Hi Jackie, it’s interesting that you mention an interest in translation. Do you mean that you’re bilingual or multilingual? If so, you should investigate jobs as at companies that do “localization testing” because they employ translators and also testers. One company I’ve worked with before is Babel Media, so that could be a good place to start your search.
The lead programmer manages the software engineering of a game, developing the technical specification and then delegating different elements. They usually compile technical documentation and ensure the quality, effectiveness and appropriateness of all the game code. They also manage the production of the different ‘builds’ of a game, ensuring that coding bugs are fixed, and making sure everything happens on schedule. The lead programmer must also provide support and guidance to the programming team, which can include specialism in games engine programming, graphics programming, gamesplay, physics, artificial intelligence (AI), tools development, networking and build engineering.
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: German (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia
I started this website because there’s very little information out there about how video game companies work on the inside, or how to get started in the industry. I’ve spent literally hundreds of hours, of my own personal time, to write dozens of articles to give you insight into making games as a career. And here they all are, all of them, for free. FOR FREE!
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: Polish (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia
When a game is in development, there are many different bugs that are often easy to find. To write it up, you’d type your report into a specialized “issue tracker” software (for example, a program called Jira) that has form fields for each piece of information the game team wants to know about. Usually things like, what do you do to make the bug happen? What area of the game is it in? How “bad” is the bug on a scale of 1 to 5?
Hi Robert, you’re right that there’s a lot to learn to be in the video game industry – but that’s the same with any industry. The sooner you start learning, the sooner you’ll get good at it. 🙂 A college degree isn’t required, but a degree or at least a certificate would help a lot when you’re applying for jobs. If you don’t know where to start, then I’d suggest maybe taking a game-related certificate from a local college if possible – it will teach you the basics, and help you start making a portfolio. Best of luck!
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hi Mr. Jason my Name is Dalton I have been currently working as a student in the Cascades jobcorps in Sedro Woolley, but frankly I’m from Marysville WA, I wanted to ask you if a game tester/QA tester gets any kind of Social life while trying to maintain his current life, I have been told from one person that it’s life crushing and from another it’s a can-do Career, but I wanted to know from your point of view
Technically, you need to be at least the minimum working age in your country, state, or province. But practically, most game companies won’t hire people as testers until they turn 18 years old. If you’re not old enough yet, you can start preparing for your future job by following some of the advice listed elsewhere in this article, and listen to my podcast about getting a job in games.
hey, im 14 on the verge of being 15 and i extremly want a game testing job. ive been sending emails out to gaming sites and all i get back are links that give me no info or answers and no contact numbers. id realy appreciate it if i could get some help out with trying to get a job or contact anything realy that would help would be most appreciated thanks (email is jourdan.turner@gmail.com)
Hi Mario, there actually are several game companies in Italy – check out this helpful list of Italian game studios at gamedevmap.com. If you eventually want to live abroad, you could start out at an Italian studio and then apply for jobs in a different country with more game dev opportunities (such as England or France) later on, after you get some professional experience.
I finished High-school in June this year. I’ve decided to build my life around gaming, and I’m having trouble doing so. Considering a very popular method right now is streaming, and video to sources like twitch, youtube, etc… I’ve done a bit of that to no avail; due to the fact that most of those sources require a huge fan base to even partner with them, let alone get payed.
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Besides a typical “game tester” job, there’s also a job that you may not have heard of yet called an “SDET” (pronounced “ESS-det”). That stands for “software design/development engineer in test.” It’s a cool job that’s basically a tester that writes computer code – code that tests the game in an automated way. So it’s like a testing job, but the salary is much higher since it requires programming skills. A programming degree or some programming classes would be really helpful for landing a job as an SDET.
As our Platform/Build Engineer you'll be responsible for creating tools and systems to advance our in-development builds towards a polished, technical release across multiple platforms. You'll collaborate with a small team of developers to optimize efficiency of day-to-day tasks via tools and automation, while improving build performance and supporting QA.
This is one reason why it’s best to try and get a full-time employment (“FTE”) testing job at an established game company. Most regions require that employers provide medical benefits to their full-time employees, so it’s often a safer way to go. If you can’t find and FTE job initially, you may want to consider working as a temp at first, just to learn the job and get some experience on your resume.
Game testing jobs generally don’t require advanced degrees. Since you’re going for post-secondary degrees, then it might be more applicable for you to work toward a job as a video game programmer, rather than a tester. In either case, start by looking up job postings for game studios near your home to see what requirements they list, and then start working toward those requirements. There are a number of large game studios with a presence in India such as Ubisoft, EA, Microsoft and more.
Work at a company that has friendly, fun, nice people working there. You may be working very long hours for days or weeks before each game release, which will be much more enjoyable if the people you’re working with aren’t jerks. Research the studio on Glassdoor.com, and ask people who may have worked there in the past. Avoid companies that seem to be full of jerks.
I recently just asked on GameTesters.Net, about whether or not the testers get to keep the games or send them back, now i’ve been into gaming a lot, i’ve played many games ever since i was a kid, yes this goes way back from when i had Pokemon Stadium for the Nintendo 64, it was the very first system i ever had as a child, i don’t have it anymore, wish i did though, but anyways, this isn’t about a Gamer’s childhood or their very first game console, this is about bein paid, to be a Gamer, now i’d love to be paid just to play video games, it has been a dream of mine to be paid, just to play video games, i think that would be top notch, an awesome, plus it is something i enjoy doing, so if anyone can tell me how to land a job like this, just let me know in a reply.
are there any places for these jobs in Canada, and for age complies would 17 work. I can honestly say I’ve played video games since I was around 3-4 since then I slowly went up in gaming. now I’m more into battlefield and call of duty or really any shooters. I have found bugs on my own and done a lot of the things you said that you would have to do as a game tester like writing a report, do you have to be good with code and things like that to make a job?.

Hi Kyler, your parents will want you (and rightly so) to pick a career that has more long-term growth potential, like Game Programmer or Game Artist. Think of Game Tester as a job that could help you start out in a video game career, but not something to do for your whole life. For example I started as a game tester, but then I took programming classes and eventually moved into a job at the same company as a game designer and programmer.
Hey Jason, I really hope you reply to this because I can use the advice. I’ve been playing games since I was about 8 and ever since I love pointing out glitches and bugs. Because of this I would love to become a game/QA tester. Unfortunately I’ve been looking for advice online to find colleges for a while now, and I’m running around in circles. If you email me I would be able to get into more detail and information about my situation. I greatly appreciate any advice you give me, thank you.
Hi, I’m in my first semester in college now and I was thinking about going into gaming since I’ve been playing games for a long time since I can remember. I am thinking about changing my major into something like programming, but I never took a class in high school that was computer oriented and such. I was wondering do you think it would be a good idea to go ahead and change my major or not since I don’t really know about programming?
I asked one of my friends who has run several QA groups over the years, and he’s heard good things about uTest. They provide a “crowdsourced” testing service, and he thinks that many of their QA employees work from home. But in general, if you want solid, full-time employment as a game tester, you won’t be able to work from home because nearly all game companies do not hire work-from-home testers. In fact, please be careful, because there are several scam websites that you need to watch out for. Learn more in my podcast about work from home testing scams. If it seems too good to be true… it is.
I have been playing games ever sense I was 7 maybe younger and I haven’t really clicked with anything else I have don’t still don’t know what type of career I want because I am currently in school for auto but I don’t think its going to work out and I am going to go for welding but not sure how that’s going to go but I always play games every day so I was wondering If I have very little computer skills but every now and then I have great game ideas is there any thing I could do in the gaming world with that or not I mean once I was so bored that I was talking with my friends on xbox360 for over 3 hours and we pretty much created an awesome game in our heads didn’t right any of it down but idk just figured I would see if any of that could be used for any job in the gaming world?????

I enjoyed my time at Multiplay. A typical day included helping a large number of customers through ticket and live chat interfaces with issues surrounding the operation of their game servers. I learned some new techniques regarding the rapid deployment of game updates to a large number of servers (often 20-30, or more, machines on 5 separate continents). - more... Both management and my co-workers were an absolute blast, and the environment was light-hearted and fun. The hardest part of the job was managing the number of issues that would crop up, as we'd often face several hundred new tickets a day - n ... - less
We are posting this on the Design Notes first because we ALWAYS want to get people from our community. You all know the game as well (and sometimes better O_O) than we do, so it makes sense to bring new help onto the team from our player community! Real life has stolen some of our testers away over the last few months, (shakes fist at real life), so it's time to buff our team count!
Hi Kyler, your parents will want you (and rightly so) to pick a career that has more long-term growth potential, like Game Programmer or Game Artist. Think of Game Tester as a job that could help you start out in a video game career, but not something to do for your whole life. For example I started as a game tester, but then I took programming classes and eventually moved into a job at the same company as a game designer and programmer.

my name is jose barbosa. I searched long and hard where to go to apply for a game tester. I want to get paid for something i love to do.I love to play video games alot. I went to the search bar and it kept sending me to sites that states to pay to become a member so they can get me out that the companies that are looking for game testers but it just seemed alil iffy for me to provide them info about me and my finances. I just want to know where do i go to apply for it because i known a guy once who was doing it and making good money doing it too.
The level editor designs a portion of the game usually referred to as a ‘level’, specifying all possible actions and events, the environment, layout, visuals, characters and objects and their behaviours. The level editor sketches ideas to be worked out in 3D and tested. They will also draw up an inventory of level ‘assets’ (objects and programming requirements), always maintaining an understanding of advanced technologies, technical constraints and what makes entertaining gameplay. The work of a level designer ensures that each new stage of the gameplay presents new challenges for the player.

I really like video games but I have a short attention span because I have ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder it doesn’t bother me when I am playing games only when I am doing other things like writing or reading I am an excellent reader but not a great writer I really want to be a video game tester I already try to find bugs and glitches in the games I play it helps to lengthen the game I have medicine that I take for it but it makes me a bit A-social I don’t get aggressive or any thing like that but I can be kinda shy would that be a problem.

started off as a picker then quickly made my way to fill Active/stocker which is filling empty slots. or replenish product in which need's to be picked and after that was done help assist in picking or packing. then moved replenishment driver/order picker and our team was in charge of supply all stock. to the pickers and fill Activator's also assisting - more... in special projects directed by the managers or supervisor. I was able to obtain perfect attendance award twice for being at work one hour prior to scheduled time.the work place was amazing the different culture and new people and different poin ... - less
This next question is kinda off topic, but were you, at a time, ever a game tester? If so, was is for a big company? I always worry that I won’t get hired, because, since it has to do with video games. A lot of people are going to want to apply for the positions. I’m also aware of the work involved in game testing. I know about the “bug hunting”. The reports about the bug found. What if after hours and hours of searching, you don’t find a bug or miss it by the slightest bit? Would you lose the job? And if you lose the job, would you have to send the equipment back?

Employers typically want applicants who have a thorough knowledge and love for video games. To prepare for testing video games, you may want to gain experience with using different platforms and with different video game genres such as such as puzzle games, first-person shooters, multiplayer games, role-playing games, and online games. Each video game genre has a different feel, and video game testers need to know this information to verify that each game they test fits the genre specifications.


I read through many of these comments and noticed that many of the questions are from younger and eager future designers who hopefully have a fantastic career laid before them. However, I am 24 years of age and have struggled to find a way to break into the gaming industry in Arizona. I am fluent in a handful of coding languages with experience and will be concluding my Associates program for Software Development in in the next few months but none of that means much if there is no ground to find my footing on. The kicker is, I cannot leave this state without having a solid foundation laid out in another state, but I do not want that to stop me from gaining professional experience in the Game Dev industry.
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