I've seen a wide variety of people succeed in game testing roles.  Everyone from a recent College graduate with a Computer Science Degree (or equivalent) to someone who has been working in a manual labor or retail position and looking for a way to get into the tech industry. I work with a wide variety of companies and managers and each has their own ideal candidate.  Not everyone that applies to a specific game testing role will be a fit due to specific needs of each team. That being said,  there are some skillsets and characteristics that are common across all roles: strong written and verbal communication skills, excellent troubleshooting and problem solving, and demonstrated ability to work at a high level within a team environment while also able to be an independent contributor. Of course, and most important, being a huge fan of gaming. 
started off as a picker then quickly made my way to fill Active/stocker which is filling empty slots. or replenish product in which need's to be picked and after that was done help assist in picking or packing. then moved replenishment driver/order picker and our team was in charge of supply all stock. to the pickers and fill Activator's also assisting - more... in special projects directed by the managers or supervisor. I was able to obtain perfect attendance award twice for being at work one hour prior to scheduled time.the work place was amazing the different culture and new people and different poin ... - less

Hi,I am only 17year old but I’ve played so many games.Actually I’ve been playing since I was 5,and got my first gaming computer.I would love to play video games and be paid for it.I know that it’s not like that,but it’s harder than it sounds,but I searched it and I know what I have to deal with.I am spending arround 17-20hours per day just playing games,every type,I never get bored of it.The bad thing is that no one supports me and I live in a country that can’t provide games….So that’s how I ll never be a game tester.
Attitude: Companies look for testers who have a good attitude, are hard workers, and can be fun teammates. They’ll avoid you if you’re overly negative, sarcastic, arrogant, or angry. If that sounds like you, then start practicing a positive attitude now, so it will become a habit by the time you apply for jobs. No matter how skilled you are at testing, nobody wants to have a jerk on their team.

Of course, this is a little bit of a stretch, considering that the number of video game jobs actually on the market is very minimal. With the right determination and effort, however, getting your foot into the industry is possible. Like many careers involving constantly-evolving knowledge and technology, there are always new opportunities: Game developer opportunities are expected to increase by about 11% annually over the next few years and the US Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates occupation growth of 6% from 2014 to 2024.
Video game or product testers may also be known as quality control inspectors. These professionals verify that products meet certain standards, and testers try out products to determine if there are any flaws. For example, video game testers play games specifically to look for problems, such as program glitches, broken applications or non-functioning visual effects.
Over 40% of homes in the United States own video game consoles. Games like Super Mario Brothers, Halo, Wii Fit, Final Fantasy, Metroid, SSX, Grand Theft Auto, Shrek Forever After, and 1000s of others are being played for enjoyment and competition across the country. It takes a long time for these games to be designed, created, and debugged. No video game would ever make it to the store’s shelf it wasn’t for a video game tester.
Compounding the physical and mental stresses that QA testers endure was the complete lack of job security. "During training, they told us it's not a matter of 'if' you'll be laid-off but 'when'," says Keith. "They flat-out tell you that what makes a good employee is the number of bugs you find and it is this number that will determine if you are kept on or not." This methodology, however, did not accurately take into account the quality of dedication that went into a project. "Here I was recreating and logging how to get stuck in the tail of a helicopter. I would have other testers comment on how much they liked my bugs, because I was one of those guys who would be able to reproduce those bugs that stumped everyone else, but when it came to the end of the project, the guy next to me had more bugs, so I was laid-off and he was not."
The Community Manager’s responsibilities support the organization’s established core programs, including events and new initiatives. The role also includes social listening and analytics to stay informed about industry trends and opportunities and direct engagement with key constituencies, including game developers and cause-oriented organizations.
Fun working environment! Get inspired by all the artwork from Greek!Work with friends! Many vacancies availableLOCATION:JurongRESPONSIBILITIES:Ensure that equipment are in orderExplain artworks or interactive activities to the visitors if help is required by the visitors.Assist visitors with simple activitiesREQUIREMENT:3 months & aboveWORKING HOUR:Any 5 days per week including weekends as assigne ...
Hi Kyler, most game testing jobs don’t require a degree unless they also require some computer programming skills. In high school, I’d recommend taking some computer classes, maybe a programming class, and technical writing. (Or whichever equivalents your school might offer.) Many people move away from their home town to get a job after school, it’s normal to move to a new city where there are more jobs in your field.
As an integral part of the video game development team, animators and other artists make video games come to life visually. Using specialized software, animators create the series of pictures that form the images in a video game, including the characters and the environment. Artists also design packaging that makes games stand out on store shelves.
Hi, there, my name is Robert. I’m a gamer that loves JRPGs, and would love to be in this business, but I feel you need to know rocket-science do be in this industry. Am I wrong? I also have no college degree. Is a game tester the best way to start, or trying to a make phone game, if I want to be a game designer? Or should I go to a college? I’m lost.
Jeez, some of the kids commenting here really can't type well. Either that or they're not good at English. You know it isn't all just fun and games you have to have some English skills because you have to write well detailed reports. You aren't just playing the game you have to analyze it and see where the bugs are or where are the rough patches and then report them to the company. I don't think that this kind of job is for 11 or 13 year olds. I think maybe you should explain that in your article above. This is coming from a 17 year old who has tested and now I make small games with a group of friends. (we're just learning the programs right now). Learning to program is a pain in the butt, but I think rather than small kids looking for jobs in video game testing, I think they should be encouraged to learn more about the games they love. You guys are to young. It bothers me just how many of you believe it is just getting paid to play when it isn't. Well those are just my two cents.
Nearly any game studio needs testers, and some of the big companies like Nintendo, EA, and Microsoft employ hundreds of game testers either directly or through temp agencies. Like any job, you can start by searching for job postings near your city using the video game job search tool. You can also search on popular tech-industry job sites like Monster.com, or on job aggregator sites like Indeed.com.
We are seeking the industry’s best to help us create, publish and support multiple AAA PC games being developed. Join us, and you’ll have the power of Twitch, AWS, and the entire Amazon ecosystem to shape the future of games. You will work alongside talented industry veterans, including key contributors from dozens of titles: League of Legends, Half Life 2, Left for Dead, Portal, Thief, System Shock 2, Age of Empires, Dawn Of War II, Halo, The Last of Us, Gears of War, The Sims, and Bioshock.
Temporary Mascot / Helper (3 Oct to 31 Oct, Changi Airport)Job Descriptions:-Company: One of the Retail Shops in Changi Airport is hiring both Mascot and Temp HelperMascot's Job:• Wearing costume, this Mascot will need to wave to customers• Walk around the transit zone in Changi AirportEvent Helper's Job:• Sort and pack vouchers /free gifts• Approach customers and invite them for game sessions (sp ...
Hi Dalton, some testing jobs are fine and others might require a lot of overtime. It just depends on the company you’re at, some companies are well-run and some aren’t. And some are well-run, but sometimes external factors cause problems with the game’s shipping schedule and overtime might be required. I’d recommend doing some research on any company before you take a job offer to find out whether their employees seem to be happy or not.
Hi Tim, if you’re getting an Associates in Software Development then that’s a good ground to start out on. Here’s my advice: Build a very small game project while you’re in school, to use as a portfolio piece when you start looking for jobs. Then once you graduate, you can apply to jobs in other cities – just be prepared to move to a new city if you get a job offer. I wish you luck!

:Looking for Temporary Teaching AssistantsWorking Hours: Retail hours (3-5 days including weekends) Working Duration: November for 6 monthsWorking Location: Novena /Jurong East/CCK/Tampines/Marina ParadeSalary: $8.50/hJob Scope:o being at the 2T reporting station and/or classroom 10 minutes before class startso receiving students when they arrive for classo helping students to settle dow ...
Work at a company that has friendly, fun, nice people working there. You may be working very long hours for days or weeks before each game release, which will be much more enjoyable if the people you’re working with aren’t jerks. Research the studio on Glassdoor.com, and ask people who may have worked there in the past. Avoid companies that seem to be full of jerks.
A video game tester is expected to take a wide range of actions in the game to identify any bugs or glitches. Essentially, a bug is something wrong with the programming, and there can be a huge variety of them. A bug comes when a player gets trapped in a certain spot, or when a movement graphic doesn’t work properly on a specific character. There are literally millions of possible bugs that could be in the game, but thanks to game testers, most games are released nearly flawless.
This is one reason why it’s best to try and get a full-time employment (“FTE”) testing job at an established game company. Most regions require that employers provide medical benefits to their full-time employees, so it’s often a safer way to go. If you can’t find and FTE job initially, you may want to consider working as a temp at first, just to learn the job and get some experience on your resume.
It might surprise you to learn that strong writing and communication skills are essential for a good video game tester. The ability to write in a clear, brief, and effective manner will help you describe the glitches you find and how you found them. Your clear writing will give developers a clear path to addressing the issue and creating a fix. You don’t have to be a poetic, colorful author; you need to be a clear, concise, and detailed communicator.
Most game testing jobs are near the larger game studios, which happen to be in the larger cities around the world. You may be able to find testing jobs in smaller towns and cities, but if you’re positive that you want to break into the game industry then you’ll have the best chances of finding work if you can move to one of the major cities for game development.
Hi Dylan, if you aren’t going to college near any game developers or game testing companies, then you probably won’t be able to get a job as a tester as most testing jobs are on-site jobs. If you can get hired as a tester, then the company will provide all the hardware and game systems you need, so it’s okay that you don’t have your system any more.
Thank you so much for all of your answers to those questions, it has really helped me. I want to eventually work my way up to either being a programmer at valve or ubisoft. But I want to start off my video game career as a game tester. But just a quick question, what would it take to be a game tester for a company like ubisoft or valve because it would make it much easier working my way up on the job ladder for a company that I want to work for. And if they are only looking for experienced testers to work for them what do you recommend as a good company to test games for that would accept new testers?
Game testing can most definitely lead to other roles in the game industry.  A common complaint that I hear from candidates is that "I can't apply for this job because I haven't worked in the industry for x years" or "I can't get the experience because I can't get the job to start with".  Game testing is one of the few roles in the entire tech industry where you can get a chance without the years of experience behind you.  That being said, just because you are working as a game tester doesn't mean you're going to be a game designing in 5 years.  You need to continue learning new things and focus on skills and technologies that are relevant to the specific area in the industry you'd like to advance into.  Work on side projects with friends or co-workers that will allow you to continue learning new things, continue taking classes to keep your knowledge current.
We are seeking the industry’s best to help us create, publish and support multiple AAA PC games being developed. Join us, and you’ll have the power of Twitch, AWS, and the entire Amazon ecosystem to shape the future of games. You will work alongside talented industry veterans, including key contributors from dozens of titles: League of Legends, Half Life 2, Left for Dead, Portal, Thief, System Shock 2, Age of Empires, Dawn Of War II, Halo, The Last of Us, Gears of War, The Sims, and Bioshock.
Online Game Tester charge a flat rate no matter how much you earn. Instead of charging 25-50% percentage of what you earn (like other companies do), we want to make a simple and cheap solution. The cost cover maintenance, creating the job database and partnerships with 2k, Rockstar etc, keeping our tools, software and content up-2-date, e-books worth over 49 USD, guides, video tutorials, life-time support and much more. We have tried to lower cost to a minimum.
As an integral part of the video game development team, animators and other artists make video games come to life visually. Using specialized software, animators create the series of pictures that form the images in a video game, including the characters and the environment. Artists also design packaging that makes games stand out on store shelves.
When a game is in development, there are many different bugs that are often easy to find. To write it up, you’d type your report into a specialized “issue tracker” software (for example, a program called Jira) that has form fields for each piece of information the game team wants to know about. Usually things like, what do you do to make the bug happen? What area of the game is it in? How “bad” is the bug on a scale of 1 to 5?
T. Thomas is a General Manager for a top Game Industry Game Developer saying “We like to hire the best people for our QA Team. This means we will hire some that proves to have skills in testing video games. When we look at all the employment applications for Game Testing, those who have qualified skills are the ones who will get hired. We were curious about http://get-paid-to-play-games.milehightopsites.com learning from a pro game tester. Proven technical learning skills are proven here to learn about game testing. This is not endorsement of the website. However, it speaks volumes about game testing! We feel anyone who get these skills will be game testing video games.“

Hi Satadala, I think you have enough experience to get a job as a game tester. So it’s hard to know why you have not been hired yet, you may just need to be persistent and keep applying. You should also try applying for smaller game studios, as EA/Ubisoft/Etc. likely receive hundreds of applications each week. You may have better luck with a smaller studio to start out.


Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?
1. Usually there’s a team of testers assigned to a game. They work together, but each one might be assigned a certain part of the game such as combat or AI, or it might be divided up by area such as level or character. Each tester submits their own bug reports, and then re-tests the bug once the development team has marked the bug as “fixed” in the next build.
my name is jose barbosa. I searched long and hard where to go to apply for a game tester. I want to get paid for something i love to do.I love to play video games alot. I went to the search bar and it kept sending me to sites that states to pay to become a member so they can get me out that the companies that are looking for game testers but it just seemed alil iffy for me to provide them info about me and my finances. I just want to know where do i go to apply for it because i known a guy once who was doing it and making good money doing it too.
“I used to think I was super lucky, but then I realized that those hours I spent every week on the gaming club at Emerson watching eSports, following League of Legends and playing video games were all a part of it,” she says. “Many people might not think of that as professional experience, but it’s the same thing as a film major who watches a lot of movies.”
We Are Expanding!! We are Looking For Game Masters to Facilitate our Game Booths at our Roadshows/Events!!Easy Job!! Wanna have fun and work at the same time? Enjoy interacting with children?Come join us now!! We are looking for Outgoing and Confident individuals who posses a Passion for the Educational Industry to facilitate our Game Booths at our Roadshows/Events. Job Scope - Faci ...
×