Hello , Im a 15 year old teen that would like to get into the game testing industry. I have good teamwork and also leadership communication skills. The consoles that I have are an Ipod 4th gen. Xbox 360, and an apple computer. I play about 9 hours a day on the weekdays and 19 on weekends. Though I would prefer an at home job cause I am currently in highschool. I would really like some feedback or maybe some job opportunities thanks also I am very good at locating glitches and will provide a very detailed report on every one I find. Please email me at jcastorillo@gmail.com .

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There don’t seem to be very many entry level Quality Assurance Tester job available. The few i’ve seen want at least 6 months experience and previous knowledge. Both of which I lack. I’m disabled and have no choice but to work from home. All the job postings i’ve seen are on site only. Oh well, that’s how every entry level job i’ve tried to look into ends up: a dead end of on site jobs. I guess i’ll just try applying for SSI again.
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Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?
Hi-Rez Studios is hiring a Lead QA Analyst to work at our studio in Alpharetta, Georgia. At Hi-Rez, you will have an opportunity to be part of an innovative environment that embraces new and different ideas. We are a passionate and enthusiastic bunch who love video games. We have incredibly talented individuals who are empowered to create, and challenged to learn. All of this means more opportunities for you to unleash your ingenuity, energy, collaboration, and dedication. Come join the creator of the critically acclaimed SMITE, Paladins, and Global Agenda as we embark on exciting new online game projects.
Hi Tyffani, you seem very passionate about games, that’s awesome! There are lots of different careers, so you need to figure out which one(s) might “click” with your interests and talents. You could start by finding out whether you are more attracted to art, or to programming, or design. Check out the Quest for Your Career articles to learn more about each one – once you find something that sounds interesting, then you can start thinking about how to pursue it. Have fun!
The job outlook for testers is directly tied to the video game industry. As long as people are lining up to buy the latest versions of Fallout, Madden, Call of Duty, or the hottest labels, there will be a need for testers to “break” these games. While it is unknown just how many video game testers there are in the US, the number is certainly in the thousands.

The lead programmer manages the software engineering of a game, developing the technical specification and then delegating different elements. They usually compile technical documentation and ensure the quality, effectiveness and appropriateness of all the game code. They also manage the production of the different ‘builds’ of a game, ensuring that coding bugs are fixed, and making sure everything happens on schedule. The lead programmer must also provide support and guidance to the programming team, which can include specialism in games engine programming, graphics programming, gamesplay, physics, artificial intelligence (AI), tools development, networking and build engineering.
Be aware that there are scam websites that will try to get you to pay for your own equipment in order to get a job testing games. Do not work with those companies! All legitimate testing companies will provide you with everything you need, because they’re legally required to do so. Also, you should never have to pay money in order to find and apply for testing jobs. If a website asks you for money to help you find a testing job, stay away!

If you are working in or looking for gaming jobs and are ready for your next career move, Games-Career.com is the platform for you. The same applies to students and new talents with an interest in computer and video games who want to break into the games industry or gain professional experience in game development, production and marketing. On Games-Career.com there are game job offers for nearly every degree of experience: If what you are looking for a full- or part-time position, a junior or senior position, for an internship, traineeship or placement as a working student in the games industry, you’ve got a good chance to find the right match on Games-Career.com.


Testers don’t normally need to travel very often, but it depends on what kind of company you’re working for. If you end up being a tester on a project that’s developed in a different town than where you’re testing it – for example if you’re working for a publisher in San Francisco but the developer is in Seattle – then you might need to travel occasionally. If you can’t travel for some reason, it’s probably not a deal-breaker for most testing companies.
The hardest part of this job is that most video game testers don’t get to pick the game they are testing. If you are a diehard Guitar Hero fan, it may be challenging to test for controller problems in the newest Hannah Montana game. Every tester must remember that video game testing is a job and even after long hours and sore eyes, you are still getting paid to play video games. And sometimes you live the dream, when you are paid for “testing” Mario Kart or beating Ninja Gaiden.
Nearly any game studio needs testers, and some of the big companies like Nintendo, EA, and Microsoft employ hundreds of game testers either directly or through temp agencies. Like any job, you can start by searching for job postings near your city using the video game job search tool. You can also search on popular tech-industry job sites like Monster.com, or on job aggregator sites like Indeed.com.
Make sure to keep up-to-date on video game trends. For example, by reading industry magazines or blogs, you can find out when new games will be released and which games are preferred by certain demographics. Trade magazines and blog sites may also offer insider information about game developer companies, which may prove to be useful knowledge when you try to find open video game tester positions.
Though the industry doesn't pay well for entry-level positions, what about more seasoned QA testers? Danny says, "I work with a guy who has spent the last eight years keeping his nose clean, never in fights with leadership, does whatever is asked of him, and is a freaking QA Ninja when it comes to PC testing. After eight years, he is still paid $14 an hour. I just think we're worth a whole heck of a lot more than $10 an hour." He believes that game developers/publishers should "offer some benefits like they do the rest of the company".

Hi Jackie, it’s interesting that you mention an interest in translation. Do you mean that you’re bilingual or multilingual? If so, you should investigate jobs as at companies that do “localization testing” because they employ translators and also testers. One company I’ve worked with before is Babel Media, so that could be a good place to start your search.
This is one reason why it’s best to try and get a full-time employment (“FTE”) testing job at an established game company. Most regions require that employers provide medical benefits to their full-time employees, so it’s often a safer way to go. If you can’t find and FTE job initially, you may want to consider working as a temp at first, just to learn the job and get some experience on your resume.
Hi, my name is Danny, from Houston,Texas. I’m 16 on my sophomore year. I’ve been playing games since in my early childhood years. I currently have a ps3, ps4, and Touchscreen all in one computer (not good for gaming though). After graduating high school, I’m not really sure how to start being a video game tester. I have no skill, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn. Any tips to help me out?
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Hi Satadala, I think you have enough experience to get a job as a game tester. So it’s hard to know why you have not been hired yet, you may just need to be persistent and keep applying. You should also try applying for smaller game studios, as EA/Ubisoft/Etc. likely receive hundreds of applications each week. You may have better luck with a smaller studio to start out.

For example, a large multiplayer online game might have 10,000 different areas that players can explore over several years of play. It would be impossible to test all of those areas manually, every time a new build of the game is created. So instead of doing it manually, an SDET might write a test program that quickly moves the player character to each one of the 10,000 areas for a few seconds each. That’s way faster than a human tester could ever do it manually.

CPU: Intel Core i3-3210 3.2 GHz / AMD A8-7600 APU 3.1 GHz or equivalentRAM: 4 GBOS: Windows 7 and upVIDEO CARD: Integrated: Intel HD Graphics 4000 (Ivy Bridge) or AMD Radeon R5 series (Kaveri line) with OpenGL 4.41Discrete: Nvidia GeForce 400 Series or AMD Radeon HD 7000 series with OpenGL 4.4FREE DISK SPACE: At least 1 GB for Game Core and Other Files

If you are searching for a career that lets you work from your own home, then look to the video game industry. While some game testers will work in-house for major companies, work from home is a very common practice. This means that many testers have no daily schedule and no boss hovering over their work. However, once an assignment is given, you are expected to meet specific deadlines. How you meet those deadlines is entirely up to you. Often the game developer will set individual milestones, breaking down the work into smaller segments.
I’ve always been interested in working at home doing something I enjoy ever sense I left the service. QA testing has always been a interest because of the detailed work and the ability to work on your own but with a common goal with thousands of others. The issue I’m having currently is that I’ve grown up casually gaming across all platforms and genres and I just don’t have the slightest idea on who I should talk to or where to send a resume. Any help would be extremely apreciated.

ItemForge MMO Shop is looking for levelers and boosters. I will explain and provide everything you need to get started (guide, info, accounts) but it is up to you to learn basics (game mechanics). The more games you learn, the more jobs you will be eligible to get so I suggest learning minimum two. You should know at least one of them quite well already, otherwise you will need to learn it, which is unpaid during the first 6 months of cooperation. Longterm you are expected to improve your skills and knowledge in your free time (staying up to date with patches), but we will pay for your training when a new game is added to the shop. If you prove to be efficient and reliable, it will become a full time job. Duration: - It is a LONG-TERM project. (Note: Don't bother if expect to work 1 day/1 week/1 month) - It is a 5+ days a week job Requirements: - Long term (this job is for years - the game may change, but the players remain the same!) - Responsible & reliable - Ability to read (games change all the time, you need to stay up to date) - STABLE internet + PC able to handle the newest MMO games Offer below is for basic services (require only minimal game knowledge and average skills). If you are a very skilled gamer and can supply premium (top rating) boosts without my help (know-how and accounts) then please send me a list + price of services you can provide (any game, not just the ones we support right now). Always looking for: BOOSTER ($16-24 / day - about $450 a month) for boosting/multiboxing, who is online a lot (minimum 8h+ almost every day) to use 3rd party programs like Multiboxer, you should be tech savy (good at troubleshooting software etc.) You will be doing on demand live boosting (when customer is playing) or perform multibox leveling (which has a flexible schedule). You should have above average skills, good enough game knowledge and at least communicative English. POWER LEVELER ($8-12 / Day - about $250 a month) who can stream for menial jobs like leveling or grinding but also skilled quick jobs (typically x hours). You need a conversational English, above average skills/knowledge and should be online almost every day. You can outsource this job to your non-English speaking friends and earn on being a middle man but you still need a manager who will train them and coordinate the jobs. We also cooperate with teams (e.g. in gaming centers) who can provide many players and/or 24/7 leveling on the same PC (streaming isn't required if gamers are supervised). Power Leveling is all about manually playing online games on customer's account and achieving specific goals within set deadline. Playing manually means 100% by hand, you are not allowed (without my explicit case by case permission) to use or install anything beside the official game client. VPN Tunnel will be provided for you, you can't power level without it. Although many jobs allow you to have a flexible schedule, high availability is desired because sometimes you will have to be able to play during scheduled events like in the party, during specific fixed daily schedule. Only minimal game mechanics knowledge is required to start receiving jobs (100-200h /played). All jobs require you to be online but amount of attention needed varies from job to job, some only require you to play 10% of the time (leecher), others 100% (grind). Rate is calculated for average skill level (not a clicker or a keyboard turner). If you are very efficient and creative, you can complete some (but not all) of the jobs a few times faster or do 2-3 jobs at the same time. This means double or even triple hourly rate but it is very random so you need to be ok with the basic rate, even during jobs that take weeks to complete. Other than that, there is no advancement opportunity, your base rate will never increase (though you may still advance to a Booster). You are expected to play 8h a day, almost every day after you take the job (until you complete it). You will be paid a fixed price for average delivery time (deadlines are very fair), whenever you complete it in 50% or 150% of the time, you will still be paid the same amount (this way efficiency is encouraged). Need all of the following information in your offer (failing to provide a clear answer to any of them will most likely cause your application to be auto-declined): 1. Which position are you applying for, why that one? What kind of tasks do you think you will do? 2. Daily/Weekly availability (how many hours?) 3. Can you play without ping issues on servers located in Europe and America? (try D3 trial and make some levels on BOTH game modes) 4. Preferred long-term daily price (don't waste time asking for more than is offered) 5. PC/Internet specifications (can you stream?) 6. MMO accomplishments and/or gaming experience (only list impressive things that take thousands of hours) 7. Experience in online gaming services industry 8. English level 9. Cover letter (sell yourself!)
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