Game testing can most definitely lead to other roles in the game industry.  A common complaint that I hear from candidates is that "I can't apply for this job because I haven't worked in the industry for x years" or "I can't get the experience because I can't get the job to start with".  Game testing is one of the few roles in the entire tech industry where you can get a chance without the years of experience behind you.  That being said, just because you are working as a game tester doesn't mean you're going to be a game designing in 5 years.  You need to continue learning new things and focus on skills and technologies that are relevant to the specific area in the industry you'd like to advance into.  Work on side projects with friends or co-workers that will allow you to continue learning new things, continue taking classes to keep your knowledge current.
Available Positions at GameStop: Game Advisor, Accessory Associate, Key Holder, Assistant Manager, Store Manager, Customer Service Manager, Hardware Tech, Process Improvement Technician, Maintenance Associate, Refurb Trainer, Employee Relations Supervisor, Replenishment Driver, Inventory Control Supervisor, Lead Loss Prevention Agent, Loss Prevention Investigator, Multi-Unit Manager, District Manager
While the idea of working from home might seem appealing, most people actually prefer working in an office. You’ll learn much faster when you’re around other, more experienced testers. And it’s also a great way to build a community, and make a group of tester friends who will help each other out later on in your careers. Working from home can be extremely lonely, and people who work from home often don’t advance their careers as often as people who work in the office.
While the job may sound like a dream come true, Reuben says it's really not about getting paid to play games all day. "Imagine your favorite movie. Now take your favorite 30-second clip from that movie. Now watch that 30-second clip over and over again, 12 hours a day, every day for two months. When you've done that, tell me if what you've been doing is watching movies all day. I'm willing to bet you'll find that it's not quite the same thing...You get an area of the game, that's your area, and you test everything about that one area for months on end."
Game testing jobs generally don’t require advanced degrees. Since you’re going for post-secondary degrees, then it might be more applicable for you to work toward a job as a video game programmer, rather than a tester. In either case, start by looking up job postings for game studios near your home to see what requirements they list, and then start working toward those requirements. There are a number of large game studios with a presence in India such as Ubisoft, EA, Microsoft and more.
A video game job goes far beyond just creating or testing games for a Wii, Xbox or Playstation, to name a few. Professionals are needed to create games for computers, hand-held devices, mobile devices, and through social media networks, as well as the traditional gaming systems. But the industry needs workers who do more than just create the games. There are numerous job opportunities and positions in the gaming industry, including these positions, according to Mencher:
Hello , Im a 15 year old teen that would like to get into the game testing industry. I have good teamwork and also leadership communication skills. The consoles that I have are an Ipod 4th gen. Xbox 360, and an apple computer. I play about 9 hours a day on the weekdays and 19 on weekends. Though I would prefer an at home job cause I am currently in highschool. I would really like some feedback or maybe some job opportunities thanks also I am very good at locating glitches and will provide a very detailed report on every one I find. Please email me at jcastorillo@gmail.com .
I did a quick search on some game boards (the GICG job search, and Gamasutra jobs) and didn’t find any game testing jobs open in Michigan. However – according to gamedevmap.com, there are a few game studios in Michigan. So you might have some luck by reaching out to those studios via phone or email to find out whether they have in-house testing teams, or ask if they outsource to a local testing company you could get in touch with.
The lead programmer manages the software engineering of a game, developing the technical specification and then delegating different elements. They usually compile technical documentation and ensure the quality, effectiveness and appropriateness of all the game code. They also manage the production of the different ‘builds’ of a game, ensuring that coding bugs are fixed, and making sure everything happens on schedule. The lead programmer must also provide support and guidance to the programming team, which can include specialism in games engine programming, graphics programming, gamesplay, physics, artificial intelligence (AI), tools development, networking and build engineering.
Any travel that you may be required to do for work will be covered 100% by the company. They’ll pay for your flight and your hotel, and they’ll give you an allowance each day for food and other miscellaneous expenses. In general, business travel can be fun, and it’s a convenient way to see new cities. As a nice bonus, it also racks up your personal frequent flier miles.
Video game testers usually don't require any formal qualifications, although some knowledge of standard office software will be handy. This doesn't mean that some testers don't have BTECs or even degrees in computer games design, but these qualifications aren't necessary, although they can be helpful. Testers do need patience, discipline, organisation and persistence, because playing video games as a job isn't like playing video games on your own time.
Hi Jacob, your first stop when looking for game studios in a given location should be GameDevMap.com. It’s a crowd-sourced list of studios. I can see that there are over a dozen developers and publishers there, but I don’t see any of the “giant” companies you mentioned – but that’s okay, because you don’t need to target the big, famous developers for your first job. Start wherever you can, build your experience, and then you can move elsewhere later on. Good luck!
As our Platform/Build Engineer you'll be responsible for creating tools and systems to advance our in-development builds towards a polished, technical release across multiple platforms. You'll collaborate with a small team of developers to optimize efficiency of day-to-day tasks via tools and automation, while improving build performance and supporting QA.

Working on site at Sun Devil Stadium, our part-time retail associates are responsible for creating the ultimate shopping experience for our ASU fans. Our associates must always deliver an exceptional fan shopping experience for everyone that walks through our doors. If you have a passion for retail, an outgoing personality, love to sell, enjoy working on a team and strive to create relationships with our customers, this is the place for you!
Learn how to become a game tester with my book, Land a Job as a Video Game Tester. You’ll learn the basics of game testing, and all the steps to apply, interview, and accept job offers. I worked hard to write a book that provides everything you need to know to get a job testing games, but if I missed anything then you should email me and I’ll answer any remaining questions you may have. read it
hi Mr. Jason my Name is Dalton I have been currently working as a student in the Cascades jobcorps in Sedro Woolley, but frankly I’m from Marysville WA, I wanted to ask you if a game tester/QA tester gets any kind of Social life while trying to maintain his current life, I have been told from one person that it’s life crushing and from another it’s a can-do Career, but I wanted to know from your point of view
Hi Tyffani, you seem very passionate about games, that’s awesome! There are lots of different careers, so you need to figure out which one(s) might “click” with your interests and talents. You could start by finding out whether you are more attracted to art, or to programming, or design. Check out the Quest for Your Career articles to learn more about each one – once you find something that sounds interesting, then you can start thinking about how to pursue it. Have fun!
Game testing can most definitely lead to other roles in the game industry.  A common complaint that I hear from candidates is that "I can't apply for this job because I haven't worked in the industry for x years" or "I can't get the experience because I can't get the job to start with".  Game testing is one of the few roles in the entire tech industry where you can get a chance without the years of experience behind you.  That being said, just because you are working as a game tester doesn't mean you're going to be a game designing in 5 years.  You need to continue learning new things and focus on skills and technologies that are relevant to the specific area in the industry you'd like to advance into.  Work on side projects with friends or co-workers that will allow you to continue learning new things, continue taking classes to keep your knowledge current.
On a typical day, a tester will receive an assignment telling him or her to play through a certain part of the game in a certain way in order to identify any bugs. When a bug appears, the tester will fill out a report and submit it; he or she may be asked to replicate it several times. Once – or if – the developers believe they've fixed the bug, the tester may then repeat the process to make sure it's no longer there. Some bugs may be "waived," meaning that they remain in the final game.

I read through many of these comments and noticed that many of the questions are from younger and eager future designers who hopefully have a fantastic career laid before them. However, I am 24 years of age and have struggled to find a way to break into the gaming industry in Arizona. I am fluent in a handful of coding languages with experience and will be concluding my Associates program for Software Development in in the next few months but none of that means much if there is no ground to find my footing on. The kicker is, I cannot leave this state without having a solid foundation laid out in another state, but I do not want that to stop me from gaining professional experience in the Game Dev industry.
Hi Jackie, it’s interesting that you mention an interest in translation. Do you mean that you’re bilingual or multilingual? If so, you should investigate jobs as at companies that do “localization testing” because they employ translators and also testers. One company I’ve worked with before is Babel Media, so that could be a good place to start your search.

Greetings! I’m an English teacher and I’m from Venezuela. My question is, could I get a job as a game tester from my country? I ask you this because, part of my job in the Institute that I’m working on, is to interview future students. I recently interviewed a guy that told me he was working as a game tester along with 4 more people. Since gaming is my passion and I’ve been a beta tester for 20 years, I’ve always dreamed of becoming a real tester but didn’t know that I could do it from here. Could I work as a tester from my country? Thanks a lot!


Hi Samuel, video game tester and video game designer are 2 very different jobs. So the first thing you should do is learn more about each one, and see if you can decide which one you’d like the most. You can get an overview of each at the game careers overviews article, and get a sense of what a “day in the life” is like at the game career interview articles.
As more technology becomes available to video game developers, the consumer market will expand to offer a wider range of products, thus creating jobs for all you hardcore gamers out there. After all, VR is only just getting started and there’s already over 1,100 VR supported games on Steam! Here’s a list of five video game jobs gamers might find interesting:
HI, I noticed that most of you guys, if not all of you are adults. Well I am in 8th grade. I play video games whenever I can. Some days not at all, other up to 6 hrs. My dad doesn’t support my love for games at all. My mom isn’t as bad but still she wont be pleased, because I haven’t told them that I want to be a video game tester. I would like you guys to give me some about were I should go or what I should do to accomplish this. By the way I live in California by UC Irvine collage.

I recently just asked on GameTesters.Net, about whether or not the testers get to keep the games or send them back, now i’ve been into gaming a lot, i’ve played many games ever since i was a kid, yes this goes way back from when i had Pokemon Stadium for the Nintendo 64, it was the very first system i ever had as a child, i don’t have it anymore, wish i did though, but anyways, this isn’t about a Gamer’s childhood or their very first game console, this is about bein paid, to be a Gamer, now i’d love to be paid just to play video games, it has been a dream of mine to be paid, just to play video games, i think that would be top notch, an awesome, plus it is something i enjoy doing, so if anyone can tell me how to land a job like this, just let me know in a reply.
I am a gaming fanatic and a big gaming freak too. I am now 17 in India doing my 12th. I want to start my career in gaming industry by game testing. I have already started writing stories and idea for my games. I currently have 12 game Ideas out of which 9 don’t exist in gaming. So will I be a success in the industry. BTW I am also writing a book, I don’t know If it will help.
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Available Positions at GameStop: Game Advisor, Accessory Associate, Key Holder, Assistant Manager, Store Manager, Customer Service Manager, Hardware Tech, Process Improvement Technician, Maintenance Associate, Refurb Trainer, Employee Relations Supervisor, Replenishment Driver, Inventory Control Supervisor, Lead Loss Prevention Agent, Loss Prevention Investigator, Multi-Unit Manager, District Manager
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