During testing, the video game tester’s trained eye looks for problems that gamers will face. After a tester identifies a glitch, the problem must be written up and submitted to game designers to fix. This process can be challenging and it may mean replaying the same game of 2018 FIFA World Cup for 6 to 12 hours a day in a comfortable office. Repetition is the most exhausting part of video game testing.
"At this point, the 'testing madness' started to hit. One of our testers started cursing out loud regarding waffles and their condescending desire to be like pancakes. One by one I sent each tester home as their sanity became too unstable to control. At one point, I realized I was the only one left and we still had at least 3 more hours of work remaining."

Consider voluntary professional certification. Organizations like the American Society for Quality (ASQ) offer certification related to this field. You may also consider earning certification in more technical areas, such as a programming language. If you have programmer training you can become certified by passing written exams, although some exams may include practical skills tests as well as written questions. You also must maintain your certifications in accordance with the organization's guidelines.
Most game testing jobs are near the larger game studios, which happen to be in the larger cities around the world. You may be able to find testing jobs in smaller towns and cities, but if you’re positive that you want to break into the game industry then you’ll have the best chances of finding work if you can move to one of the major cities for game development.

Before you change your major, I think you should try taking an online programming class to see if you like programming. (CodeSchool has some great classes, and they’re inexpensive – maybe try their JavaScript classes.) If you find out that programming is interesting for you once you spend a few hours learning it, then you might consider changing your major.
hi Mr. Jason my Name is Dalton I have been currently working as a student in the Cascades jobcorps in Sedro Woolley, but frankly I’m from Marysville WA, I wanted to ask you if a game tester/QA tester gets any kind of Social life while trying to maintain his current life, I have been told from one person that it’s life crushing and from another it’s a can-do Career, but I wanted to know from your point of view
Ok, I am 20 years old. I have been playing games before I could walk. (Literally, I was sitting on my dads lap clicking around and “playing” the best I could as a toddler, Starcraft lol) No one on my family is as passionate about gaming as I am. Its no addiction or unhealthy because I control my weight, take care of my eyes/lighting, and take breaks. I immerse myself into the game. Replying games in different ways, especially free roam/open world games, and role play even. I was told once, “There is a whole world out there man, stop sitting in there playing games” to which I replied that “I have seen more worlds and lived more lives in my games that you may never experiance.” I am always promoting games I enjoy and recommed them. I convince people to at least trt demos/trials or view videos at least to see. I get excited for new games, and saddened when I beat title/franchise I put years into. (Mass Effect is one) My question/comment whatever you may see this as, is this. I do not hardly know anything about computers. Coding and modding is beyond my skills. However I do tell people what ideas I would like to see implemented, what bugs there is at times, I can play a whole day away besides eating,sleeping, etc if time permits, and I have ideas of worlds, languages, characters, and more all in my head. That I thought up. Some may be based off of races/worlds/names of other things but never exact. But I am terrible at art. I can not draw. I have all these ideas and said if I could put them on paper or on a computer I could be rich and bring whole new life to games. I am scared to shoot for a testing job and work in college only to fail out use lack of computing skills and art skills. I have a vivid immagination. I can look around my home state and turn it futuristic ot post apocolyptic or alien without even closing my eyes. No exaggeration. Advice? Wisdom? Anything. I have often thought (sadly I might add) of getting rid of games and “growing up” like everyone tells me to, but I want to give back o other games and become a designer or dev even someday. But afraid to mess up. Should I go with a normal mundane job, or risk it? Help me out peeps, ima gamer, ima nerd, a trekkie/trekker, harry potter lover, lord of the rings follower, star wars fanboy. In essence, im your peer xD advice?
Hi, I’m in my first semester in college now and I was thinking about going into gaming since I’ve been playing games for a long time since I can remember. I am thinking about changing my major into something like programming, but I never took a class in high school that was computer oriented and such. I was wondering do you think it would be a good idea to go ahead and change my major or not since I don’t really know about programming?
Ok, I am 20 years old. I have been playing games before I could walk. (Literally, I was sitting on my dads lap clicking around and “playing” the best I could as a toddler, Starcraft lol) No one on my family is as passionate about gaming as I am. Its no addiction or unhealthy because I control my weight, take care of my eyes/lighting, and take breaks. I immerse myself into the game. Replying games in different ways, especially free roam/open world games, and role play even. I was told once, “There is a whole world out there man, stop sitting in there playing games” to which I replied that “I have seen more worlds and lived more lives in my games that you may never experiance.” I am always promoting games I enjoy and recommed them. I convince people to at least trt demos/trials or view videos at least to see. I get excited for new games, and saddened when I beat title/franchise I put years into. (Mass Effect is one) My question/comment whatever you may see this as, is this. I do not hardly know anything about computers. Coding and modding is beyond my skills. However I do tell people what ideas I would like to see implemented, what bugs there is at times, I can play a whole day away besides eating,sleeping, etc if time permits, and I have ideas of worlds, languages, characters, and more all in my head. That I thought up. Some may be based off of races/worlds/names of other things but never exact. But I am terrible at art. I can not draw. I have all these ideas and said if I could put them on paper or on a computer I could be rich and bring whole new life to games. I am scared to shoot for a testing job and work in college only to fail out use lack of computing skills and art skills. I have a vivid immagination. I can look around my home state and turn it futuristic ot post apocolyptic or alien without even closing my eyes. No exaggeration. Advice? Wisdom? Anything. I have often thought (sadly I might add) of getting rid of games and “growing up” like everyone tells me to, but I want to give back o other games and become a designer or dev even someday. But afraid to mess up. Should I go with a normal mundane job, or risk it? Help me out peeps, ima gamer, ima nerd, a trekkie/trekker, harry potter lover, lord of the rings follower, star wars fanboy. In essence, im your peer xD advice?
Temporary Mascot / Helper (3 Oct to 31 Oct, Changi Airport)Job Descriptions:-Company: One of the Retail Shops in Changi Airport is hiring both Mascot and Temp HelperMascot's Job:• Wearing costume, this Mascot will need to wave to customers• Walk around the transit zone in Changi AirportEvent Helper's Job:• Sort and pack vouchers /free gifts• Approach customers and invite them for game sessions (sp ...
Hi,I am only 17year old but I’ve played so many games.Actually I’ve been playing since I was 5,and got my first gaming computer.I would love to play video games and be paid for it.I know that it’s not like that,but it’s harder than it sounds,but I searched it and I know what I have to deal with.I am spending arround 17-20hours per day just playing games,every type,I never get bored of it.The bad thing is that no one supports me and I live in a country that can’t provide games….So that’s how I ll never be a game tester.
Video games are a major part of the UK’s screen entertainment industry. Games are everywhere, from phones, tablets, PCs, consoles and virtual reality headsets (VR). This exciting industry blends creative talents, from artists to technicians. Game development can be a highly complex process often lasting up to two years and requiring teams of programmers, designers, artists, writers, musicians, and even actors. Whether supported by multi-million-pound investment for a flagship console game, or a micro team working from home on a mobile game, developers can achieve great success. The computer games market is highly competitive and subject to seasonal peaks, and launch dates that need to be met.
Greetings! I’m an English teacher and I’m from Venezuela. My question is, could I get a job as a game tester from my country? I ask you this because, part of my job in the Institute that I’m working on, is to interview future students. I recently interviewed a guy that told me he was working as a game tester along with 4 more people. Since gaming is my passion and I’ve been a beta tester for 20 years, I’ve always dreamed of becoming a real tester but didn’t know that I could do it from here. Could I work as a tester from my country? Thanks a lot!
Hi Arun, most QA jobs are full-time jobs. But you could possibly learn programming and get a degree in the evening and weekends from schools that offer continuing education or adult-learning certificates. For example I learned programming and made my first game demo while I was a tester, and then I completed a 1-year game development certificate course while I was working full time as a game designer.

Besides a typical “game tester” job, there’s also a job that you may not have heard of yet called an “SDET” (pronounced “ESS-det”). That stands for “software design/development engineer in test.” It’s a cool job that’s basically a tester that writes computer code – code that tests the game in an automated way. So it’s like a testing job, but the salary is much higher since it requires programming skills. A programming degree or some programming classes would be really helpful for landing a job as an SDET.
Compounding the physical and mental stresses that QA testers endure was the complete lack of job security. "During training, they told us it's not a matter of 'if' you'll be laid-off but 'when'," says Keith. "They flat-out tell you that what makes a good employee is the number of bugs you find and it is this number that will determine if you are kept on or not." This methodology, however, did not accurately take into account the quality of dedication that went into a project. "Here I was recreating and logging how to get stuck in the tail of a helicopter. I would have other testers comment on how much they liked my bugs, because I was one of those guys who would be able to reproduce those bugs that stumped everyone else, but when it came to the end of the project, the guy next to me had more bugs, so I was laid-off and he was not."
Hi Jacob, your first stop when looking for game studios in a given location should be GameDevMap.com. It’s a crowd-sourced list of studios. I can see that there are over a dozen developers and publishers there, but I don’t see any of the “giant” companies you mentioned – but that’s okay, because you don’t need to target the big, famous developers for your first job. Start wherever you can, build your experience, and then you can move elsewhere later on. Good luck!
very helpful article. i personally love breaking games and finding bugs. i just love to find those bugs that the developers/programmers didnt think of being possible or consider happening. just to find one and say “this is a game breaking bug, here is a way you could fix it” makes me happy because it might help keep another player from experiencing that bug and ruining there experience of the game. the mere fact that i sit playing games the first time through enjoying them and then going back and trying to break them for fun kind of qualifies me or places me in the area for QA game tester already but that doesnt mean much as i cant find anywhere to apply for such a job. i know minor programming and can give details on how to fix bugs in a way a programmer might understand better than the regular person testing the game without the knowledge. it’s just saddening for me that i have been searching for about 3 years now for somewhere to apply for this type of job. i truly have a passion for it, even though it’s considered a tedious job at times, i still love it.
I am currently striving for a college degree in writing and programming, it would seem going with the game tester route would be the easiest in terms of climbing he hierarchy, and just going in with a college degree would be faster but I think experience beats that.so if I developed my own game or my own storyboard etc.would that help me in getting more better jobs such as in design or art
Although requirements vary, you may need or benefit from technical training or an undergraduate degree in a technical field. Potential degree programs may include computer science, software development, or graphic design. Sometimes employers want video game testers with backgrounds in technology because they need employees who can do more than just test games. For instance, they may need workers to perform programming tasks or provide customer support. Other employers prefer testers who are tech-savvy because they want testers who can communicate problems to game developers and point out specific technical issues.
The job outlook for testers is directly tied to the video game industry. As long as people are lining up to buy the latest versions of Fallout, Madden, Call of Duty, or the hottest labels, there will be a need for testers to “break” these games. While it is unknown just how many video game testers there are in the US, the number is certainly in the thousands.
It might surprise you to learn that strong writing and communication skills are essential for a good video game tester. The ability to write in a clear, brief, and effective manner will help you describe the glitches you find and how you found them. Your clear writing will give developers a clear path to addressing the issue and creating a fix. You don’t have to be a poetic, colorful author; you need to be a clear, concise, and detailed communicator.
We are a growing online gaming company and are currently looking for a part-time freelancer, to help with the research of our competitors. This will include following and documenting daily activities within these games. Requirements: - Have basic understanding and experience with Google docs/sheet/slides - Be available a few hours throughout the day - Have a computer and a mobile phone.
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