores, favorite game(s), platforms you own or play on, PC hardware knowledge, networking experience and any other technical skills that would be relevant to the game industry. There are a lot of particular skills we look for, but enthusiasm still matters.
I read through many of these comments and noticed that many of the questions are from younger and eager future designers who hopefully have a fantastic career laid before them. However, I am 24 years of age and have struggled to find a way to break into the gaming industry in Arizona. I am fluent in a handful of coding languages with experience and will be concluding my Associates program for Software Development in in the next few months but none of that means much if there is no ground to find my footing on. The kicker is, I cannot leave this state without having a solid foundation laid out in another state, but I do not want that to stop me from gaining professional experience in the Game Dev industry.
Hi, my name is Danny, from Houston,Texas. I’m 16 on my sophomore year. I’ve been playing games since in my early childhood years. I currently have a ps3, ps4, and Touchscreen all in one computer (not good for gaming though). After graduating high school, I’m not really sure how to start being a video game tester. I have no skill, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn. Any tips to help me out?
Hi Alyssa, my book does go into detail about how to write bug reports (thank you for buying a copy!). The answer to your question is “it depends” — sometimes a bunch of glitches are caused by a single bug in the code, but you probably wouldn’t know that unless you talked to a programmer about it. In your example, if you notice that you glitch through the floor in many places, you might write just one report that describes the bug and then gives a few examples of where it happened. That might be good enough to help a developer find the bug and fix it.
There don’t seem to be very many entry level Quality Assurance Tester job available. The few i’ve seen want at least 6 months experience and previous knowledge. Both of which I lack. I’m disabled and have no choice but to work from home. All the job postings i’ve seen are on site only. Oh well, that’s how every entry level job i’ve tried to look into ends up: a dead end of on site jobs. I guess i’ll just try applying for SSI again.
Hi Samin, your comment made me chuckle! If you could get paid to play games, then everybody would do that for sure. The fact is that game testing is a lot of work, and sometimes it’s not even very fun. You don’t get to just play the game, you have to search for bugs and write a report for each bug you find. Sometimes you could write 20 or more reports each day. Then when the dev team fixes the bug, you have to go into the game to make sure it’s really fixed, which can take a while.
Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?

I asked one of my friends who has run several QA groups over the years, and he’s heard good things about uTest. They provide a “crowdsourced” testing service, and he thinks that many of their QA employees work from home. But in general, if you want solid, full-time employment as a game tester, you won’t be able to work from home because nearly all game companies do not hire work-from-home testers. In fact, please be careful, because there are several scam websites that you need to watch out for. Learn more in my podcast about work from home testing scams. If it seems too good to be true… it is.
I'm 19 year old female and love to play video games. I've been playing for about... maybe 10 years? I don't really remember... but I've been thinking of getting a job as a beta tester, but with no luck... I used to have the ps2 and wii, but we had to get rid of them and I currently have the 3ds and still play it... too much I might add. Do I have any chance at all on becoming one?

Initially, the lead designer works with a small core team, defining the artistic approach for the game. The lead artist will supervise, if not undertake, the production of concept art which indicates the visual atmosphere and graphic design. They also research and test out different modeling, texturing, animation, rendering and lighting techniques and tools. The lead designer then manages the art and animation team (including outsourced staff), specifying what needs to be produced, ensuring deadlines and budgets and are met, and planning for any contingencies. Lead designers are employed by development studios, both independent and publisher-owned.

The perfect job! Drink while working or work while drinking! I need you to playtest a drinking party game (dare type, barnyard themed) while checking various aspects of the game: - which cards aren't working/fun. what changes could be made to them (rewording, rating and etc) - is there a way to balance the game better - is the game even fun? - what's the weakest part of the game? - how did the theme and characters fit this type of game? Requirements: - Testing will need to be conducted 3-4 times in 1 week. - Before testing we'll come up with a simple questionnaire that you'll ask your friends (did you like the game? would you buy it? what did you like most/least about it? would you play it again?). - You will need to print out the game (we'll send you the pdfs of cards) - During the test you will need to gather other info to report on (comments on content, reactions to content, playing time and etc). Comments on content can be written in the doc I'll send you, the rest we can just discuss over skype. - You'll propose changes and correction according to that report. :) If we work well together, I'll ask you to continue playtesting the game and even get involved in other game projects later. :) I would rather pay per playtest. So if you know that you are able to test an x amount of times, send me your offer. less more

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