I started this website because there’s very little information out there about how video game companies work on the inside, or how to get started in the industry. I’ve spent literally hundreds of hours, of my own personal time, to write dozens of articles to give you insight into making games as a career. And here they all are, all of them, for free. FOR FREE!
i practically live and breathe video games. I can talk about them for hours. (ask my boyfriend.) when people tell me that they never got into video games it almost breaks my heart a little bit. but, I am going to college, and since I’d like to have my career based around video games whether it would be designing them, programming, or testing them, what kind of classes should I take? 3D animation? graphic design? does it all depend? I would love to make this into a career so I would like to be able to have some degrees and proper knowledge to make my resume more impressive, and eventually climb the ladder.
I’m looking into becoming a game tester I live in Williams lake BC not sure how bout to do it I love video games and I do know most time game testings is for hugs and can be very tedious job writing reports more then game at times but its something I would love Tod do I don’t care bout the pay I just want to work for the company and the games not the pay the isnt essential for me my passion to make the games the best they can be is so any advice how to go bout this would be awesome
Do you find that extra hour, no matter your day, to squeeze in one more game? Do you lose yourself in interactive worlds? When you’re not playing games, are you strategizing ways to increase your win rate or solve that final puzzle? If yes, you’re a gamer. Whatever you play, if you make time to play, you’re a gamer. We believe that when you bring a passion for gaming, you’ll be able to empathize with player joy and player pain to help us make better, player-focused decisions.
Compounding the physical and mental stresses that QA testers endure was the complete lack of job security. "During training, they told us it's not a matter of 'if' you'll be laid-off but 'when'," says Keith. "They flat-out tell you that what makes a good employee is the number of bugs you find and it is this number that will determine if you are kept on or not." This methodology, however, did not accurately take into account the quality of dedication that went into a project. "Here I was recreating and logging how to get stuck in the tail of a helicopter. I would have other testers comment on how much they liked my bugs, because I was one of those guys who would be able to reproduce those bugs that stumped everyone else, but when it came to the end of the project, the guy next to me had more bugs, so I was laid-off and he was not."


Every model or character in a game will need to be textured. One of the skills of a texture artist is to put detail into each 3D model’s textures, with the smallest amount of data. Simple “flat” textures make 3D objects look fake. Adding imperfections to perfect textures is one of the tricks a texture artist can use to make 3D environments and objects look real.


Interested in turning your love of video games into a career? This course will introduce you to the concepts and skills required to make it in the modern game industry—whether you want to build and finance your own game or land a job at a triple-A studio, with an indie team, or in mobile gaming. Learn about the history of video games, the structure of a typical game studio, the distribution paths for different types of games, marketing trends, the various roles (both artistic and technical), and the skills you need for each job. Christian Bradley provides practical, real-world advice about the game industry, and tips for getting your foot in the door. Plus, explore the courses and learning paths we offer to help get you started.
Hey Jason, I really hope you reply to this because I can use the advice. I’ve been playing games since I was about 8 and ever since I love pointing out glitches and bugs. Because of this I would love to become a game/QA tester. Unfortunately I’ve been looking for advice online to find colleges for a while now, and I’m running around in circles. If you email me I would be able to get into more detail and information about my situation. I greatly appreciate any advice you give me, thank you.

Every model or character in a game will need to be textured. One of the skills of a texture artist is to put detail into each 3D model’s textures, with the smallest amount of data. Simple “flat” textures make 3D objects look fake. Adding imperfections to perfect textures is one of the tricks a texture artist can use to make 3D environments and objects look real.
I recently got to “play test” a game for the first time. It was at an anime convention and they had a demo for it up and running. I found the game itself kind of slow and a little boring but when I clicked on the trees they would either disappear or, if they were dead, flicker back to life. I thought it was so cool that I immediately started looking for more bugs that the creator had missed, he was right at the table so it was easy to show it to him. I’m trying to choose a career with something I love and wanted to know more about this as an option. I’m interested in play testing but also in translation and programming. Those are all very different fields and I’m wondering what to expect from each one when it comes to jobs and requirements. If you could give me any insight it would be helpful.
It might surprise you to learn that strong writing and communication skills are essential for a good video game tester. The ability to write in a clear, brief, and effective manner will help you describe the glitches you find and how you found them. Your clear writing will give developers a clear path to addressing the issue and creating a fix. You don’t have to be a poetic, colorful author; you need to be a clear, concise, and detailed communicator.
“I used to think I was super lucky, but then I realized that those hours I spent every week on the gaming club at Emerson watching eSports, following League of Legends and playing video games were all a part of it,” she says. “Many people might not think of that as professional experience, but it’s the same thing as a film major who watches a lot of movies.”

I have been playing games on the pc all the way back to the commodore 360. and have been playing all of my life. I am now 44 years old I have 6 classes before I graduate with my BS/IT/WD, The whole reason I went back to school was because I like to game and I wanted to get a job as a gamer (tester) I don’t want to get into the development side or the design side I just want to play games and do bug reports. Every site I have looked at all they want to do is sell me a book on how to be a tester. I don’t have the $$ to buy a book or a “plan” any tips on where I might go from here?
Hi Samuel, video game tester and video game designer are 2 very different jobs. So the first thing you should do is learn more about each one, and see if you can decide which one you’d like the most. You can get an overview of each at the game careers overviews article, and get a sense of what a “day in the life” is like at the game career interview articles.
Try to get involved with beta testing new games. Experience in open beta testing will give an indication of what testing work requires and can build up a résumé. Software companies often release open beta games to the public to get feedback and find glitches, usually providing guidelines on how to test them. Testing such games can expose you to identifying and isolating bugs, paying attention to small details, and writing reports.
Blizzard Entertainment is an Equal Opportunity Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by applicable law, and will not be discriminated against on the basis of disability.
Hi Tim, if you’re getting an Associates in Software Development then that’s a good ground to start out on. Here’s my advice: Build a very small game project while you’re in school, to use as a portfolio piece when you start looking for jobs. Then once you graduate, you can apply to jobs in other cities – just be prepared to move to a new city if you get a job offer. I wish you luck!
You make your own decisions. There are no unrealistic deadlines and nobody telling you how much to work. You get to decide how much you work, part-time, full-time or OVERTIME. Earn Up to $500-$3500 every month making a better than average income doing what you want, when you want. Get out of the rat race today! You get to decide because you have the freedom of working for yourself.

Game testers may also have to run through matrix testings. Matrix testing is often used in fighting games like Mortal Combat, Tekken, or Soul Calibur. Say a fighting game has 20 different characters and 20 different levels. When doing matrix testing, the video game tester would need to play as each character vs each character (including Character 1 vs Character 1) on all 20 levels. That’s 8,000 different matchups! That’s just one example of the highly-detailed, often monotonous work that video game testers have to do.
Online Game Tester charge a flat rate no matter how much you earn. Instead of charging 25-50% percentage of what you earn (like other companies do), we want to make a simple and cheap solution. The cost cover maintenance, creating the job database and partnerships with 2k, Rockstar etc, keeping our tools, software and content up-2-date, e-books worth over 49 USD, guides, video tutorials, life-time support and much more. We have tried to lower cost to a minimum.
Game testers may also have to run through matrix testings. Matrix testing is often used in fighting games like Mortal Combat, Tekken, or Soul Calibur. Say a fighting game has 20 different characters and 20 different levels. When doing matrix testing, the video game tester would need to play as each character vs each character (including Character 1 vs Character 1) on all 20 levels. That’s 8,000 different matchups! That’s just one example of the highly-detailed, often monotonous work that video game testers have to do.
i practically live and breathe video games. I can talk about them for hours. (ask my boyfriend.) when people tell me that they never got into video games it almost breaks my heart a little bit. but, I am going to college, and since I’d like to have my career based around video games whether it would be designing them, programming, or testing them, what kind of classes should I take? 3D animation? graphic design? does it all depend? I would love to make this into a career so I would like to be able to have some degrees and proper knowledge to make my resume more impressive, and eventually climb the ladder.
Today's teens—13 to 17-year-olds (Gen Z)—make up 27% of all gamers. One generation ahead of them are millennials (18 to 34-year-olds) who represent 29% of all gamers ("How Different Generations Play Video Games, From Platforms To Genres"). If you are a member of either of these generations, you may have thought, or even dreamt of, a career in the video game industry. Fortunately, there are many options from which to choose, both on the technical and business sides of this industry, that will take advantage of your passion for gaming.

Programmer: C/ C++, Assembly, Objective C (iPhone), Java (Blackberry & Web), JavaScript, PHP, Flash Development: Actionscript. Solid Object Oriented skills with ability to write fast, elegant, clean code. Specialization in Graphics, Artificial Intelligence, Networking (Client / Server), Sound, Physics, Math, or Tool development. Understanding of CPU/Memory optimization, 2D/3D animation systems, gameplay systems, or building a game framework library. A B.S. in Computer Science is always preferred.
As more technology becomes available to video game developers, the consumer market will expand to offer a wider range of products, thus creating jobs for all you hardcore gamers out there. After all, VR is only just getting started and there’s already over 1,100 VR supported games on Steam! Here’s a list of five video game jobs gamers might find interesting:

Funcom is looking to hire not 1 but 2 talented External Producers to handle the management of the company’s publishing projects. Opportunity locations: Raleigh, NC USA & Oslo, Norway The role’s responsibilities include the continuous communication with developers, the management of work pipelines, project finances, team management, internal and external resource management and the successful timely launch of the projects/titles.

We are a growing online gaming company and are currently looking for a part-time freelancer, to help with the research of our competitors. This will include following and documenting daily activities within these games. Requirements: - Have basic understanding and experience with Google docs/sheet/slides - Be available a few hours throughout the day - Have a computer and a mobile phone. less more
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