I recently got to “play test” a game for the first time. It was at an anime convention and they had a demo for it up and running. I found the game itself kind of slow and a little boring but when I clicked on the trees they would either disappear or, if they were dead, flicker back to life. I thought it was so cool that I immediately started looking for more bugs that the creator had missed, he was right at the table so it was easy to show it to him. I’m trying to choose a career with something I love and wanted to know more about this as an option. I’m interested in play testing but also in translation and programming. Those are all very different fields and I’m wondering what to expect from each one when it comes to jobs and requirements. If you could give me any insight it would be helpful.
Each of these education paths will cover how programs and coding comes together to make the technology like video games, websites and online apps. You’ll also learn why certain programs behave the way they do, and how applications are designed from the ground up. This is highly technical education, but it may also involve theoretical and artistic concepts like color composition, image balance, texture, or user behavior.
Sales/Game Advisors — Sales associates earn starting pay around $8.00 per hour. Also called game advisors, employees provide customers with information on games and products. Other tasks include greeting patrons, completing sales, and keeping stores clean and organized. Read the GameStop game advisor job description to learn about entry-level employment opportunities with the retail chain.

Hi Tim, if you’re getting an Associates in Software Development then that’s a good ground to start out on. Here’s my advice: Build a very small game project while you’re in school, to use as a portfolio piece when you start looking for jobs. Then once you graduate, you can apply to jobs in other cities – just be prepared to move to a new city if you get a job offer. I wish you luck!


We are seeking the industry’s best to help us create, publish and support multiple AAA PC games being developed. Join us, and you’ll have the power of Twitch, AWS, and the entire Amazon ecosystem to shape the future of games. You will work alongside talented industry veterans, including key contributors from dozens of titles: League of Legends, Half Life 2, Left for Dead, Portal, Thief, System Shock 2, Age of Empires, Dawn Of War II, Halo, The Last of Us, Gears of War, The Sims, and Bioshock.

Hello , Im a 15 year old teen that would like to get into the game testing industry. I have good teamwork and also leadership communication skills. The consoles that I have are an Ipod 4th gen. Xbox 360, and an apple computer. I play about 9 hours a day on the weekdays and 19 on weekends. Though I would prefer an at home job cause I am currently in highschool. I would really like some feedback or maybe some job opportunities thanks also I am very good at locating glitches and will provide a very detailed report on every one I find. Please email me at jcastorillo@gmail.com .

I’m afraid I can’t help with financial advice. But as far as your game design goals, I think it will be hard to start a career in games in Alaska, because there aren’t any game studios up there that I know of. The closest US city with a strong game industry would be Seattle, so one strategy might be to move to Seattle and get a non-game job while you pursue a video game design certificate or degree. But you’d want to be sure that your health and finances are in order before making such a move. Be smart about it.

so iv loved gameing since i was little and i play about 40 hours a week. i just never get bored of them. the question i have is i want to become a tester first so i can get some feel for the gaming industries before i go ahead and start trying to do a degree in game design and programing. the closest school to me is art instutute of wasington. wich is acouple of hours away. the ting i want to know is im not that i cant draw all that well to be honest. how would that effect on getting a degree in this field.
Hi Dalton, some testing jobs are fine and others might require a lot of overtime. It just depends on the company you’re at, some companies are well-run and some aren’t. And some are well-run, but sometimes external factors cause problems with the game’s shipping schedule and overtime might be required. I’d recommend doing some research on any company before you take a job offer to find out whether their employees seem to be happy or not.
I read through many of these comments and noticed that many of the questions are from younger and eager future designers who hopefully have a fantastic career laid before them. However, I am 24 years of age and have struggled to find a way to break into the gaming industry in Arizona. I am fluent in a handful of coding languages with experience and will be concluding my Associates program for Software Development in in the next few months but none of that means much if there is no ground to find my footing on. The kicker is, I cannot leave this state without having a solid foundation laid out in another state, but I do not want that to stop me from gaining professional experience in the Game Dev industry.
This can vary widely depending on the specific team/project you are working on. I've placed some testers into roles where they literally are pushing buttons for an entire day waiting for an error to occur, and other roles where a tester is sitting right beside the game developers testing a game in real time as game code is being written.  There are some companies that work extreme hours in order to finish projects on time but from what I've seen over the years this is not as common as it used to be.  There always will be crunch time where you can expect to work some OT, but extended periods of OT for months on end are not that common anymore.
At the top of the list of dream jobs for gamers is video game designer. Those who work in this occupation come up with the concepts that eventually become video games. They see those ideas through to fruition by developing storylines and characters, and then guiding them through production. They collaborate with other members of the development team including artists, programmers, and audio engineers. Job titles include game designer, lead designer, and level designer.
i practically live and breathe video games. I can talk about them for hours. (ask my boyfriend.) when people tell me that they never got into video games it almost breaks my heart a little bit. but, I am going to college, and since I’d like to have my career based around video games whether it would be designing them, programming, or testing them, what kind of classes should I take? 3D animation? graphic design? does it all depend? I would love to make this into a career so I would like to be able to have some degrees and proper knowledge to make my resume more impressive, and eventually climb the ladder.
Hey ther Im from dominican republic , can i be a video game tester? I love games like resident evil . Castlevania and many fps . And as you can see i speek english hahha also german , french and ofcourse spanish . I live on dominican republic but i can travel to usa and also would like to know if there is some way to work from home as a tester . Thx . Greatings : carlos

Or, to put it in other terms, rather than sitting around playing games all day, you'll be sitting around playing the same part of a game over and over. And not the climactic boss fight, either – at least, not necessarily. You're just as likely to be assigned to make sure that the different sections of the pause menu work in all different areas of the game.
Thank you for the advice and knowledge on Game Testers. I am currently in college taking the Game Simulation and Development program. I’ve been studying this for about 2 years in college and got the basics down. How would I find a stepping stone for becoming a game play tester? I don’t want to try for big named companies and etc… I want to actually build a portfolio on testing games, Designing games, and programming games but I don’t know what to look for when finding something where I can give my first professional attempt to test a video game or project.
I read all of your post and since I've worked for Nexon, I know what is meaning working as a Quality Assurance in a serious place. It's not just playing the game... Sometimes it could be very tiring, especially when you are forced to test a game that you don't like for over 1 or more years. Otherwise, I wish to you all a huge luck for your future experience as a Game Tester/QA.
The perfect job! Drink while working or work while drinking! I need you to playtest a drinking party game (dare type, barnyard themed) while checking various aspects of the game: - which cards aren't working/fun. what changes could be made to them (rewording, rating and etc) - is there a way to balance the game better - is the game even fun? - what's the weakest part of the game? - how did the theme and characters fit this type of game? Requirements: - Testing will need to be conducted 3-4 times in 1 week. - Before testing we'll come up with a simple questionnaire that you'll ask your friends (did you like the game? would you buy it? what did you like most/least about it? would you play it again?). - You will need to print out the game (we'll send you the pdfs of cards) - During the test you will need to gather other info to report on (comments on content, reactions to content, playing time and etc). Comments on content can be written in the doc I'll send you, the rest we can just discuss over skype. - You'll propose changes and correction according to that report. :) If we work well together, I'll ask you to continue playtesting the game and even get involved in other game projects later. :) I would rather pay per playtest. So if you know that you are able to test an x amount of times, send me your offer.
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