Hi Carlos, in your question, you mention several different game jobs: writer, programmer, tester, design, and art. So the first thing I’d recommend is to get some clarity on which game job you want to do. If you can identify what it is you want to do, then the path will be clearer. If you’re currently going for a degree in writing or programming, then try to do some game-related projects while you’re in school, to start building your portfolio. Then you’ll be able to apply for jobs directly after college.
Hey Jason, I have read so much on become a QA tester and have a few questions. First I’m going to start off by saying I am a successful BDA for All State insurance, I am 27 years old, and I have 3 diploma’s all in the business field. You might be wondering why I would be interested in pursuing a video game testing job as I do have a successful career already but to be honest gaming is the thing I love the most and I’ve never had that feeling of waking up and being excited to go to work, I kind of just do it cause the money is good and its what I’ve got at the moment so I roll with it. I now understand that you need to do a job you love over a job that pays well because its the thing you do most of the time! and lets be honest, I don’t get excited everyday about selling insurance or handling someone’s claim. I have been a hardcore gamer since I was 5 years old, all started with a Sega genesis. Ive played competitive in league of legends, heroes of the storm, overwatch, cs:go, wow arena (when it was big), I’ve literally played all these gamers with the best of the best and at one point was sponsored by 2 different companies to pursue a competitive scene in overwatch and league of legends. So my gaming experience and skills at games are well above average, as well as my knowledge for games themselves (I’ve played so many!) My question to you is do you think it is possible for someone being 27 years old to get into the gaming career? Am I limited by my age? And I also live in Canada (close to Toronto) and I feel Canada may not have the best gaming studio’s, if any near me at all….. Now I tried reading a few things from your book and tried using your “search for studio’s near you” engine but I don’t think its geared for Canadians. What steps do you think I should take to pursue this dream I have to become a game tester or even just work with a gaming company through marketing or design, writing (I have a very smart mind and I feel I can create a very good gaming story line, Ive created 2 previous games with my friends and the story line was killer! Story was all me!) etc.
Hi Daniel, a job testing games is like any other job: the company will post a job opening online, and then you can apply for it. You’ll want to do some research to learn as much as you can about game/software testing to help you get jobs easier, you can find lots of information here on this website or you can get a copy of my book on game testing if you’re interested.
Location: SomersetWorking hours: Mon - Fri (9am - 6pm)[Negotiable]Duration: 2-3 monthsSalary: $8/hrResponsibilities:- Identify, isolate, and document bugs clearly and concisely in a bug database- Run test suites, verify fixes, spot grammar and language mistakes in specified language - Follow the documented processes at all stages of the testing process- Verify that bugs have been fixed and impleme ...
ItemForge MMO Shop is looking for levelers and boosters. I will explain and provide everything you need to get started (guide, info, accounts) but it is up to you to learn basics (game mechanics). The more games you learn, the more jobs you will be eligible to get so I suggest learning minimum two. You should know at least one of them quite well already, otherwise you will need to learn it, which is unpaid during the first 6 months of cooperation. Longterm you are expected to improve your skills and knowledge in your free time (staying up to date with patches), but we will pay for your training when a new game is added to the shop. If you prove to be efficient and reliable, it will become a full time job. Duration: - It is a LONG-TERM project. (Note: Don't bother if expect to work 1 day/1 week/1 month) - It is a 5+ days a week job Requirements: - Long term (this job is for years - the game may change, but the players remain the same!) - Responsible & reliable - Ability to read (games change all the time, you need to stay up to date) - STABLE internet + PC able to handle the newest MMO games Offer below is for basic services (require only minimal game knowledge and average skills). If you are a very skilled gamer and can supply premium (top rating) boosts without my help (know-how and accounts) then please send me a list + price of services you can provide (any game, not just the ones we support right now). Always looking for: BOOSTER ($16-24 / day - about $450 a month) for boosting/multiboxing, who is online a lot (minimum 8h+ almost every day) to use 3rd party programs like Multiboxer, you should be tech savy (good at troubleshooting software etc.) You will be doing on demand live boosting (when customer is playing) or perform multibox leveling (which has a flexible schedule). You should have above average skills, good enough game knowledge and at least communicative English. POWER LEVELER ($8-12 / Day - about $250 a month) who can stream for menial jobs like leveling or grinding but also skilled quick jobs (typically x hours). You need a conversational English, above average skills/knowledge and should be online almost every day. You can outsource this job to your non-English speaking friends and earn on being a middle man but you still need a manager who will train them and coordinate the jobs. We also cooperate with teams (e.g. in gaming centers) who can provide many players and/or 24/7 leveling on the same PC (streaming isn't required if gamers are supervised). Power Leveling is all about manually playing online games on customer's account and achieving specific goals within set deadline. Playing manually means 100% by hand, you are not allowed (without my explicit case by case permission) to use or install anything beside the official game client. VPN Tunnel will be provided for you, you can't power level without it. Although many jobs allow you to have a flexible schedule, high availability is desired because sometimes you will have to be able to play during scheduled events like in the party, during specific fixed daily schedule. Only minimal game mechanics knowledge is required to start receiving jobs (100-200h /played). All jobs require you to be online but amount of attention needed varies from job to job, some only require you to play 10% of the time (leecher), others 100% (grind). Rate is calculated for average skill level (not a clicker or a keyboard turner). If you are very efficient and creative, you can complete some (but not all) of the jobs a few times faster or do 2-3 jobs at the same time. This means double or even triple hourly rate but it is very random so you need to be ok with the basic rate, even during jobs that take weeks to complete. Other than that, there is no advancement opportunity, your base rate will never increase (though you may still advance to a Booster). You are expected to play 8h a day, almost every day after you take the job (until you complete it). You will be paid a fixed price for average delivery time (deadlines are very fair), whenever you complete it in 50% or 150% of the time, you will still be paid the same amount (this way efficiency is encouraged). Need all of the following information in your offer (failing to provide a clear answer to any of them will most likely cause your application to be auto-declined): 1. Which position are you applying for, why that one? What kind of tasks do you think you will do? 2. Daily/Weekly availability (how many hours?) 3. Can you play without ping issues on servers located in Europe and America? (try D3 trial and make some levels on BOTH game modes) 4. Preferred long-term daily price (don't waste time asking for more than is offered) 5. PC/Internet specifications (can you stream?) 6. MMO accomplishments and/or gaming experience (only list impressive things that take thousands of hours) 7. Experience in online gaming services industry 8. English level 9. Cover letter (sell yourself!)
The job outlook for testers is directly tied to the video game industry. As long as people are lining up to buy the latest versions of Fallout, Madden, Call of Duty, or the hottest labels, there will be a need for testers to “break” these games. While it is unknown just how many video game testers there are in the US, the number is certainly in the thousands.

Valve and Ubisoft may have internal testing teams, but most game studios do not keep a large number of testers on the payroll – instead, they hire outside game testing companies. I don’t know which contract firms they use, but Babble used to be a big one, and UTest/Applause is popular right now. You could start by looking at one of those companies.
QA testers sign non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) with their employers and can be fired or even sued for divulging information. All the testers we contacted spoke to us on condition of anonymity. We have given them pseudonyms to protect their identities. We have checked each of their credentials. We asked for comments from a variety of games publishers, but have received zero responses.
Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?
To get hired as a game tester, there are several skills you’ll need to learn: how to find and reproduce (“repro”) bugs, how to write bug reports, and how to verify that the game development team has fixed them. There are also “soft skills” you’ll need to learn such as being a good communicator, detail-oriented, and self-motivated. You can learn all of this and more by reading my book, Land a Job as a Video Game Tester. You’ll learn the basics of game testing, and all the steps to apply, interview, and accept job offers. It’s got everything you need to know to get a job testing games. read it
Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?
Game testers ensure the quality and condition of video and mobile games for game production companies. Game testers also test hardware, such as gaming consoles and controllers to ensure quality, durability, and functionality. A core responsibility of a game tester is to identify bugs, glitches, and problems that potentially inhibit game operation and obstruct user experience. Also, game testers collaborate with visual designers and programmers to remedy the problems they find in games.
As more technology becomes available to video game developers, the consumer market will expand to offer a wider range of products, thus creating jobs for all you hardcore gamers out there. After all, VR is only just getting started and there’s already over 1,100 VR supported games on Steam! Here’s a list of five video game jobs gamers might find interesting:
hey, im 14 on the verge of being 15 and i extremly want a game testing job. ive been sending emails out to gaming sites and all i get back are links that give me no info or answers and no contact numbers. id realy appreciate it if i could get some help out with trying to get a job or contact anything realy that would help would be most appreciated thanks (email is jourdan.turner@gmail.com)
Hey. I’ve been gaming most of my life and am meeting my ends as a teenager. im 17 almost 18 and am a senior in high school. For my English 4 class im required to ask a few questions that hopefully you can answer? I Love most games, and I always replay levels on games over and over, simply to see if I can do weird things anyways, so I thought maybe starting as a beta tester and working towards a game designer would be really nice. Id rather work from home though, as im limited on transport. any suggestions?

Video game or product testers may also be known as quality control inspectors. These professionals verify that products meet certain standards, and testers try out products to determine if there are any flaws. For example, video game testers play games specifically to look for problems, such as program glitches, broken applications or non-functioning visual effects.


If being laid off isn't bad enough, finding continued employment is also difficult. "Everyone tries to advance to positions that aren't available and won't get," says Phil. While this may also be true for other careers within the games industry, he believes this problem is compounded because testers are often hired through a staffing company and not internally. Many publishers won't offer a reference because of contractor policies. Most testers are not, technically, employees.
Few people understand that not all jobs are highly technical. Video and computer games companies are in dire need of programmers, engineers, animators, and other “technically inclined” people – but they also need administrators, marketing and sales staff, recruiters, and more. Find all kinds of jobs from the top employers in the JobMonkey Job Center.

Hi Evan, thanks for the questions. First of all, playtesting isn’t a full-time job, you might be thinking about the QA Tester job that’s described in this article. That is a full-time job, and most companies do not require a degree to do that job. Also, there are dozens (hundreds?) of game studios in the US, so I recommend you don’t limit yourself as to which one you’d work for when you first start out — you’ll have a lot to learn, and you can learn at most any game company.


The perfect job! Drink while working or work while drinking! I need you to playtest a drinking party game (dare type, barnyard themed) while checking various aspects of the game: - which cards aren't working/fun. what changes could be made to them (rewording, rating and etc) - is there a way to balance the game better - is the game even fun? - what's the weakest part of the game? - how did the theme and characters fit this type of game? Requirements: - Testing will need to be conducted 3-4 times in 1 week. - Before testing we'll come up with a simple questionnaire that you'll ask your friends (did you like the game? would you buy it? what did you like most/least about it? would you play it again?). - You will need to print out the game (we'll send you the pdfs of cards) - During the test you will need to gather other info to report on (comments on content, reactions to content, playing time and etc). Comments on content can be written in the doc I'll send you, the rest we can just discuss over skype. - You'll propose changes and correction according to that report. :) If we work well together, I'll ask you to continue playtesting the game and even get involved in other game projects later. :) I would rather pay per playtest. So if you know that you are able to test an x amount of times, send me your offer. less more
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