Attitude: Companies look for testers who have a good attitude, are hard workers, and can be fun teammates. They’ll avoid you if you’re overly negative, sarcastic, arrogant, or angry. If that sounds like you, then start practicing a positive attitude now, so it will become a habit by the time you apply for jobs. No matter how skilled you are at testing, nobody wants to have a jerk on their team.
Funcom is looking to hire not 1 but 2 talented External Producers to handle the management of the company’s publishing projects. Opportunity locations: Raleigh, NC USA & Oslo, Norway The role’s responsibilities include the continuous communication with developers, the management of work pipelines, project finances, team management, internal and external resource management and the successful timely launch of the projects/titles.
This next question is kinda off topic, but were you, at a time, ever a game tester? If so, was is for a big company? I always worry that I won’t get hired, because, since it has to do with video games. A lot of people are going to want to apply for the positions. I’m also aware of the work involved in game testing. I know about the “bug hunting”. The reports about the bug found. What if after hours and hours of searching, you don’t find a bug or miss it by the slightest bit? Would you lose the job? And if you lose the job, would you have to send the equipment back?
Employers typically want applicants who have a thorough knowledge and love for video games. To prepare for testing video games, you may want to gain experience with using different platforms and with different video game genres such as such as puzzle games, first-person shooters, multiplayer games, role-playing games, and online games. Each video game genre has a different feel, and video game testers need to know this information to verify that each game they test fits the genre specifications.
I recently just asked on GameTesters.Net, about whether or not the testers get to keep the games or send them back, now i’ve been into gaming a lot, i’ve played many games ever since i was a kid, yes this goes way back from when i had Pokemon Stadium for the Nintendo 64, it was the very first system i ever had as a child, i don’t have it anymore, wish i did though, but anyways, this isn’t about a Gamer’s childhood or their very first game console, this is about bein paid, to be a Gamer, now i’d love to be paid just to play video games, it has been a dream of mine to be paid, just to play video games, i think that would be top notch, an awesome, plus it is something i enjoy doing, so if anyone can tell me how to land a job like this, just let me know in a reply.
At OnlineGameTester we help gamers to become game testers, QA and beta tester in a insanely growing industry. We have a small dedicated team, who developed a platform for gamers and game developers. We have created e-books, video guides, tutorials and much more, to help gamers get started, and teach you everything you need to know about game testing, reporting, recording etc.

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Hi Ruben, it sounds like you’ve already started developing some of the skills you need to get a job testing – namely, learning about games, and learning how to find and report bugs. You do NOT have to pay anybody to get a job testing games – game testing is like any other job, you just need to find the jobs (start your search here), apply, and interview. If anybody tries to make you pay to find testing jobs, it’s probably a scam and should be avoided.
Jeez, some of the kids commenting here really can't type well. Either that or they're not good at English. You know it isn't all just fun and games you have to have some English skills because you have to write well detailed reports. You aren't just playing the game you have to analyze it and see where the bugs are or where are the rough patches and then report them to the company. I don't think that this kind of job is for 11 or 13 year olds. I think maybe you should explain that in your article above. This is coming from a 17 year old who has tested and now I make small games with a group of friends. (we're just learning the programs right now). Learning to program is a pain in the butt, but I think rather than small kids looking for jobs in video game testing, I think they should be encouraged to learn more about the games they love. You guys are to young. It bothers me just how many of you believe it is just getting paid to play when it isn't. Well those are just my two cents.

At OnlineGameTester we help gamers to become game testers, QA and beta tester in a insanely growing industry. We have a small dedicated team, who developed a platform for gamers and game developers. We have created e-books, video guides, tutorials and much more, to help gamers get started, and teach you everything you need to know about game testing, reporting, recording etc.
Project managers ensure that a game is completed on time, within budget, and using the right resources. Prior to production they analyse game design specification and work out milestones, schedules, equipment and teams. They control financial resources and negotiate all contracts with suppliers and contractors. They may also oversee ongoing maintenance issues after launch. This is an increasingly important role as production schedules lengthen and development costs increase.  Project managers are employed by development studios and publisher’s in-house development teams.
Hi Carlos, in your question, you mention several different game jobs: writer, programmer, tester, design, and art. So the first thing I’d recommend is to get some clarity on which game job you want to do. If you can identify what it is you want to do, then the path will be clearer. If you’re currently going for a degree in writing or programming, then try to do some game-related projects while you’re in school, to start building your portfolio. Then you’ll be able to apply for jobs directly after college.
Hi, there, my name is Robert. I’m a gamer that loves JRPGs, and would love to be in this business, but I feel you need to know rocket-science do be in this industry. Am I wrong? I also have no college degree. Is a game tester the best way to start, or trying to a make phone game, if I want to be a game designer? Or should I go to a college? I’m lost.
Funcom is looking to hire not 1 but 2 talented External Producers to handle the management of the company’s publishing projects. Opportunity locations: Raleigh, NC USA & Oslo, Norway The role’s responsibilities include the continuous communication with developers, the management of work pipelines, project finances, team management, internal and external resource management and the successful timely launch of the projects/titles.

Im a 13 year old lad who loves to play on xbox mainly but i also like to play on playstations and other game consoles. I have nearly every game that is an 18 or a 15 including call of duty:modern warfare,call of duty:world at war, call of duty:modern warfare 2, call of duty:black ops, call of duty:modern warfare 3 and battlefield 3 and others. Wel really i know im a bit young probably to work but i used to work for game as a game tester and they had to fire me cos they got sumone older to test the games. but just lookin for a new job so if u want to message me my email address is alexcrawf10@hotmail.co.uk


Before you change your major, I think you should try taking an online programming class to see if you like programming. (CodeSchool has some great classes, and they’re inexpensive – maybe try their JavaScript classes.) If you find out that programming is interesting for you once you spend a few hours learning it, then you might consider changing your major.

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Sales/Game Advisors — Sales associates earn starting pay around $8.00 per hour. Also called game advisors, employees provide customers with information on games and products. Other tasks include greeting patrons, completing sales, and keeping stores clean and organized. Read the GameStop game advisor job description to learn about entry-level employment opportunities with the retail chain.
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