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You can take pride in working for the employer of choice in the communities where we do business. You'll participate in a culture that treats all employees with respect, encourages their growth and development, and rewards excellence. Your thoughts and ideas are welcome here. We want to hear every fresh approach and new experience. If you find that appealing, then IGT could be the place for you.  We look forward to meeting you!
Hi Robert, you’re right that there’s a lot to learn to be in the video game industry – but that’s the same with any industry. The sooner you start learning, the sooner you’ll get good at it. 🙂 A college degree isn’t required, but a degree or at least a certificate would help a lot when you’re applying for jobs. If you don’t know where to start, then I’d suggest maybe taking a game-related certificate from a local college if possible – it will teach you the basics, and help you start making a portfolio. Best of luck!
Ok, I am 20 years old. I have been playing games before I could walk. (Literally, I was sitting on my dads lap clicking around and “playing” the best I could as a toddler, Starcraft lol) No one on my family is as passionate about gaming as I am. Its no addiction or unhealthy because I control my weight, take care of my eyes/lighting, and take breaks. I immerse myself into the game. Replying games in different ways, especially free roam/open world games, and role play even. I was told once, “There is a whole world out there man, stop sitting in there playing games” to which I replied that “I have seen more worlds and lived more lives in my games that you may never experiance.” I am always promoting games I enjoy and recommed them. I convince people to at least trt demos/trials or view videos at least to see. I get excited for new games, and saddened when I beat title/franchise I put years into. (Mass Effect is one) My question/comment whatever you may see this as, is this. I do not hardly know anything about computers. Coding and modding is beyond my skills. However I do tell people what ideas I would like to see implemented, what bugs there is at times, I can play a whole day away besides eating,sleeping, etc if time permits, and I have ideas of worlds, languages, characters, and more all in my head. That I thought up. Some may be based off of races/worlds/names of other things but never exact. But I am terrible at art. I can not draw. I have all these ideas and said if I could put them on paper or on a computer I could be rich and bring whole new life to games. I am scared to shoot for a testing job and work in college only to fail out use lack of computing skills and art skills. I have a vivid immagination. I can look around my home state and turn it futuristic ot post apocolyptic or alien without even closing my eyes. No exaggeration. Advice? Wisdom? Anything. I have often thought (sadly I might add) of getting rid of games and “growing up” like everyone tells me to, but I want to give back o other games and become a designer or dev even someday. But afraid to mess up. Should I go with a normal mundane job, or risk it? Help me out peeps, ima gamer, ima nerd, a trekkie/trekker, harry potter lover, lord of the rings follower, star wars fanboy. In essence, im your peer xD advice?
Hey Jason, I have read so much on become a QA tester and have a few questions. First I’m going to start off by saying I am a successful BDA for All State insurance, I am 27 years old, and I have 3 diploma’s all in the business field. You might be wondering why I would be interested in pursuing a video game testing job as I do have a successful career already but to be honest gaming is the thing I love the most and I’ve never had that feeling of waking up and being excited to go to work, I kind of just do it cause the money is good and its what I’ve got at the moment so I roll with it. I now understand that you need to do a job you love over a job that pays well because its the thing you do most of the time! and lets be honest, I don’t get excited everyday about selling insurance or handling someone’s claim. I have been a hardcore gamer since I was 5 years old, all started with a Sega genesis. Ive played competitive in league of legends, heroes of the storm, overwatch, cs:go, wow arena (when it was big), I’ve literally played all these gamers with the best of the best and at one point was sponsored by 2 different companies to pursue a competitive scene in overwatch and league of legends. So my gaming experience and skills at games are well above average, as well as my knowledge for games themselves (I’ve played so many!) My question to you is do you think it is possible for someone being 27 years old to get into the gaming career? Am I limited by my age? And I also live in Canada (close to Toronto) and I feel Canada may not have the best gaming studio’s, if any near me at all….. Now I tried reading a few things from your book and tried using your “search for studio’s near you” engine but I don’t think its geared for Canadians. What steps do you think I should take to pursue this dream I have to become a game tester or even just work with a gaming company through marketing or design, writing (I have a very smart mind and I feel I can create a very good gaming story line, Ive created 2 previous games with my friends and the story line was killer! Story was all me!) etc.
I’m afraid I can’t help with financial advice. But as far as your game design goals, I think it will be hard to start a career in games in Alaska, because there aren’t any game studios up there that I know of. The closest US city with a strong game industry would be Seattle, so one strategy might be to move to Seattle and get a non-game job while you pursue a video game design certificate or degree. But you’d want to be sure that your health and finances are in order before making such a move. Be smart about it.
Before you change your major, I think you should try taking an online programming class to see if you like programming. (CodeSchool has some great classes, and they’re inexpensive – maybe try their JavaScript classes.) If you find out that programming is interesting for you once you spend a few hours learning it, then you might consider changing your major.
IGT is committed to the principles of Equal Employment Opportunity and to providing reasonable accommodations to applicants with physical and/or mental disabilities. If you're interested in applying for a position at IGT and are in need of accommodation or special assistance to navigate our website or to complete your application, please send an email to careers@igt.com. Requests for reasonable accommodation will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
Hi Tyffani, you seem very passionate about games, that’s awesome! There are lots of different careers, so you need to figure out which one(s) might “click” with your interests and talents. You could start by finding out whether you are more attracted to art, or to programming, or design. Check out the Quest for Your Career articles to learn more about each one – once you find something that sounds interesting, then you can start thinking about how to pursue it. Have fun!
Hi. I am a 17 year old student from new zealand in my final year of high school. I have been playing video games since Crash Bandicoot came out on the Playstation 1 system, and back then I could find many bugs and errors with the game. I am looking for a job as a Video Game Tester, and I enjoy challenging environments, as well as repeating things in games over and over again, this coming from my Prince of Persia puzzle history with the original game. Is there any branches for large companies such as Bioware, Bethesda Game Studios or EA in new zealand? or will I have to search outside of the country?
Thanks you for your articles ,they helped me choose my career . I am truly indebted to you .So I wanna become a programmer and I think that I will start my career as a QA tester.im currently 16 and have played quite a few games .So can I start testing games online and what do I have to do for the basics . Also can you suggest me some programming languages essential for my game development career which I can learn right now . And which country ( particularly city ) would be best to go for my career , cause I was thinking of going to USA .Thanks
Learn how to become a game tester with my book, Land a Job as a Video Game Tester. You’ll learn the basics of game testing, and all the steps to apply, interview, and accept job offers. I worked hard to write a book that provides everything you need to know to get a job testing games, but if I missed anything then you should email me and I’ll answer any remaining questions you may have. read it
If being laid off isn't bad enough, finding continued employment is also difficult. "Everyone tries to advance to positions that aren't available and won't get," says Phil. While this may also be true for other careers within the games industry, he believes this problem is compounded because testers are often hired through a staffing company and not internally. Many publishers won't offer a reference because of contractor policies. Most testers are not, technically, employees.

At OnlineGameTester we help gamers to become game testers, QA and beta tester in a insanely growing industry. We have a small dedicated team, who developed a platform for gamers and game developers. We have created e-books, video guides, tutorials and much more, to help gamers get started, and teach you everything you need to know about game testing, reporting, recording etc.


Hi Jacob, your first stop when looking for game studios in a given location should be GameDevMap.com. It’s a crowd-sourced list of studios. I can see that there are over a dozen developers and publishers there, but I don’t see any of the “giant” companies you mentioned – but that’s okay, because you don’t need to target the big, famous developers for your first job. Start wherever you can, build your experience, and then you can move elsewhere later on. Good luck!

Thank you so much for all of your answers to those questions, it has really helped me. I want to eventually work my way up to either being a programmer at valve or ubisoft. But I want to start off my video game career as a game tester. But just a quick question, what would it take to be a game tester for a company like ubisoft or valve because it would make it much easier working my way up on the job ladder for a company that I want to work for. And if they are only looking for experienced testers to work for them what do you recommend as a good company to test games for that would accept new testers?
In games you play, look for glitches and errors. When you find them, document them thoroughly – when it happens, how it affect play, and if you can, list possible fixes for the problem. Then report these issues to the company that publishes the game. Your correspondence over this issue could help give you a contact person in that studio. And this could get your foot in the door of that company.
The job outlook for testers is directly tied to the video game industry. As long as people are lining up to buy the latest versions of Fallout, Madden, Call of Duty, or the hottest labels, there will be a need for testers to “break” these games. While it is unknown just how many video game testers there are in the US, the number is certainly in the thousands.

Hi Roman – if you’re old enough to get a job, you have a lot of experience playing games, and you have a good work ethic? Then yes, you might have a good shot at getting a job as a game tester. You may not be able to get a job at the specific company right away, any testing job will help you get started. But it doesn’t hurt to try – why not apply for the job?

Hi Satadala, I think you have enough experience to get a job as a game tester. So it’s hard to know why you have not been hired yet, you may just need to be persistent and keep applying. You should also try applying for smaller game studios, as EA/Ubisoft/Etc. likely receive hundreds of applications each week. You may have better luck with a smaller studio to start out.


“I used to think I was super lucky, but then I realized that those hours I spent every week on the gaming club at Emerson watching eSports, following League of Legends and playing video games were all a part of it,” she says. “Many people might not think of that as professional experience, but it’s the same thing as a film major who watches a lot of movies.”

When you’re looking at job postings, keep in mind that many employers will still consider candidates even if they only have around 80% of the qualifications. Watch carefully for postings that say things like “2 years experience required, or equivalent experience” because often times college or independent game development is good enough to get an interview.
P.S. The only way you can find out how great all of this can be is to get started today. We promise you a 100% Money Back Guarantee within 60 days! That's how confident we are of this AMAZING system. You can be signing up for your very first video game tester job within minutes, even if you're all the way in India, Australia, or even Singapore! That's the beauty about the Internet, it's a 24hr, World-Wide GOLDMINE! You can work when you want and how you want!
Or, to put it in other terms, rather than sitting around playing games all day, you'll be sitting around playing the same part of a game over and over. And not the climactic boss fight, either – at least, not necessarily. You're just as likely to be assigned to make sure that the different sections of the pause menu work in all different areas of the game.
Hi Nima, there aren’t really any jobs as “work from home” or online game testers. You should apply for normal, on-site testing jobs in your country. If there aren’t any game studios or game testing companies near you, then consider working for a non-game software company as a tester, because you may still get useful experience in software development.
Video games are a major part of the UK’s screen entertainment industry. Games are everywhere, from phones, tablets, PCs, consoles and virtual reality headsets (VR). This exciting industry blends creative talents, from artists to technicians. Game development can be a highly complex process often lasting up to two years and requiring teams of programmers, designers, artists, writers, musicians, and even actors. Whether supported by multi-million-pound investment for a flagship console game, or a micro team working from home on a mobile game, developers can achieve great success. The computer games market is highly competitive and subject to seasonal peaks, and launch dates that need to be met.

Hey! My name is Gloria and I'm 16. I am not exactly interested in video game beta testing. I'm more interested in like IMVU or Second life; Virtual worlds and such. I'm also interested in different types of software like music production, videography, photography and graphic design as well as art studio software and ect. I was wondering if you guys could help. I have been looking everywhere!


Take the ISTQB exam only through ASTQB. You can register to take the exam through a test center (they are located throughout the U.S. and in almost every country in the world). Be sure it is the ISTQB exam from ASTQB because employers check our official American list of ISTQB certified testers here on this site or by calling our office to confirm you are really certified!
hi im very curious about becomeing a Video Game tester and I’ve been playing video games since I was a child and really want to get into this industry. I live in Canada but I don’t know what area’s around here might employ me so i really wanna know just how i can become a Game tester in Canada and im in to Role playing Games like Dark Soul’s and Skyrim games like that so is there any advice you can offer me

When companies post their jobs, the requirements are usually flexible – what they list is actually what they want “in a perfect world.” So if you find jobs that only require 1 or 2 years of experience, you should apply for the job and you might get an interview. But you should learn as much as you can about game testing before the interview, so that you don’t sound like a complete n00b – learn as much about testing as you can so you can speak about it intelligently during the interview.
Game testers ensure the quality and condition of video and mobile games for game production companies. Game testers also test hardware, such as gaming consoles and controllers to ensure quality, durability, and functionality. A core responsibility of a game tester is to identify bugs, glitches, and problems that potentially inhibit game operation and obstruct user experience. Also, game testers collaborate with visual designers and programmers to remedy the problems they find in games.
I'm 19 year old female and love to play video games. I've been playing for about... maybe 10 years? I don't really remember... but I've been thinking of getting a job as a beta tester, but with no luck... I used to have the ps2 and wii, but we had to get rid of them and I currently have the 3ds and still play it... too much I might add. Do I have any chance at all on becoming one?
I enjoyed my time at Multiplay. A typical day included helping a large number of customers through ticket and live chat interfaces with issues surrounding the operation of their game servers. I learned some new techniques regarding the rapid deployment of game updates to a large number of servers (often 20-30, or more, machines on 5 separate continents). - more... Both management and my co-workers were an absolute blast, and the environment was light-hearted and fun. The hardest part of the job was managing the number of issues that would crop up, as we'd often face several hundred new tickets a day - n ... - less
There don’t seem to be very many entry level Quality Assurance Tester job available. The few i’ve seen want at least 6 months experience and previous knowledge. Both of which I lack. I’m disabled and have no choice but to work from home. All the job postings i’ve seen are on site only. Oh well, that’s how every entry level job i’ve tried to look into ends up: a dead end of on site jobs. I guess i’ll just try applying for SSI again.
I live in the UK and am currently trying to decide what career I want to do in the future. I’ve been playing vdeo games for as long as I can remeber so I feel like a job in this sector would be great. Unfortunately to get a degree that would mean I could become a game developer I would need to study IT at A-Level and to study it at A-Level I would have to study it at GCSE and unfortunately that was not possible. I feel that becoming a games tester would be satisfying but I would really like to move up in that line of work to become a developer so I was wondering if there was anything that I could do?
When you’re looking at job postings, keep in mind that many employers will still consider candidates even if they only have around 80% of the qualifications. Watch carefully for postings that say things like “2 years experience required, or equivalent experience” because often times college or independent game development is good enough to get an interview.

hey, im 14 on the verge of being 15 and i extremly want a game testing job. ive been sending emails out to gaming sites and all i get back are links that give me no info or answers and no contact numbers. id realy appreciate it if i could get some help out with trying to get a job or contact anything realy that would help would be most appreciated thanks (email is jourdan.turner@gmail.com)
I’ve been playing games for the majority of my life. Even so much that it interfered with my classes to the point of me just getting a G.E.D. Needless to say I dont have much schooling but I tend to look for bugs in games almost everyday. Recently I began editing and modding games using C+ programming and have a bit of experience with it. Would it still be possible for me to be a tester or would I need to go back to school.
Hi Robert. It’s cool to see that you have so much passion for games! If you want to pursue a career making games, you need to figure out how to turn that passion into a skill set that you can use. I actually do think that getting a job as a tester could be a good place for you to start, because you could use your attention and focus to make money while you learn about the process of making games. Then after a while, you may start to see which other roles might be good for you to get into, for example you might make a good game producer.
Hi Carlos, in your question, you mention several different game jobs: writer, programmer, tester, design, and art. So the first thing I’d recommend is to get some clarity on which game job you want to do. If you can identify what it is you want to do, then the path will be clearer. If you’re currently going for a degree in writing or programming, then try to do some game-related projects while you’re in school, to start building your portfolio. Then you’ll be able to apply for jobs directly after college.
Game testing does not typically require specialized education, so you could start applying for jobs now. Search online for game studios or testing companies that have open positions for “game tester” or “QA tester”, and apply online. There are numerous articles on this site on how to write your resume and apply for jobs, look under the “Blog” menu for more information. I wish you luck!

As our Platform/Build Engineer you'll be responsible for creating tools and systems to advance our in-development builds towards a polished, technical release across multiple platforms. You'll collaborate with a small team of developers to optimize efficiency of day-to-day tasks via tools and automation, while improving build performance and supporting QA.
are there any places for these jobs in Canada, and for age complies would 17 work. I can honestly say I’ve played video games since I was around 3-4 since then I slowly went up in gaming. now I’m more into battlefield and call of duty or really any shooters. I have found bugs on my own and done a lot of the things you said that you would have to do as a game tester like writing a report, do you have to be good with code and things like that to make a job?.

Jeez, some of the kids commenting here really can't type well. Either that or they're not good at English. You know it isn't all just fun and games you have to have some English skills because you have to write well detailed reports. You aren't just playing the game you have to analyze it and see where the bugs are or where are the rough patches and then report them to the company. I don't think that this kind of job is for 11 or 13 year olds. I think maybe you should explain that in your article above. This is coming from a 17 year old who has tested and now I make small games with a group of friends. (we're just learning the programs right now). Learning to program is a pain in the butt, but I think rather than small kids looking for jobs in video game testing, I think they should be encouraged to learn more about the games they love. You guys are to young. It bothers me just how many of you believe it is just getting paid to play when it isn't. Well those are just my two cents.
As an integral part of the video game development team, animators and other artists make video games come to life visually. Using specialized software, animators create the series of pictures that form the images in a video game, including the characters and the environment. Artists also design packaging that makes games stand out on store shelves.
Employers typically want applicants who have a thorough knowledge and love for video games. To prepare for testing video games, you may want to gain experience with using different platforms and with different video game genres such as such as puzzle games, first-person shooters, multiplayer games, role-playing games, and online games. Each video game genre has a different feel, and video game testers need to know this information to verify that each game they test fits the genre specifications.

Bethesda Game Studios® is the award-winning development team known around the world for their groundbreaking work on The Elder Scrolls and Fallout series. Creators of the 2006 ‘Game of the Year’, The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion®, the 2008 ‘Game of the Year’, Fallout® 3, the 2011 ‘Game of the Year’, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim®, and most recently, the 2015 ‘Game of the Year’, the record-breaking Fallout® 4. In 2015 the studio also released its first mobile game for iOS and Android devices, Fallout Shelter, which quickly became the top downloaded game in 48 countries and has been downloaded more than 120 million times. Bethesda Game Studios also launched Skyrim VR for PSVR and HTC Vive (PC), and Fallout 4 VR for HTC Vive, as well as Skyrim for Nintendo Switch. Bethesda Game Studios has earned its reputation as one of the industry’s most respected and accomplished game development studios. Bethesda Game Studios has offices in Rockville, Austin, Montreal, and Dallas.
Hi Nafis, if you already know how to program, then you should practice programming video games and start building a portfolio of small game demos. You can apply for game jobs just the same way you apply for any job: Search the Internet or game studio websites to find the job openings, read the requirements to see if you fit 80% of the requirements listed, and then follow the instructions to apply.
Video game testers usually don't require any formal qualifications, although some knowledge of standard office software will be handy. This doesn't mean that some testers don't have BTECs or even degrees in computer games design, but these qualifications aren't necessary, although they can be helpful. Testers do need patience, discipline, organisation and persistence, because playing video games as a job isn't like playing video games on your own time.

There don’t seem to be very many entry level Quality Assurance Tester job available. The few i’ve seen want at least 6 months experience and previous knowledge. Both of which I lack. I’m disabled and have no choice but to work from home. All the job postings i’ve seen are on site only. Oh well, that’s how every entry level job i’ve tried to look into ends up: a dead end of on site jobs. I guess i’ll just try applying for SSI again.


QA testers sign non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) with their employers and can be fired or even sued for divulging information. All the testers we contacted spoke to us on condition of anonymity. We have given them pseudonyms to protect their identities. We have checked each of their credentials. We asked for comments from a variety of games publishers, but have received zero responses.
Hey Jason, I really hope you reply to this because I can use the advice. I’ve been playing games since I was about 8 and ever since I love pointing out glitches and bugs. Because of this I would love to become a game/QA tester. Unfortunately I’ve been looking for advice online to find colleges for a while now, and I’m running around in circles. If you email me I would be able to get into more detail and information about my situation. I greatly appreciate any advice you give me, thank you.
Take the ISTQB exam only through ASTQB. You can register to take the exam through a test center (they are located throughout the U.S. and in almost every country in the world). Be sure it is the ISTQB exam from ASTQB because employers check our official American list of ISTQB certified testers here on this site or by calling our office to confirm you are really certified!

IGT believes in sustaining a workforce that reflects the diversity of the global customers and communities we serve, creating a fair and inclusive culture that enables all our employees to feel valued, respected and engaged. IGT is an equal opportunity employer. We provide equal opportunities without regard to sex, race, color, religion, age, national origin or ancestry, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, genetic information, gender identity or expression, and any other personal attributes protected by federal, state, or other laws.
This is a great entryway into the video game industry. Also known as Beta Testers, Game Testers are responsible for detecting bugs, glitches, artistic flaws – they “play the game to break the game” according to GameDesigning.org. If you enjoy spending 8 hours a day (or more) playing video games, and you’ve got a great eye for details, this could be a job for you. It’s also a great way to learn about how video games are created, by working more closely with the Dev team.

Game testing can most definitely lead to other roles in the game industry.  A common complaint that I hear from candidates is that "I can't apply for this job because I haven't worked in the industry for x years" or "I can't get the experience because I can't get the job to start with".  Game testing is one of the few roles in the entire tech industry where you can get a chance without the years of experience behind you.  That being said, just because you are working as a game tester doesn't mean you're going to be a game designing in 5 years.  You need to continue learning new things and focus on skills and technologies that are relevant to the specific area in the industry you'd like to advance into.  Work on side projects with friends or co-workers that will allow you to continue learning new things, continue taking classes to keep your knowledge current.
At the top of the list of dream jobs for gamers is video game designer. Those who work in this occupation come up with the concepts that eventually become video games. They see those ideas through to fruition by developing storylines and characters, and then guiding them through production. They collaborate with other members of the development team including artists, programmers, and audio engineers. Job titles include game designer, lead designer, and level designer.
As you can see at the top left hand corner that my name is Eric. Im 13 years old and have a deep desire to get a job and make good money fast. I play video games on a regular basis and have a tendency to get stuff done cleanly and quickly. I had my eye on video game testing for quite a while now and also thinking about going further than that in the gaming industry such as coming up with ideas and things they need to fix or put in. As if they can use my imagination to use. For now video game testing. Im hoping to get some information on where I can start and not whether im too young or not.
The perfect job! Drink while working or work while drinking! I need you to playtest a drinking party game (dare type, barnyard themed) while checking various aspects of the game: - which cards aren't working/fun. what changes could be made to them (rewording, rating and etc) - is there a way to balance the game better - is the game even fun? - what's the weakest part of the game? - how did the theme and characters fit this type of game? Requirements: - Testing will need to be conducted 3-4 times in 1 week. - Before testing we'll come up with a simple questionnaire that you'll ask your friends (did you like the game? would you buy it? what did you like most/least about it? would you play it again?). - You will need to print out the game (we'll send you the pdfs of cards) - During the test you will need to gather other info to report on (comments on content, reactions to content, playing time and etc). Comments on content can be written in the doc I'll send you, the rest we can just discuss over skype. - You'll propose changes and correction according to that report. :) If we work well together, I'll ask you to continue playtesting the game and even get involved in other game projects later. :) I would rather pay per playtest. So if you know that you are able to test an x amount of times, send me your offer.
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