Funcom is looking to hire not 1 but 2 talented External Producers to handle the management of the company’s publishing projects. Opportunity locations: Raleigh, NC USA & Oslo, Norway The role’s responsibilities include the continuous communication with developers, the management of work pipelines, project finances, team management, internal and external resource management and the successful timely launch of the projects/titles.
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: Polish (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia
If being laid off isn't bad enough, finding continued employment is also difficult. "Everyone tries to advance to positions that aren't available and won't get," says Phil. While this may also be true for other careers within the games industry, he believes this problem is compounded because testers are often hired through a staffing company and not internally. Many publishers won't offer a reference because of contractor policies. Most testers are not, technically, employees.
There don’t seem to be very many entry level Quality Assurance Tester job available. The few i’ve seen want at least 6 months experience and previous knowledge. Both of which I lack. I’m disabled and have no choice but to work from home. All the job postings i’ve seen are on site only. Oh well, that’s how every entry level job i’ve tried to look into ends up: a dead end of on site jobs. I guess i’ll just try applying for SSI again.

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While this overwhelmingly looks like a gimmick, from your picture, Jason, to the e-book, this site has a lot of information and I hope it is true. I’ve done my homework and saw you were a part of Griptonite Games, which made largely handheld console games, which are based mostly on movies. Knowing this I am a bit skeptical because handheld games certainly can’t be as difficult to make as console games, and games based on movies are notorious for being bad. So how would you know about joining those big companies, or making “big” games? To be honest, I never heard of Griptonite Games until just now. Could you ease my skepticism here?
If you are searching for a career that lets you work from your own home, then look to the video game industry. While some game testers will work in-house for major companies, work from home is a very common practice. This means that many testers have no daily schedule and no boss hovering over their work. However, once an assignment is given, you are expected to meet specific deadlines. How you meet those deadlines is entirely up to you. Often the game developer will set individual milestones, breaking down the work into smaller segments.

Before you change your major, I think you should try taking an online programming class to see if you like programming. (CodeSchool has some great classes, and they’re inexpensive – maybe try their JavaScript classes.) If you find out that programming is interesting for you once you spend a few hours learning it, then you might consider changing your major.
Game testers ensure the quality and condition of video and mobile games for game production companies. Game testers also test hardware, such as gaming consoles and controllers to ensure quality, durability, and functionality. A core responsibility of a game tester is to identify bugs, glitches, and problems that potentially inhibit game operation and obstruct user experience. Also, game testers collaborate with visual designers and programmers to remedy the problems they find in games.
“I used to think I was super lucky, but then I realized that those hours I spent every week on the gaming club at Emerson watching eSports, following League of Legends and playing video games were all a part of it,” she says. “Many people might not think of that as professional experience, but it’s the same thing as a film major who watches a lot of movies.”
After you use the link for minors under sixteen for the application on the parent's behalf and there is a link to a Microsoft connect thing. When you click the link, it says the Microsoft connect thing has been expired over a decade ago. Please help. I really want to figure out how to do this and nowhere else can I find out how. There are so many people doing it, and it's genuinely frustrating that its so difficult to figure out how. Do you know what to do?
are there any places for these jobs in Canada, and for age complies would 17 work. I can honestly say I’ve played video games since I was around 3-4 since then I slowly went up in gaming. now I’m more into battlefield and call of duty or really any shooters. I have found bugs on my own and done a lot of the things you said that you would have to do as a game tester like writing a report, do you have to be good with code and things like that to make a job?.
I have been playing games ever sense I was 7 maybe younger and I haven’t really clicked with anything else I have don’t still don’t know what type of career I want because I am currently in school for auto but I don’t think its going to work out and I am going to go for welding but not sure how that’s going to go but I always play games every day so I was wondering If I have very little computer skills but every now and then I have great game ideas is there any thing I could do in the gaming world with that or not I mean once I was so bored that I was talking with my friends on xbox360 for over 3 hours and we pretty much created an awesome game in our heads didn’t right any of it down but idk just figured I would see if any of that could be used for any job in the gaming world?????
Hey Jason, I have read so much on become a QA tester and have a few questions. First I’m going to start off by saying I am a successful BDA for All State insurance, I am 27 years old, and I have 3 diploma’s all in the business field. You might be wondering why I would be interested in pursuing a video game testing job as I do have a successful career already but to be honest gaming is the thing I love the most and I’ve never had that feeling of waking up and being excited to go to work, I kind of just do it cause the money is good and its what I’ve got at the moment so I roll with it. I now understand that you need to do a job you love over a job that pays well because its the thing you do most of the time! and lets be honest, I don’t get excited everyday about selling insurance or handling someone’s claim. I have been a hardcore gamer since I was 5 years old, all started with a Sega genesis. Ive played competitive in league of legends, heroes of the storm, overwatch, cs:go, wow arena (when it was big), I’ve literally played all these gamers with the best of the best and at one point was sponsored by 2 different companies to pursue a competitive scene in overwatch and league of legends. So my gaming experience and skills at games are well above average, as well as my knowledge for games themselves (I’ve played so many!) My question to you is do you think it is possible for someone being 27 years old to get into the gaming career? Am I limited by my age? And I also live in Canada (close to Toronto) and I feel Canada may not have the best gaming studio’s, if any near me at all….. Now I tried reading a few things from your book and tried using your “search for studio’s near you” engine but I don’t think its geared for Canadians. What steps do you think I should take to pursue this dream I have to become a game tester or even just work with a gaming company through marketing or design, writing (I have a very smart mind and I feel I can create a very good gaming story line, Ive created 2 previous games with my friends and the story line was killer! Story was all me!) etc.
started off as a picker then quickly made my way to fill Active/stocker which is filling empty slots. or replenish product in which need's to be picked and after that was done help assist in picking or packing. then moved replenishment driver/order picker and our team was in charge of supply all stock. to the pickers and fill Activator's also assisting - more... in special projects directed by the managers or supervisor. I was able to obtain perfect attendance award twice for being at work one hour prior to scheduled time.the work place was amazing the different culture and new people and different poin ... - less
A video game company doesn't function like your typical workplace. Rather than working regular office hours throughout the year, the company goes into "crunch mode" as a game's release date approaches. Because release dates are inflexible – the company has to get the game out by Christmas, the television ad time has been purchased months in advance, and so on – if there's more work that needs to be done, everyone just has to work harder. Any video game tester can tell you that crunch time means long, long days, running on an intoxicating blend of caffeine, junk food and sleep deprivation.
According to the Gamasutra Salary Survey of 2014, the online publication for Game Developer Magazine, the average salary for testers is about $54,833 annually. The same study found that testers with over three years of experience average roughly $48,426 a year. If you work for over six years, you can expect to reach an average of $62,885 a year, and those with a master’s degree earned on average $65,000.
Companies often pay contractors a higher base pay in lieu of benefits, but Danny only made $10 an hour. Extrapolating this data, means the average salary for a full-time position is roughly a meager $20,800. The federal minimum wage is $7.25, but game-testers are information workers, not burger flippers. It takes skill and knowledge to test and judge a game.

We are posting this on the Design Notes first because we ALWAYS want to get people from our community. You all know the game as well (and sometimes better O_O) than we do, so it makes sense to bring new help onto the team from our player community! Real life has stolen some of our testers away over the last few months, (shakes fist at real life), so it's time to buff our team count!


During testing, the video game tester’s trained eye looks for problems that gamers will face. After a tester identifies a glitch, the problem must be written up and submitted to game designers to fix. This process can be challenging and it may mean replaying the same game of 2018 FIFA World Cup for 6 to 12 hours a day in a comfortable office. Repetition is the most exhausting part of video game testing.

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