Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: German (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia
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The external producer advises the developer and ensures the publisher has the information to make the game commercially successful. This involves coordinating the release of screenshots and demo disks with marketing, handling outsourcing with the internal producer and running focus tests. They are also the developer’s go-between with the publisher in terms of milestone payments or any major changes.
Hi Ruben, it sounds like you’ve already started developing some of the skills you need to get a job testing – namely, learning about games, and learning how to find and report bugs. You do NOT have to pay anybody to get a job testing games – game testing is like any other job, you just need to find the jobs (start your search here), apply, and interview. If anybody tries to make you pay to find testing jobs, it’s probably a scam and should be avoided.
Hi Darren, I do not think it’s too late for you to start transitioning careers, there are plenty of examples of people chaining to the game industry as a second career. I have some specific advice on an episode of the podcast about how to transition to a new career in games, so check that out for sure. You also might like 10 proven ways to break into the game industry. I wish you luck!

I’ve been playing video games since the original launch of the Xbox 360 console. I’m 17 and I am very eager to go into this field of work. I’ve found countless bugs through my years of gaming and I always try to help people on the community forums for that game! Knowing that people get paid for doing this, I thought I might give it a go and get paid for doing something I love! I know there are hundreds of comments and you hear stories like this all the time. To tell you the truth, I’ve never been good at perusing things that I wanted to do. I spend hours and hours of research and I can never find the right information I need. I never have the proper guidance. I loved this forum. It helped so much and actually gave me hope that I can do the thing I love to do the most one day as a career. I really don’t know where to look for a job in this field at. I live in a small city, the only work here is just small restaurants and other small companies. I wonder, should I move to a different city and pursue my dream? Is there anyway I could work for a company from home? Could I test games and spend the hours and hours of researching and locating bugs from the comfort of my room? Please give me guidance.

Many video gamers are also creatives – making this position all the more attractive to gamers. A Multimedia Artist is responsible for dreaming, designing, visualizing and creating graphics and animation for video games and other multimedia. This person is responsible for bringing the writers’ dreams to life on a screen, so you could say the job is pretty important.
Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?
Looking for a PC gamer to help me set up the ultimate gaming PC for my son. I own a medical software company but none of my developers are into gaming. I I want to customize the PC in a number of ways to make it fun and easy to use for my son. He is only 7 and this is his first gaming PC so I need some help installing games, creating shortcuts, installing the GTAV patch that removes violence, etc. I also want recommendation on good games for a kid his age. I also want assistance control some of the content on the computer to limit access to some content on Youtube and the web in general. I will provide you access to the PC via TeamViewer and you will be able to customize remotely.
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