Hi,I am only 17year old but I’ve played so many games.Actually I’ve been playing since I was 5,and got my first gaming computer.I would love to play video games and be paid for it.I know that it’s not like that,but it’s harder than it sounds,but I searched it and I know what I have to deal with.I am spending arround 17-20hours per day just playing games,every type,I never get bored of it.The bad thing is that no one supports me and I live in a country that can’t provide games….So that’s how I ll never be a game tester.
Hi Robert, you’re right that there’s a lot to learn to be in the video game industry – but that’s the same with any industry. The sooner you start learning, the sooner you’ll get good at it. 🙂 A college degree isn’t required, but a degree or at least a certificate would help a lot when you’re applying for jobs. If you don’t know where to start, then I’d suggest maybe taking a game-related certificate from a local college if possible – it will teach you the basics, and help you start making a portfolio. Best of luck!
Hi Jacob, your first stop when looking for game studios in a given location should be GameDevMap.com. It’s a crowd-sourced list of studios. I can see that there are over a dozen developers and publishers there, but I don’t see any of the “giant” companies you mentioned – but that’s okay, because you don’t need to target the big, famous developers for your first job. Start wherever you can, build your experience, and then you can move elsewhere later on. Good luck!

I asked one of my friends who has run several QA groups over the years, and he’s heard good things about uTest. They provide a “crowdsourced” testing service, and he thinks that many of their QA employees work from home. But in general, if you want solid, full-time employment as a game tester, you won’t be able to work from home because nearly all game companies do not hire work-from-home testers. In fact, please be careful, because there are several scam websites that you need to watch out for. Learn more in my podcast about work from home testing scams. If it seems too good to be true… it is.
Ok, I am 20 years old. I have been playing games before I could walk. (Literally, I was sitting on my dads lap clicking around and “playing” the best I could as a toddler, Starcraft lol) No one on my family is as passionate about gaming as I am. Its no addiction or unhealthy because I control my weight, take care of my eyes/lighting, and take breaks. I immerse myself into the game. Replying games in different ways, especially free roam/open world games, and role play even. I was told once, “There is a whole world out there man, stop sitting in there playing games” to which I replied that “I have seen more worlds and lived more lives in my games that you may never experiance.” I am always promoting games I enjoy and recommed them. I convince people to at least trt demos/trials or view videos at least to see. I get excited for new games, and saddened when I beat title/franchise I put years into. (Mass Effect is one) My question/comment whatever you may see this as, is this. I do not hardly know anything about computers. Coding and modding is beyond my skills. However I do tell people what ideas I would like to see implemented, what bugs there is at times, I can play a whole day away besides eating,sleeping, etc if time permits, and I have ideas of worlds, languages, characters, and more all in my head. That I thought up. Some may be based off of races/worlds/names of other things but never exact. But I am terrible at art. I can not draw. I have all these ideas and said if I could put them on paper or on a computer I could be rich and bring whole new life to games. I am scared to shoot for a testing job and work in college only to fail out use lack of computing skills and art skills. I have a vivid immagination. I can look around my home state and turn it futuristic ot post apocolyptic or alien without even closing my eyes. No exaggeration. Advice? Wisdom? Anything. I have often thought (sadly I might add) of getting rid of games and “growing up” like everyone tells me to, but I want to give back o other games and become a designer or dev even someday. But afraid to mess up. Should I go with a normal mundane job, or risk it? Help me out peeps, ima gamer, ima nerd, a trekkie/trekker, harry potter lover, lord of the rings follower, star wars fanboy. In essence, im your peer xD advice?
Hi Tyffani, you seem very passionate about games, that’s awesome! There are lots of different careers, so you need to figure out which one(s) might “click” with your interests and talents. You could start by finding out whether you are more attracted to art, or to programming, or design. Check out the Quest for Your Career articles to learn more about each one – once you find something that sounds interesting, then you can start thinking about how to pursue it. Have fun!
Online Game Tester is a website, network and job database created by a team with a big passion for games, game developing, game designing as well as game testing and reviewing. We have a lot of knowledge and experience within game testing, QA testing, game designing and developing, and we want you to make money by playing new cool games! We help you to become a game tester the easy way! We have developed some custom tools and guides that would help you succeed as a game tester, and created a job database and network with easy access in cooperation with companies like Activision, Blizzard, 2k, Rockstar Games etc
Online Game Tester is a website, network and job database created by a team with a big passion for games, game developing, game designing as well as game testing and reviewing. We have a lot of knowledge and experience within game testing, QA testing, game designing and developing, and we want you to make money by playing new cool games! We help you to become a game tester the easy way! We have developed some custom tools and guides that would help you succeed as a game tester, and created a job database and network with easy access in cooperation with companies like Activision, Blizzard, 2k, Rockstar Games etc
I’m afraid I can’t help with financial advice. But as far as your game design goals, I think it will be hard to start a career in games in Alaska, because there aren’t any game studios up there that I know of. The closest US city with a strong game industry would be Seattle, so one strategy might be to move to Seattle and get a non-game job while you pursue a video game design certificate or degree. But you’d want to be sure that your health and finances are in order before making such a move. Be smart about it.
Well… All i do is gaming all i mostly ever wanted to do is game and it would be ARWSOME to be in the industry thats if there is one in New Zealand but if there is, i really want to just test game and do reports because i played games with a lot of bugs and i do make reports about them etc… But this is a job i would love to have!!! Sincerely – Harry Wilson McGill
Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?

Compounding the physical and mental stresses that QA testers endure was the complete lack of job security. "During training, they told us it's not a matter of 'if' you'll be laid-off but 'when'," says Keith. "They flat-out tell you that what makes a good employee is the number of bugs you find and it is this number that will determine if you are kept on or not." This methodology, however, did not accurately take into account the quality of dedication that went into a project. "Here I was recreating and logging how to get stuck in the tail of a helicopter. I would have other testers comment on how much they liked my bugs, because I was one of those guys who would be able to reproduce those bugs that stumped everyone else, but when it came to the end of the project, the guy next to me had more bugs, so I was laid-off and he was not."
Testing videos games is one of the most vital parts of the game development process. Game developers need people like you to test their games to make sure there are no glitches or problems with the gameplay, music, graphics and general workings of the game. These companies are investing millions in there games and can not afford to release a poor game. So don't "unvalue" your importance and worth as a game tester.
Hi. I am a 17 year old student from new zealand in my final year of high school. I have been playing video games since Crash Bandicoot came out on the Playstation 1 system, and back then I could find many bugs and errors with the game. I am looking for a job as a Video Game Tester, and I enjoy challenging environments, as well as repeating things in games over and over again, this coming from my Prince of Persia puzzle history with the original game. Is there any branches for large companies such as Bioware, Bethesda Game Studios or EA in new zealand? or will I have to search outside of the country?

very helpful article. i personally love breaking games and finding bugs. i just love to find those bugs that the developers/programmers didnt think of being possible or consider happening. just to find one and say “this is a game breaking bug, here is a way you could fix it” makes me happy because it might help keep another player from experiencing that bug and ruining there experience of the game. the mere fact that i sit playing games the first time through enjoying them and then going back and trying to break them for fun kind of qualifies me or places me in the area for QA game tester already but that doesnt mean much as i cant find anywhere to apply for such a job. i know minor programming and can give details on how to fix bugs in a way a programmer might understand better than the regular person testing the game without the knowledge. it’s just saddening for me that i have been searching for about 3 years now for somewhere to apply for this type of job. i truly have a passion for it, even though it’s considered a tedious job at times, i still love it.


If the idea of moving to a different city (or even a different country) freaks you out, I urge you to keep an open mind. Many people move to a new town to start their first video game job, so there’s already a support network in place to help you out. The company that’s hiring you might even offer financial assistance to help you with your moving costs.
Hi Kyler, most game testing jobs don’t require a degree unless they also require some computer programming skills. In high school, I’d recommend taking some computer classes, maybe a programming class, and technical writing. (Or whichever equivalents your school might offer.) Many people move away from their home town to get a job after school, it’s normal to move to a new city where there are more jobs in your field.
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Hi Jason, I seem to find myself in a predicament. Currently I am moving on to my senior year at Penn State and I need a new major. I was pursuing Computer Engineering, but programming and I do not get along very well (Once you go past “if” statements I’m Lost). So my first question is, what majors are good for entering the game industry, that don’t involve programming. My next question is about finding an entry-level position that I can learn on the job. I used your job search tool that you provided and most jobs seemed to require previous experience, any suggestions there?
T. Thomas is a General Manager for a top Game Industry Game Developer saying “We like to hire the best people for our QA Team. This means we will hire some that proves to have skills in testing video games. When we look at all the employment applications for Game Testing, those who have qualified skills are the ones who will get hired. We were curious about http://get-paid-to-play-games.milehightopsites.com learning from a pro game tester. Proven technical learning skills are proven here to learn about game testing. This is not endorsement of the website. However, it speaks volumes about game testing! We feel anyone who get these skills will be game testing video games.“
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Video game or product testers may also be known as quality control inspectors. These professionals verify that products meet certain standards, and testers try out products to determine if there are any flaws. For example, video game testers play games specifically to look for problems, such as program glitches, broken applications or non-functioning visual effects.
We are posting this on the Design Notes first because we ALWAYS want to get people from our community. You all know the game as well (and sometimes better O_O) than we do, so it makes sense to bring new help onto the team from our player community! Real life has stolen some of our testers away over the last few months, (shakes fist at real life), so it's time to buff our team count!

Are you passionate about gaming? Do you have excellent programming skills? Do you like being creative and working with the best developers, artists, and game designers from the industry? Do you enjoy solving technical challenges in mobile gaming and bringing mobile games to the next level? Then read on because you might just be the developer we're looking for.
Consider voluntary professional certification. Organizations like the American Society for Quality (ASQ) offer certification related to this field. You may also consider earning certification in more technical areas, such as a programming language. If you have programmer training you can become certified by passing written exams, although some exams may include practical skills tests as well as written questions. You also must maintain your certifications in accordance with the organization's guidelines.
ARE YOU THE ONE? We are looking for elites to expand our dynamic team! If you are confident, outspoken and energetic, you are the one! Benefits - Insane Salary! Earn up to $4000 monthly with basic and commission! - On-the-job training on our proven methodologies! - Flexible working hours - You can start work anytime as long as the weekly hours are met! Jobscope - Conduct fun outdoor roa ...
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