Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: Polish (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia less more


Work at a company that has friendly, fun, nice people working there. You may be working very long hours for days or weeks before each game release, which will be much more enjoyable if the people you’re working with aren’t jerks. Research the studio on Glassdoor.com, and ask people who may have worked there in the past. Avoid companies that seem to be full of jerks.
QA testers sign non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) with their employers and can be fired or even sued for divulging information. All the testers we contacted spoke to us on condition of anonymity. We have given them pseudonyms to protect their identities. We have checked each of their credentials. We asked for comments from a variety of games publishers, but have received zero responses.
Most companies do not have a formal process for selecting a Lead Tester. If you want to progress in your career, then you should do great work and help your leads accomplish their goals for the project. Always work to take on more responsibility. If your leads come to see you as a hard worker who is capable of more responsibility, then they may promote you next time there’s an opening for a lead tester position.
Hi Brian, it’s great that you’re thinking of turning your love of games into a career. To get hired by a game studio, you need to have some skills that they’re looking for – usually either art, programming, design, or production. If you don’t have any of those skills then you might be able to get a job as a QA tester, but as you mentioned, you’d need to move to a city that has game studios.
I’ve been playing games for the majority of my life. Even so much that it interfered with my classes to the point of me just getting a G.E.D. Needless to say I dont have much schooling but I tend to look for bugs in games almost everyday. Recently I began editing and modding games using C+ programming and have a bit of experience with it. Would it still be possible for me to be a tester or would I need to go back to school.
Hi Jason, I seem to find myself in a predicament. Currently I am moving on to my senior year at Penn State and I need a new major. I was pursuing Computer Engineering, but programming and I do not get along very well (Once you go past “if” statements I’m Lost). So my first question is, what majors are good for entering the game industry, that don’t involve programming. My next question is about finding an entry-level position that I can learn on the job. I used your job search tool that you provided and most jobs seemed to require previous experience, any suggestions there?
Hi Daniel, a job testing games is like any other job: the company will post a job opening online, and then you can apply for it. You’ll want to do some research to learn as much as you can about game/software testing to help you get jobs easier, you can find lots of information here on this website or you can get a copy of my book on game testing if you’re interested.

There don’t seem to be very many entry level Quality Assurance Tester job available. The few i’ve seen want at least 6 months experience and previous knowledge. Both of which I lack. I’m disabled and have no choice but to work from home. All the job postings i’ve seen are on site only. Oh well, that’s how every entry level job i’ve tried to look into ends up: a dead end of on site jobs. I guess i’ll just try applying for SSI again.
HI, I noticed that most of you guys, if not all of you are adults. Well I am in 8th grade. I play video games whenever I can. Some days not at all, other up to 6 hrs. My dad doesn’t support my love for games at all. My mom isn’t as bad but still she wont be pleased, because I haven’t told them that I want to be a video game tester. I would like you guys to give me some about were I should go or what I should do to accomplish this. By the way I live in California by UC Irvine collage.
You can take pride in working for the employer of choice in the communities where we do business. You'll participate in a culture that treats all employees with respect, encourages their growth and development, and rewards excellence. Your thoughts and ideas are welcome here. We want to hear every fresh approach and new experience. If you find that appealing, then IGT could be the place for you.  We look forward to meeting you!
Learn how to become a game tester with my book, Land a Job as a Video Game Tester. You’ll learn the basics of game testing, and all the steps to apply, interview, and accept job offers. I worked hard to write a book that provides everything you need to know to get a job testing games, but if I missed anything then you should email me and I’ll answer any remaining questions you may have. read it
Hi Stephen, you aren’t convinced by my articles on game developer salary, which are well-cited? And not by my interviews with game industry veterans from giant game teams like Assassin’s Creed, Forza Motorsports, Project Spark, and mega-hits like Plants vs. Zombies? Or by all my articles on interviewing at game companies, based on many years of experience as a hiring manager? Then I’m afraid you can’t be convinced.
Using concept art as reference, 3D modeling artists create the 3D objects, buildings and characters needed for a game. They can use a variety of software tools including Maya, Modo and Z-Brush. The technical constraints of the game must be kept in mind, for example, the poly count for each object and scene and the size of the textures for each 3D object.
According to the Gamasutra Salary Survey of 2014, the online publication for Game Developer Magazine, the average salary for testers is about $54,833 annually. The same study found that testers with over three years of experience average roughly $48,426 a year. If you work for over six years, you can expect to reach an average of $62,885 a year, and those with a master’s degree earned on average $65,000.
I have found this to be one of the easiest and most fun ways to make money online today (mostly because I get to spend more time with my family and hangout with friends and still have time for my other hobbies beside playing video games). You can have this life too. Start NOW by putting your first name and email address in the box above and click 'Continue' to get started.
The Quest for Your Career series can help. Each week, we’ll focus on one of nearly 30 jobs in the video game industry across several job families including art, design, programming, testing, production, and more. Each interview features an experienced industry veteran who tells all about what the job is, what it takes, and how you can start preparing right now.
so iv loved gameing since i was little and i play about 40 hours a week. i just never get bored of them. the question i have is i want to become a tester first so i can get some feel for the gaming industries before i go ahead and start trying to do a degree in game design and programing. the closest school to me is art instutute of wasington. wich is acouple of hours away. the ting i want to know is im not that i cant draw all that well to be honest. how would that effect on getting a degree in this field.
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Hi Jason, I seem to find myself in a predicament. Currently I am moving on to my senior year at Penn State and I need a new major. I was pursuing Computer Engineering, but programming and I do not get along very well (Once you go past “if” statements I’m Lost). So my first question is, what majors are good for entering the game industry, that don’t involve programming. My next question is about finding an entry-level position that I can learn on the job. I used your job search tool that you provided and most jobs seemed to require previous experience, any suggestions there?

Thanks you for your articles ,they helped me choose my career . I am truly indebted to you .So I wanna become a programmer and I think that I will start my career as a QA tester.im currently 16 and have played quite a few games .So can I start testing games online and what do I have to do for the basics . Also can you suggest me some programming languages essential for my game development career which I can learn right now . And which country ( particularly city ) would be best to go for my career , cause I was thinking of going to USA .Thanks
When you’re looking at job postings, keep in mind that many employers will still consider candidates even if they only have around 80% of the qualifications. Watch carefully for postings that say things like “2 years experience required, or equivalent experience” because often times college or independent game development is good enough to get an interview.
Interested in turning your love of video games into a career? This course will introduce you to the concepts and skills required to make it in the modern game industry—whether you want to build and finance your own game or land a job at a triple-A studio, with an indie team, or in mobile gaming. Learn about the history of video games, the structure of a typical game studio, the distribution paths for different types of games, marketing trends, the various roles (both artistic and technical), and the skills you need for each job. Christian Bradley provides practical, real-world advice about the game industry, and tips for getting your foot in the door. Plus, explore the courses and learning paths we offer to help get you started.
hi i am a 21 yr old young man who loves to play games,,,i have done graduation in electrical engg,, and now i am employed in a company as an engineer,,,when i came back off from duty then i just like to spend all the remaining time in playing video games,,,i mainly play on my xbox 360 and on ps3 too,,,from my point of view i think that i am a very good player,,,playing games when i was only 8,,,well i heard about the game testing in a site,,which says that u are get to paid only by testing games which are yet to strike the market,,,i thought earlier that they were spams but after a quite research things changed for me,,,so now i want to become a game tester if i can get the oppurtunity,,,,i am a good gamer and only satisfied when i completes every game to its 100%,,,i have played many times of games like arcade,,shooting like call of duty 1,2,3 mw-1,mw-2,black ops,mw-3(new one) to role playing games like assassin's creed every part to 100% syncronisation,have all the save data for the proof to,,,and specially like strategic games like king's bounty,age of empires etc,,,so i want to know that with my capabilities and a will to play can i become a game tester??
Testers don’t normally need to travel very often, but it depends on what kind of company you’re working for. If you end up being a tester on a project that’s developed in a different town than where you’re testing it – for example if you’re working for a publisher in San Francisco but the developer is in Seattle – then you might need to travel occasionally. If you can’t travel for some reason, it’s probably not a deal-breaker for most testing companies.

Hi Jacob, your first stop when looking for game studios in a given location should be GameDevMap.com. It’s a crowd-sourced list of studios. I can see that there are over a dozen developers and publishers there, but I don’t see any of the “giant” companies you mentioned – but that’s okay, because you don’t need to target the big, famous developers for your first job. Start wherever you can, build your experience, and then you can move elsewhere later on. Good luck!
You’ve heard of Blizzard Entertainment, right? They are the incredibly successful company behind games like “World of Warcraft,” “Heroes of the Storm,” “Overwatch,” and “Starcraft”. Blizzard Entertainment has so many ISTQB certified software testers that they are an ISTQB Platinum Partner through ASTQB, the American Software Testing Qualifications Board (this site). This demonstrates Blizzard Entertainment’s commitment to ISTQB software testing certification for their software quality. Think about that.

I was searching for job like this.. honestly, this type of jobs is my dream, first thing that i known about how to become game tester is the passion on playing a games. I know, the main jobs of the game tester is searching bugs/glitches from the game. A real gamers still can’t be the game tester if he/she can’t focus on searhcing bugs on the games that they’ve played. Now, let me introduce myself.. I’m not a good programer, I’m not a skilled person that can drawing something manual or using computer, but i had experience about game tester that i learned from internet. A bit of story from me, I only had a laptop with bad specs, but i always want to play games. So i setting my pc until i can play a games work on 60fps, but from that, i got some experience especially on focus when playing a games. One thing that important to be a game tester is focusing to search any bugs on games. And then, the most important after focus on searching bugs on games is reporting the bugs that i’ve found. The report must be detailed, so the programmer of the games can fix the bugs from the tester found. Please reply this message Mr. Jason, i just want to get job that same as my hobby.. and that is be a “Game Tester” Thank You..


Hi I just wanted to say I know gaming world is not easy but work job isnt I love playing game I love writing I love find patches in every game I play and I usually not that easy… but I tend to have fun with it im not going to say im the best or anything like that but im pretty good at what I do im barely 18 and I love to work . Ive always wanted to a game taster but never really understood how to do so … but I have a few questions on how everything works but I am a hard worker and fun to know and talk to … it hard to work away from home because im a single father of a one year old and I’d to work from home so I could raise him and work at the same time … what would be a good way for me to get into the gaming industry?
We often get this question: “What’s next after ISTQB Foundation Level certification if I want to really stand out?” If you want to test apps, you’ll also want ASTQB’s Mobile Testing Certification. And you can impress companies even more with your ISTQB Agile Testing Certification. But those are optional, simple next steps. Start with the easy first step of getting your ISTQB Foundation Level certification with the information below or if you need help, by taking an accredited software testing training course.
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I’ve been playing games since I was two, and have participated in beta-tests as long as I can remember. More specifically; I’ve participated in beta-tests nearly every new game release there’s been in the past 12 years. I’m 18, so it’s legal for me to work in most places, It’s just a matter of finding the company with an open or will be open position as a qa tester, that is lenient on distance to the physical work place.


Hey Jason, I really hope you reply to this because I can use the advice. I’ve been playing games since I was about 8 and ever since I love pointing out glitches and bugs. Because of this I would love to become a game/QA tester. Unfortunately I’ve been looking for advice online to find colleges for a while now, and I’m running around in circles. If you email me I would be able to get into more detail and information about my situation. I greatly appreciate any advice you give me, thank you.
We often get this question: “What’s next after ISTQB Foundation Level certification if I want to really stand out?” If you want to test apps, you’ll also want ASTQB’s Mobile Testing Certification. And you can impress companies even more with your ISTQB Agile Testing Certification. But those are optional, simple next steps. Start with the easy first step of getting your ISTQB Foundation Level certification with the information below or if you need help, by taking an accredited software testing training course.

I started this website because there’s very little information out there about how video game companies work on the inside, or how to get started in the industry. I’ve spent literally hundreds of hours, of my own personal time, to write dozens of articles to give you insight into making games as a career. And here they all are, all of them, for free. FOR FREE!


Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: Polish (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia less more
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