Greetings! I’m an English teacher and I’m from Venezuela. My question is, could I get a job as a game tester from my country? I ask you this because, part of my job in the Institute that I’m working on, is to interview future students. I recently interviewed a guy that told me he was working as a game tester along with 4 more people. Since gaming is my passion and I’ve been a beta tester for 20 years, I’ve always dreamed of becoming a real tester but didn’t know that I could do it from here. Could I work as a tester from my country? Thanks a lot!
I might be biased, but this is my favorite on the list. Customer service is a skill that takes patience, dedication and perseverance, but it’s also a skill that can apply to almost every industry. Getting into this industry as a Customer Support Agent will give you an inside view of the companies you would like to start a career with – and with a company like 5CA, you’ll also have doors opening in other similar industries that you may find you enjoy more.
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: German (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia less more
The Community Manager will serve as the vital link between our company and its global community of game developers and designers, NGOs, funders, and businesses using games to catalyze change across sectors from health and education to social justice and the environment. The Community Manager often serves as the first point of contact, helping establish and maintain our organization’s brand vision and experience.
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Hi Ruben, it sounds like you’ve already started developing some of the skills you need to get a job testing – namely, learning about games, and learning how to find and report bugs. You do NOT have to pay anybody to get a job testing games – game testing is like any other job, you just need to find the jobs (start your search here), apply, and interview. If anybody tries to make you pay to find testing jobs, it’s probably a scam and should be avoided.


To get hired as a game tester, there are several skills you’ll need to learn: how to find and reproduce (“repro”) bugs, how to write bug reports, and how to verify that the game development team has fixed them. There are also “soft skills” you’ll need to learn such as being a good communicator, detail-oriented, and self-motivated. You can learn all of this and more by reading my book, Land a Job as a Video Game Tester. You’ll learn the basics of game testing, and all the steps to apply, interview, and accept job offers. It’s got everything you need to know to get a job testing games. read it
Testing videos games is one of the most vital parts of the game development process. Game developers need people like you to test their games to make sure there are no glitches or problems with the gameplay, music, graphics and general workings of the game. These companies are investing millions in there games and can not afford to release a poor game. So don't "unvalue" your importance and worth as a game tester.
Getting a job as a game developer is like the Hail Mary of the industry. This is probably the first to pop up in Google when searching for video gaming jobs, but your opportunities might be limited. Jobs site Indeed indicated that the amount of game developer openings have dropped 65% since 2014 while searches for “game developer” have increased by 50%. That’s why getting your foot in the door with one of the jobs above is a great way to grow your network and learn the trade from the inside.

Before you change your major, I think you should try taking an online programming class to see if you like programming. (CodeSchool has some great classes, and they’re inexpensive – maybe try their JavaScript classes.) If you find out that programming is interesting for you once you spend a few hours learning it, then you might consider changing your major.

Hey. I’ve been gaming most of my life and am meeting my ends as a teenager. im 17 almost 18 and am a senior in high school. For my English 4 class im required to ask a few questions that hopefully you can answer? I Love most games, and I always replay levels on games over and over, simply to see if I can do weird things anyways, so I thought maybe starting as a beta tester and working towards a game designer would be really nice. Id rather work from home though, as im limited on transport. any suggestions?
I’ve been playing games since I was two, and have participated in beta-tests as long as I can remember. More specifically; I’ve participated in beta-tests nearly every new game release there’s been in the past 12 years. I’m 18, so it’s legal for me to work in most places, It’s just a matter of finding the company with an open or will be open position as a qa tester, that is lenient on distance to the physical work place.

Equally important is a growth mindset. You should see every day as an opportunity to improve yourself. We’re not looking for the feedback averse. You need conviction, passion, and horsepower to excel at Riot. We’re not in the rockstar business—we want smart, collaborative, and creative team players. It’s always about players. If it needs to be about you, we’re not the right spot.
I might be biased, but this is my favorite on the list. Customer service is a skill that takes patience, dedication and perseverance, but it’s also a skill that can apply to almost every industry. Getting into this industry as a Customer Support Agent will give you an inside view of the companies you would like to start a career with – and with a company like 5CA, you’ll also have doors opening in other similar industries that you may find you enjoy more.

I recently got to “play test” a game for the first time. It was at an anime convention and they had a demo for it up and running. I found the game itself kind of slow and a little boring but when I clicked on the trees they would either disappear or, if they were dead, flicker back to life. I thought it was so cool that I immediately started looking for more bugs that the creator had missed, he was right at the table so it was easy to show it to him. I’m trying to choose a career with something I love and wanted to know more about this as an option. I’m interested in play testing but also in translation and programming. Those are all very different fields and I’m wondering what to expect from each one when it comes to jobs and requirements. If you could give me any insight it would be helpful.


This can vary widely depending on the specific team/project you are working on. I've placed some testers into roles where they literally are pushing buttons for an entire day waiting for an error to occur, and other roles where a tester is sitting right beside the game developers testing a game in real time as game code is being written.  There are some companies that work extreme hours in order to finish projects on time but from what I've seen over the years this is not as common as it used to be.  There always will be crunch time where you can expect to work some OT, but extended periods of OT for months on end are not that common anymore.
Hi Darren, I do not think it’s too late for you to start transitioning careers, there are plenty of examples of people chaining to the game industry as a second career. I have some specific advice on an episode of the podcast about how to transition to a new career in games, so check that out for sure. You also might like 10 proven ways to break into the game industry. I wish you luck!
QA testers sign non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) with their employers and can be fired or even sued for divulging information. All the testers we contacted spoke to us on condition of anonymity. We have given them pseudonyms to protect their identities. We have checked each of their credentials. We asked for comments from a variety of games publishers, but have received zero responses.
While this overwhelmingly looks like a gimmick, from your picture, Jason, to the e-book, this site has a lot of information and I hope it is true. I’ve done my homework and saw you were a part of Griptonite Games, which made largely handheld console games, which are based mostly on movies. Knowing this I am a bit skeptical because handheld games certainly can’t be as difficult to make as console games, and games based on movies are notorious for being bad. So how would you know about joining those big companies, or making “big” games? To be honest, I never heard of Griptonite Games until just now. Could you ease my skepticism here?
I read all of your post and since I've worked for Nexon, I know what is meaning working as a Quality Assurance in a serious place. It's not just playing the game... Sometimes it could be very tiring, especially when you are forced to test a game that you don't like for over 1 or more years. Otherwise, I wish to you all a huge luck for your future experience as a Game Tester/QA.

Welcome to the Gaming remote, part-time, freelance, and flexible jobs page! The gaming industry, also referred to as the interactive entertainment industry, is one of the world's fastest growing industries. Offering jobs in both technical and business related areas; the gaming industry provides employment opportunities for people of varying backgrounds and interests. Technical job titles in this category include game tester, forum administrator, programmer, designer, level designer, production worker, support worker, writer and audio artist. For business professionals, the gaming industry offers jobs with titles such as producer, marketing manager, market research analyst and sales representative. In addition to video game producers; educational companies, companies in the gambling industry, corporations and advertising companies need gaming experts. Gaming jobs often include flexible aspects such as part-time, freelance and telecommuting options. See below for the latest flexible and remote gaming jobs!
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