I enjoyed my time at Multiplay. A typical day included helping a large number of customers through ticket and live chat interfaces with issues surrounding the operation of their game servers. I learned some new techniques regarding the rapid deployment of game updates to a large number of servers (often 20-30, or more, machines on 5 separate continents). - more... Both management and my co-workers were an absolute blast, and the environment was light-hearted and fun. The hardest part of the job was managing the number of issues that would crop up, as we'd often face several hundred new tickets a day - n ... - less

Any travel that you may be required to do for work will be covered 100% by the company. They’ll pay for your flight and your hotel, and they’ll give you an allowance each day for food and other miscellaneous expenses. In general, business travel can be fun, and it’s a convenient way to see new cities. As a nice bonus, it also racks up your personal frequent flier miles.


A video game company doesn't function like your typical workplace. Rather than working regular office hours throughout the year, the company goes into "crunch mode" as a game's release date approaches. Because release dates are inflexible – the company has to get the game out by Christmas, the television ad time has been purchased months in advance, and so on – if there's more work that needs to be done, everyone just has to work harder. Any video game tester can tell you that crunch time means long, long days, running on an intoxicating blend of caffeine, junk food and sleep deprivation.
Before you change your major, I think you should try taking an online programming class to see if you like programming. (CodeSchool has some great classes, and they’re inexpensive – maybe try their JavaScript classes.) If you find out that programming is interesting for you once you spend a few hours learning it, then you might consider changing your major.
Living in the UK I’m aware that opportunities are more limited than in the USA. But I’ve been passionate about video games for as long as I can remember, and I’m certain this is the industry for me. However I hold no qualifications in programming, designing etc so testing seems to be the way to go (which is great because testing is the field im most interested in anyway). The things I’d like to know are:
IGT believes in sustaining a workforce that reflects the diversity of the global customers and communities we serve, creating a fair and inclusive culture that enables all our employees to feel valued, respected and engaged. IGT is an equal opportunity employer. We provide equal opportunities without regard to sex, race, color, religion, age, national origin or ancestry, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, genetic information, gender identity or expression, and any other personal attributes protected by federal, state, or other laws.

Hey Jason, I have read so much on become a QA tester and have a few questions. First I’m going to start off by saying I am a successful BDA for All State insurance, I am 27 years old, and I have 3 diploma’s all in the business field. You might be wondering why I would be interested in pursuing a video game testing job as I do have a successful career already but to be honest gaming is the thing I love the most and I’ve never had that feeling of waking up and being excited to go to work, I kind of just do it cause the money is good and its what I’ve got at the moment so I roll with it. I now understand that you need to do a job you love over a job that pays well because its the thing you do most of the time! and lets be honest, I don’t get excited everyday about selling insurance or handling someone’s claim. I have been a hardcore gamer since I was 5 years old, all started with a Sega genesis. Ive played competitive in league of legends, heroes of the storm, overwatch, cs:go, wow arena (when it was big), I’ve literally played all these gamers with the best of the best and at one point was sponsored by 2 different companies to pursue a competitive scene in overwatch and league of legends. So my gaming experience and skills at games are well above average, as well as my knowledge for games themselves (I’ve played so many!) My question to you is do you think it is possible for someone being 27 years old to get into the gaming career? Am I limited by my age? And I also live in Canada (close to Toronto) and I feel Canada may not have the best gaming studio’s, if any near me at all….. Now I tried reading a few things from your book and tried using your “search for studio’s near you” engine but I don’t think its geared for Canadians. What steps do you think I should take to pursue this dream I have to become a game tester or even just work with a gaming company through marketing or design, writing (I have a very smart mind and I feel I can create a very good gaming story line, Ive created 2 previous games with my friends and the story line was killer! Story was all me!) etc.
Online Game Tester is a website, network and job database created by a team with a big passion for games, game developing, game designing as well as game testing and reviewing. We have a lot of knowledge and experience within game testing, QA testing, game designing and developing, and we want you to make money by playing new cool games! We help you to become a game tester the easy way! We have developed some custom tools and guides that would help you succeed as a game tester, and created a job database and network with easy access in cooperation with companies like Activision, Blizzard, 2k, Rockstar Games etc
As the global leader in licensed sports merchandise, Fanatics is changing the way fans purchase their favorite team merchandise by partnering with top leagues, clubs and soccer brands worldwide to offer the largest collection of timeless and timely gear from every pro and college team online, on your phone, in stadiums or on-site at the world’s biggest sporting events. A top 50 Internet Retailer Company, Fanatics comprises the broadest online assortment by offering hundreds of thousands of officially licensed items via its Fanatics ( www.fanatics.com ), FansEdge (www.fansedge.com ) and Kitbag ( www.kitbag.com ) brands, as well as the largest selection of sports collectibles and memorabilia through Fanatics Authentic ( www.fanaticsauthentic.com ). A multi-channel company, Fanatics operates more than 300 online and offline stores, including the e-commerce business for all major professional sports leagues (NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, NASCAR, MLS, PGA), major media brands (NBC Sports, CBS Sports, FOX Sports) and more than 200 collegiate and professional team properties, which include several of the biggest global soccer clubs (Manchester United, Real Madrid, Chelsea, Manchester City). The company's in-venue and event retail portfolio includes the NBA, NHL, NASCAR, Wimbledon, Kentucky Derby, The Ryder Cup, Manchester City, Texas Longhorns, Pittsburgh Pirates and New Jersey Devils, allowing fans to experience a seamless shopping experience across online, mobile and physical store locations.

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Reuben says that maintaining a healthy family life extremely difficult. "Once the overtime starts, the hours seem to be nearly endless...My longest period of straight overtime lasted just over seven months where my shortest work week was 65 hours and my longest was 92. This was stretched out over two projects that just bled straight into each other."


EA has taken efforts to ensure that our on-line application system is accessible to individuals with disabilities and disabled veterans. Applicants with disabilities may contact us by sending an email to accessibility@ea.com for assistance accessing our careers.ea.com website. In your email, please including your name and preferred method of contact, and EA will respond as soon as possible.


At OnlineGameTester we help gamers to become game testers, QA and beta tester in a insanely growing industry. We have a small dedicated team, who developed a platform for gamers and game developers. We have created e-books, video guides, tutorials and much more, to help gamers get started, and teach you everything you need to know about game testing, reporting, recording etc.
A video game company doesn't function like your typical workplace. Rather than working regular office hours throughout the year, the company goes into "crunch mode" as a game's release date approaches. Because release dates are inflexible – the company has to get the game out by Christmas, the television ad time has been purchased months in advance, and so on – if there's more work that needs to be done, everyone just has to work harder. Any video game tester can tell you that crunch time means long, long days, running on an intoxicating blend of caffeine, junk food and sleep deprivation.
If you don't have much work experience or previous testing experience, add a section to your resume towards the top that lists out your gaming experience at home.  Things to list include gamer scores, favorite game(s), platforms you own or play on, PC hardware knowledge, networking experience and any other technical skills that would be relevant to the game industry. There are a lot of particular skills we look for, but enthusiasm still matters.
Interested in turning your love of video games into a career? This course will introduce you to the concepts and skills required to make it in the modern game industry—whether you want to build and finance your own game or land a job at a triple-A studio, with an indie team, or in mobile gaming. Learn about the history of video games, the structure of a typical game studio, the distribution paths for different types of games, marketing trends, the various roles (both artistic and technical), and the skills you need for each job. Christian Bradley provides practical, real-world advice about the game industry, and tips for getting your foot in the door. Plus, explore the courses and learning paths we offer to help get you started.
Are you passionate about gaming? Do you have excellent programming skills? Do you like being creative and working with the best developers, artists, and game designers from the industry? Do you enjoy solving technical challenges in mobile gaming and bringing mobile games to the next level? Then read on because you might just be the developer we're looking for.
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Try to get involved with beta testing new games. Experience in open beta testing will give an indication of what testing work requires and can build up a résumé. Software companies often release open beta games to the public to get feedback and find glitches, usually providing guidelines on how to test them. Testing such games can expose you to identifying and isolating bugs, paying attention to small details, and writing reports.
Hi Samuel, video game tester and video game designer are 2 very different jobs. So the first thing you should do is learn more about each one, and see if you can decide which one you’d like the most. You can get an overview of each at the game careers overviews article, and get a sense of what a “day in the life” is like at the game career interview articles.
i am eleven years old and i have been playing video games for about 4 years now i love playing video games its my true passion i think i would be great for a job of this and i have been looking around for a while but i cant find any good ways/website that i can apply on please reply back with a couple of website i could use or email adresses to send email to thanks

Be aware that there are scam websites that will try to get you to pay for your own equipment in order to get a job testing games. Do not work with those companies! All legitimate testing companies will provide you with everything you need, because they’re legally required to do so. Also, you should never have to pay money in order to find and apply for testing jobs. If a website asks you for money to help you find a testing job, stay away!
Hey! My name is Gloria and I'm 16. I am not exactly interested in video game beta testing. I'm more interested in like IMVU or Second life; Virtual worlds and such. I'm also interested in different types of software like music production, videography, photography and graphic design as well as art studio software and ect. I was wondering if you guys could help. I have been looking everywhere!
Don’t wait. It’s important to start on your ISTQB software testing certification now to get your job testing games. Begin by reviewing the free software testing glossary, exam syllabus (what you need to know to pass the exam) and sample exams below, as well as the steps to certification / FAQ. Then register to take the ISTQB exam from ASTQB. We hope to see you soon on ASTQB’s official American list of ISTQB certified testers!
You can sign-up for our network, with no problems at all. With our online freelance gaming jobs, you will be able to work from home, no matter where you live. Everything you need to get started is just your console or PC. All game tester tools, guides to get started, games and much more, will be supplied from Onlinegametester and our partners (game developers).
Hello my name is Cyril and i am interested in testing video games. My parents say its alright if i can find a job. I am aware of the difficulties and obstacles of testing video games. But i would like to know were i can get that kind of a job. It would really mean alot to me because it would be nice to have some cash and i would love to have the chance to develop and design video games. Thanks and God Bless.
Hey Jason, I really hope you reply to this because I can use the advice. I’ve been playing games since I was about 8 and ever since I love pointing out glitches and bugs. Because of this I would love to become a game/QA tester. Unfortunately I’ve been looking for advice online to find colleges for a while now, and I’m running around in circles. If you email me I would be able to get into more detail and information about my situation. I greatly appreciate any advice you give me, thank you.
Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?
I started this website because there’s very little information out there about how video game companies work on the inside, or how to get started in the industry. I’ve spent literally hundreds of hours, of my own personal time, to write dozens of articles to give you insight into making games as a career. And here they all are, all of them, for free. FOR FREE!
The Community Manager will serve as the vital link between our company and its global community of game developers and designers, NGOs, funders, and businesses using games to catalyze change across sectors from health and education to social justice and the environment. The Community Manager often serves as the first point of contact, helping establish and maintain our organization’s brand vision and experience.
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