The Community Manager will serve as the vital link between our company and its global community of game developers and designers, NGOs, funders, and businesses using games to catalyze change across sectors from health and education to social justice and the environment. The Community Manager often serves as the first point of contact, helping establish and maintain our organization’s brand vision and experience.
Video games are a major part of the UK’s screen entertainment industry. Games are everywhere, from phones, tablets, PCs, consoles and virtual reality headsets (VR). This exciting industry blends creative talents, from artists to technicians. Game development can be a highly complex process often lasting up to two years and requiring teams of programmers, designers, artists, writers, musicians, and even actors. Whether supported by multi-million-pound investment for a flagship console game, or a micro team working from home on a mobile game, developers can achieve great success. The computer games market is highly competitive and subject to seasonal peaks, and launch dates that need to be met.
Hello, I’m 16 and I have been playing video games for as long as i can remember. I enjoy playing games for hours on end, I also enjoy finding bugs in games that are in closed Betas. I have found numerous bugs on League of legends PBE, Overwatch Open Beta, Even found a few on big name games like Halo and Call of duty. I have reported all of these bugs and have gotten them fixed because of me finding them. I do not even know how or where i would even start to pursue a career in this field.I am determined to get a job as a game tester because of my love for video games. I would highly appreciate if you could give me a rundown on where to start, What requirements i need, Where i need to go and a overall estimate on how much this would cost me. Thank you very much!
I really like video games but I have a short attention span because I have ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder it doesn’t bother me when I am playing games only when I am doing other things like writing or reading I am an excellent reader but not a great writer I really want to be a video game tester I already try to find bugs and glitches in the games I play it helps to lengthen the game I have medicine that I take for it but it makes me a bit A-social I don’t get aggressive or any thing like that but I can be kinda shy would that be a problem.
Hey Jason, I really hope you reply to this because I can use the advice. I’ve been playing games since I was about 8 and ever since I love pointing out glitches and bugs. Because of this I would love to become a game/QA tester. Unfortunately I’ve been looking for advice online to find colleges for a while now, and I’m running around in circles. If you email me I would be able to get into more detail and information about my situation. I greatly appreciate any advice you give me, thank you.
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: German (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia less more
As the global leader in licensed sports merchandise, Fanatics is changing the way fans purchase their favorite team merchandise by partnering with top leagues, clubs and soccer brands worldwide to offer the largest collection of timeless and timely gear from every pro and college team online, on your phone, in stadiums or on-site at the world’s biggest sporting events. A top 50 Internet Retailer Company, Fanatics comprises the broadest online assortment by offering hundreds of thousands of officially licensed items via its Fanatics ( www.fanatics.com ), FansEdge (www.fansedge.com ) and Kitbag ( www.kitbag.com ) brands, as well as the largest selection of sports collectibles and memorabilia through Fanatics Authentic ( www.fanaticsauthentic.com ). A multi-channel company, Fanatics operates more than 300 online and offline stores, including the e-commerce business for all major professional sports leagues (NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, NASCAR, MLS, PGA), major media brands (NBC Sports, CBS Sports, FOX Sports) and more than 200 collegiate and professional team properties, which include several of the biggest global soccer clubs (Manchester United, Real Madrid, Chelsea, Manchester City). The company's in-venue and event retail portfolio includes the NBA, NHL, NASCAR, Wimbledon, Kentucky Derby, The Ryder Cup, Manchester City, Texas Longhorns, Pittsburgh Pirates and New Jersey Devils, allowing fans to experience a seamless shopping experience across online, mobile and physical store locations.

:Looking for Temporary Teaching AssistantsWorking Hours: Retail hours (3-5 days including weekends) Working Duration: November for 6 monthsWorking Location: Novena /Jurong East/CCK/Tampines/Marina ParadeSalary: $8.50/hJob Scope:o being at the 2T reporting station and/or classroom 10 minutes before class startso receiving students when they arrive for classo helping students to settle dow ...
Video game testers usually don't require any formal qualifications, although some knowledge of standard office software will be handy. This doesn't mean that some testers don't have BTECs or even degrees in computer games design, but these qualifications aren't necessary, although they can be helpful. Testers do need patience, discipline, organisation and persistence, because playing video games as a job isn't like playing video games on your own time.
Grammar check and spell check your resume. That's a personal pet peeve of mine and many hiring managers I work with.  Someone that applies for a testing role but can't catch spelling or grammatical errors in their own resume is usually passed over.  Writing bug reports is a large part of a game tester's job, and developers and test managers don't have the time to guess what you meant.
I really like video games but I have a short attention span because I have ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder it doesn’t bother me when I am playing games only when I am doing other things like writing or reading I am an excellent reader but not a great writer I really want to be a video game tester I already try to find bugs and glitches in the games I play it helps to lengthen the game I have medicine that I take for it but it makes me a bit A-social I don’t get aggressive or any thing like that but I can be kinda shy would that be a problem.
The Community Manager will serve as the vital link between our company and its global community of game developers and designers, NGOs, funders, and businesses using games to catalyze change across sectors from health and education to social justice and the environment. The Community Manager often serves as the first point of contact, helping establish and maintain our organization’s brand vision and experience.
While this overwhelmingly looks like a gimmick, from your picture, Jason, to the e-book, this site has a lot of information and I hope it is true. I’ve done my homework and saw you were a part of Griptonite Games, which made largely handheld console games, which are based mostly on movies. Knowing this I am a bit skeptical because handheld games certainly can’t be as difficult to make as console games, and games based on movies are notorious for being bad. So how would you know about joining those big companies, or making “big” games? To be honest, I never heard of Griptonite Games until just now. Could you ease my skepticism here?

Hi Brian, it’s great that you’re thinking of turning your love of games into a career. To get hired by a game studio, you need to have some skills that they’re looking for – usually either art, programming, design, or production. If you don’t have any of those skills then you might be able to get a job as a QA tester, but as you mentioned, you’d need to move to a city that has game studios.
Hi Roman – if you’re old enough to get a job, you have a lot of experience playing games, and you have a good work ethic? Then yes, you might have a good shot at getting a job as a game tester. You may not be able to get a job at the specific company right away, any testing job will help you get started. But it doesn’t hurt to try – why not apply for the job?
For example, a large multiplayer online game might have 10,000 different areas that players can explore over several years of play. It would be impossible to test all of those areas manually, every time a new build of the game is created. So instead of doing it manually, an SDET might write a test program that quickly moves the player character to each one of the 10,000 areas for a few seconds each. That’s way faster than a human tester could ever do it manually.

A video game job goes far beyond just creating or testing games for a Wii, Xbox or Playstation, to name a few. Professionals are needed to create games for computers, hand-held devices, mobile devices, and through social media networks, as well as the traditional gaming systems. But the industry needs workers who do more than just create the games. There are numerous job opportunities and positions in the gaming industry, including these positions, according to Mencher:


You’ll never need to buy your own equipment, because the game company you work for will provide you with a computer, the game system(s), and any other hardware or software you might need to do your job. Often, you’ll be using a “dev kit” version of the game system, which is a specially-modified version of the hardware that allows developers to debug their games while they create them. Dev kits are often provided to game studios even before the hardware is announced to the public, so only official game studios — and you, if you have a job there — will have access to them.
Before you change your major, I think you should try taking an online programming class to see if you like programming. (CodeSchool has some great classes, and they’re inexpensive – maybe try their JavaScript classes.) If you find out that programming is interesting for you once you spend a few hours learning it, then you might consider changing your major.
i practically live and breathe video games. I can talk about them for hours. (ask my boyfriend.) when people tell me that they never got into video games it almost breaks my heart a little bit. but, I am going to college, and since I’d like to have my career based around video games whether it would be designing them, programming, or testing them, what kind of classes should I take? 3D animation? graphic design? does it all depend? I would love to make this into a career so I would like to be able to have some degrees and proper knowledge to make my resume more impressive, and eventually climb the ladder.
I finished High-school in June this year. I’ve decided to build my life around gaming, and I’m having trouble doing so. Considering a very popular method right now is streaming, and video to sources like twitch, youtube, etc… I’ve done a bit of that to no avail; due to the fact that most of those sources require a huge fan base to even partner with them, let alone get payed.
I finished High-school in June this year. I’ve decided to build my life around gaming, and I’m having trouble doing so. Considering a very popular method right now is streaming, and video to sources like twitch, youtube, etc… I’ve done a bit of that to no avail; due to the fact that most of those sources require a huge fan base to even partner with them, let alone get payed.
Thank you for this informative site, i am a frustrated mother of an 8 year old. My son is only allowed to play video games during the weekend and on a non busy day he can play for 3-5 hours. In two 3 hour sessions he can clear a game. Is this Normal? I know every parent thinks their child is special, I am a realistic person, although he is adorable, I just don't know enough about games. We have x-box, PS3, WIi, DSI and PS2. I am sure I make most parents cringe but we let him play Call of Duty, Red Dead redemption, Modern Warfare, James Bond eagle eye, halo, Simpsons and ect. No matter the level he's done it just 2 days! He's been doing it since he was 4, so we have became pros a game renting since the challenge is a breeze. I don't think a game tester is place for an 8 year old, I just don't know if we should be trying improve a skill I find a tad annoying but something he is good at and enjoys doing. I am not game savvy, so clearly he doesn't get it from me, I just don't know how to challenge him or direct him for a possible gaming future!
I started this website because there’s very little information out there about how video game companies work on the inside, or how to get started in the industry. I’ve spent literally hundreds of hours, of my own personal time, to write dozens of articles to give you insight into making games as a career. And here they all are, all of them, for free. FOR FREE!
This is one reason why it’s best to try and get a full-time employment (“FTE”) testing job at an established game company. Most regions require that employers provide medical benefits to their full-time employees, so it’s often a safer way to go. If you can’t find and FTE job initially, you may want to consider working as a temp at first, just to learn the job and get some experience on your resume.

While this overwhelmingly looks like a gimmick, from your picture, Jason, to the e-book, this site has a lot of information and I hope it is true. I’ve done my homework and saw you were a part of Griptonite Games, which made largely handheld console games, which are based mostly on movies. Knowing this I am a bit skeptical because handheld games certainly can’t be as difficult to make as console games, and games based on movies are notorious for being bad. So how would you know about joining those big companies, or making “big” games? To be honest, I never heard of Griptonite Games until just now. Could you ease my skepticism here?
Hi, I’m in my first semester in college now and I was thinking about going into gaming since I’ve been playing games for a long time since I can remember. I am thinking about changing my major into something like programming, but I never took a class in high school that was computer oriented and such. I was wondering do you think it would be a good idea to go ahead and change my major or not since I don’t really know about programming?
I play games all day it is my own personal therapy and passion,I teach other gamers and explore all aspects of the game I am playing. I find all there is to do and secrets to find then move on to the next game. My question to you is how can I make a living doing this, I spend so much time and dedication playing games,I feel I should get paid! Please send me some guidelines to help me get started on this path. Thank you for your time.
Not necessarily, because testing games can be quite different from testing business software. Doing ad-hoc testing of game clients doesn’t well prepare you for a different job writing test automation for Java servers, for example. But it will familiarize you with the software development process, and you’ll get practice reproducing, reporting and regressing bugs.
Hi Nafis, if you already know how to program, then you should practice programming video games and start building a portfolio of small game demos. You can apply for game jobs just the same way you apply for any job: Search the Internet or game studio websites to find the job openings, read the requirements to see if you fit 80% of the requirements listed, and then follow the instructions to apply.
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- Hello, my name is Christian Bradley. I'll be your guide for this course on careers in the game industry. The video game industry has expanded to include AAA development studios, independent development teams, mobile app developers, and one man any studios. From the outside, each of these environments looks very different. This course is designed to help you understand the key skills that are common to all game development and how you can gain the experience you need to take your first steps in the industry. We'll talk about how game studios are structured, how games are financed and distributed, how programmers, artists, designers, and other professionals contribute to a game's design and development, and lastly, the specific skills that each of these professions require. So, if you're ready, let's take a look at careers in the game industry.
Though the industry doesn't pay well for entry-level positions, what about more seasoned QA testers? Danny says, "I work with a guy who has spent the last eight years keeping his nose clean, never in fights with leadership, does whatever is asked of him, and is a freaking QA Ninja when it comes to PC testing. After eight years, he is still paid $14 an hour. I just think we're worth a whole heck of a lot more than $10 an hour." He believes that game developers/publishers should "offer some benefits like they do the rest of the company".

very helpful article. i personally love breaking games and finding bugs. i just love to find those bugs that the developers/programmers didnt think of being possible or consider happening. just to find one and say “this is a game breaking bug, here is a way you could fix it” makes me happy because it might help keep another player from experiencing that bug and ruining there experience of the game. the mere fact that i sit playing games the first time through enjoying them and then going back and trying to break them for fun kind of qualifies me or places me in the area for QA game tester already but that doesnt mean much as i cant find anywhere to apply for such a job. i know minor programming and can give details on how to fix bugs in a way a programmer might understand better than the regular person testing the game without the knowledge. it’s just saddening for me that i have been searching for about 3 years now for somewhere to apply for this type of job. i truly have a passion for it, even though it’s considered a tedious job at times, i still love it.


If you are searching for a career that lets you work from your own home, then look to the video game industry. While some game testers will work in-house for major companies, work from home is a very common practice. This means that many testers have no daily schedule and no boss hovering over their work. However, once an assignment is given, you are expected to meet specific deadlines. How you meet those deadlines is entirely up to you. Often the game developer will set individual milestones, breaking down the work into smaller segments.
I am a gaming fanatic and a big gaming freak too. I am now 17 in India doing my 12th. I want to start my career in gaming industry by game testing. I have already started writing stories and idea for my games. I currently have 12 game Ideas out of which 9 don’t exist in gaming. So will I be a success in the industry. BTW I am also writing a book, I don’t know If it will help.
Are you passionate about gaming? Do you have excellent programming skills? Do you like being creative and working with the best developers, artists, and game designers from the industry? Do you enjoy solving technical challenges in mobile gaming and bringing mobile games to the next level? Then read on because you might just be the developer we're looking for.
Before you change your major, I think you should try taking an online programming class to see if you like programming. (CodeSchool has some great classes, and they’re inexpensive – maybe try their JavaScript classes.) If you find out that programming is interesting for you once you spend a few hours learning it, then you might consider changing your major.
Hello, sir. I am a young student going into his first year of college next fall. Although I am majoring in Mechanical Engineering (its a well paying job source), I have alot of interest in video game design. I am a bit inexperienced with terms, but I would eventually like to pursue a field of design in which I could help create worlds and sandboxes for games. Whether it be the single player cinematics of worlds like Skyrim or the Multiplayer arenas of Halo. In high school I took many classes in AutoCAD, Architecture and Technical. Using programs to 3D model objects and areas was a thrill! Game tools like Halo’s “Forge”mode really have me Iinterested In map designing for video games one day. Your article addresses becoming a videogame tester as an entry level position. What advice could you lend to me for a goal that I cannot even properly name yet? Also, most of those big cities are not in the Michigan area, so I worry for my chances of getting a job anytime soon…. anyways, thank you for your article. It was a good read and very imformational.
Ok, I am 20 years old. I have been playing games before I could walk. (Literally, I was sitting on my dads lap clicking around and “playing” the best I could as a toddler, Starcraft lol) No one on my family is as passionate about gaming as I am. Its no addiction or unhealthy because I control my weight, take care of my eyes/lighting, and take breaks. I immerse myself into the game. Replying games in different ways, especially free roam/open world games, and role play even. I was told once, “There is a whole world out there man, stop sitting in there playing games” to which I replied that “I have seen more worlds and lived more lives in my games that you may never experiance.” I am always promoting games I enjoy and recommed them. I convince people to at least trt demos/trials or view videos at least to see. I get excited for new games, and saddened when I beat title/franchise I put years into. (Mass Effect is one) My question/comment whatever you may see this as, is this. I do not hardly know anything about computers. Coding and modding is beyond my skills. However I do tell people what ideas I would like to see implemented, what bugs there is at times, I can play a whole day away besides eating,sleeping, etc if time permits, and I have ideas of worlds, languages, characters, and more all in my head. That I thought up. Some may be based off of races/worlds/names of other things but never exact. But I am terrible at art. I can not draw. I have all these ideas and said if I could put them on paper or on a computer I could be rich and bring whole new life to games. I am scared to shoot for a testing job and work in college only to fail out use lack of computing skills and art skills. I have a vivid immagination. I can look around my home state and turn it futuristic ot post apocolyptic or alien without even closing my eyes. No exaggeration. Advice? Wisdom? Anything. I have often thought (sadly I might add) of getting rid of games and “growing up” like everyone tells me to, but I want to give back o other games and become a designer or dev even someday. But afraid to mess up. Should I go with a normal mundane job, or risk it? Help me out peeps, ima gamer, ima nerd, a trekkie/trekker, harry potter lover, lord of the rings follower, star wars fanboy. In essence, im your peer xD advice?

Or, to put it in other terms, rather than sitting around playing games all day, you'll be sitting around playing the same part of a game over and over. And not the climactic boss fight, either – at least, not necessarily. You're just as likely to be assigned to make sure that the different sections of the pause menu work in all different areas of the game.
“I used to think I was super lucky, but then I realized that those hours I spent every week on the gaming club at Emerson watching eSports, following League of Legends and playing video games were all a part of it,” she says. “Many people might not think of that as professional experience, but it’s the same thing as a film major who watches a lot of movies.”
Good at playing games and know some other languages? We need you!RecruitFirst is hiring 3 x Game Testers! You will be outsourced to our client to play and translate current popular games on the market!Location: IslandwidePay: $8 /hrDuration: 2 - 3 monthsWorking Hours: Mon to Fri 9am - 6pm (negotiable)What you need to do:- identify and document bugs in the games- run tests and spot grammar mistakes ...
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