Hi Jacob, your first stop when looking for game studios in a given location should be GameDevMap.com. It’s a crowd-sourced list of studios. I can see that there are over a dozen developers and publishers there, but I don’t see any of the “giant” companies you mentioned – but that’s okay, because you don’t need to target the big, famous developers for your first job. Start wherever you can, build your experience, and then you can move elsewhere later on. Good luck!
Most companies do not have a formal process for selecting a Lead Tester. If you want to progress in your career, then you should do great work and help your leads accomplish their goals for the project. Always work to take on more responsibility. If your leads come to see you as a hard worker who is capable of more responsibility, then they may promote you next time there’s an opening for a lead tester position.
As more technology becomes available to video game developers, the consumer market will expand to offer a wider range of products, thus creating jobs for all you hardcore gamers out there. After all, VR is only just getting started and there’s already over 1,100 VR supported games on Steam! Here’s a list of five video game jobs gamers might find interesting:
I know you’re just the author and may not have the exact answer I’m looking for,but I’m currently 16 and I play on PS4(mostly FPS,rpg,and anything in between),is there any other beta testing jobs available to me?Also the link where it allows your parents to apply a job application for their teen who is 16 and below doesn’t appear to work.Thanks in advance.
Hi Chris, being a game tester sounds fun, but it’s a hard job and doesn’t pay as well as the other jobs in the game industry. If you’re 13 and want to work in games, then I’d recommend working toward being a game designer, programmer, or artist. Depending on which one attracts you the most. Check out my article on the different jobs in the game industry, and see whether one of those sounds interesting, then work in that direction.
You’re right that it depends on the size of the team. If you want to have a lot of input as a programmer, try working with a smaller team (like 4 to 20 people). However, programmers could have a lot of input on the design of bigger games, if they’re gameplay programmers. For example, if you’re the combat programmer on a fighting game, you may have a lot of control over the fine-tuning and overall “feel” of the combat, even if it’s a large team. Some of the best designers I know started out as programmers.
I am currently striving for a college degree in writing and programming, it would seem going with the game tester route would be the easiest in terms of climbing he hierarchy, and just going in with a college degree would be faster but I think experience beats that.so if I developed my own game or my own storyboard etc.would that help me in getting more better jobs such as in design or art

I started this website because there’s very little information out there about how video game companies work on the inside, or how to get started in the industry. I’ve spent literally hundreds of hours, of my own personal time, to write dozens of articles to give you insight into making games as a career. And here they all are, all of them, for free. FOR FREE!

Attitude: Companies look for testers who have a good attitude, are hard workers, and can be fun teammates. They’ll avoid you if you’re overly negative, sarcastic, arrogant, or angry. If that sounds like you, then start practicing a positive attitude now, so it will become a habit by the time you apply for jobs. No matter how skilled you are at testing, nobody wants to have a jerk on their team.
Getting a job as a game developer is like the Hail Mary of the industry. This is probably the first to pop up in Google when searching for video gaming jobs, but your opportunities might be limited. Jobs site Indeed indicated that the amount of game developer openings have dropped 65% since 2014 while searches for “game developer” have increased by 50%. That’s why getting your foot in the door with one of the jobs above is a great way to grow your network and learn the trade from the inside.
We are a growing online gaming company and are currently looking for a part-time freelancer, to help with the research of our competitors. This will include following and documenting daily activities within these games. Requirements: - Have basic understanding and experience with Google docs/sheet/slides - Be available a few hours throughout the day - Have a computer and a mobile phone. less more
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