Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: Polish (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia

When you’re looking at job postings, keep in mind that many employers will still consider candidates even if they only have around 80% of the qualifications. Watch carefully for postings that say things like “2 years experience required, or equivalent experience” because often times college or independent game development is good enough to get an interview.
I might be biased, but this is my favorite on the list. Customer service is a skill that takes patience, dedication and perseverance, but it’s also a skill that can apply to almost every industry. Getting into this industry as a Customer Support Agent will give you an inside view of the companies you would like to start a career with – and with a company like 5CA, you’ll also have doors opening in other similar industries that you may find you enjoy more.
If the idea of moving to a different city (or even a different country) freaks you out, I urge you to keep an open mind. Many people move to a new town to start their first video game job, so there’s already a support network in place to help you out. The company that’s hiring you might even offer financial assistance to help you with your moving costs.
When a game is in development, there are many different bugs that are often easy to find. To write it up, you’d type your report into a specialized “issue tracker” software (for example, a program called Jira) that has form fields for each piece of information the game team wants to know about. Usually things like, what do you do to make the bug happen? What area of the game is it in? How “bad” is the bug on a scale of 1 to 5?
Im a 13 year old lad who loves to play on xbox mainly but i also like to play on playstations and other game consoles. I have nearly every game that is an 18 or a 15 including call of duty:modern warfare,call of duty:world at war, call of duty:modern warfare 2, call of duty:black ops, call of duty:modern warfare 3 and battlefield 3 and others. Wel really i know im a bit young probably to work but i used to work for game as a game tester and they had to fire me cos they got sumone older to test the games. but just lookin for a new job so if u want to message me my email address is alexcrawf10@hotmail.co.uk
Hi Nima, there aren’t really any jobs as “work from home” or online game testers. You should apply for normal, on-site testing jobs in your country. If there aren’t any game studios or game testing companies near you, then consider working for a non-game software company as a tester, because you may still get useful experience in software development.

If being laid off isn't bad enough, finding continued employment is also difficult. "Everyone tries to advance to positions that aren't available and won't get," says Phil. While this may also be true for other careers within the games industry, he believes this problem is compounded because testers are often hired through a staffing company and not internally. Many publishers won't offer a reference because of contractor policies. Most testers are not, technically, employees.
Hi Robert, you’re right that there’s a lot to learn to be in the video game industry – but that’s the same with any industry. The sooner you start learning, the sooner you’ll get good at it. 🙂 A college degree isn’t required, but a degree or at least a certificate would help a lot when you’re applying for jobs. If you don’t know where to start, then I’d suggest maybe taking a game-related certificate from a local college if possible – it will teach you the basics, and help you start making a portfolio. Best of luck!
When a game is in development, there are many different bugs that are often easy to find. To write it up, you’d type your report into a specialized “issue tracker” software (for example, a program called Jira) that has form fields for each piece of information the game team wants to know about. Usually things like, what do you do to make the bug happen? What area of the game is it in? How “bad” is the bug on a scale of 1 to 5?
In fact, many of the testers I’ve known over the years were working as testers so they could pay their way through college. They would work part time while they went to school, or even full time while they took classes in the evenings. (Many colleges have “evening degree” programs for working professionals.) Then, after they got their degrees, they got a new job in the game studio doing what they went to school for – like art, programming or design. And you can bet they also got a healthy pay increase to go with the promotion.

Take the ISTQB exam only through ASTQB. You can register to take the exam through a test center (they are located throughout the U.S. and in almost every country in the world). Be sure it is the ISTQB exam from ASTQB because employers check our official American list of ISTQB certified testers here on this site or by calling our office to confirm you are really certified!


Hi Nima, there aren’t really any jobs as “work from home” or online game testers. You should apply for normal, on-site testing jobs in your country. If there aren’t any game studios or game testing companies near you, then consider working for a non-game software company as a tester, because you may still get useful experience in software development.
I recently just asked on GameTesters.Net, about whether or not the testers get to keep the games or send them back, now i’ve been into gaming a lot, i’ve played many games ever since i was a kid, yes this goes way back from when i had Pokemon Stadium for the Nintendo 64, it was the very first system i ever had as a child, i don’t have it anymore, wish i did though, but anyways, this isn’t about a Gamer’s childhood or their very first game console, this is about bein paid, to be a Gamer, now i’d love to be paid just to play video games, it has been a dream of mine to be paid, just to play video games, i think that would be top notch, an awesome, plus it is something i enjoy doing, so if anyone can tell me how to land a job like this, just let me know in a reply.
I have been gaming sencie I was six, I have played many consoles. This includes the nes,snes,n64,GameCube,Wii,ps1,ps2,ps3,Xbox,and xbox360. I have played so many games I have lost count. I have always wanted to be a tester full time. I have many questions though. The first is do you need to be a highschool graduate to be accepted for a job as a tester. What are good companies like Square Enix to work for, and where are they located. What abilitys do companies require their testers to be capable of doing.
Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?

Hi Alyssa, my book does go into detail about how to write bug reports (thank you for buying a copy!). The answer to your question is “it depends” — sometimes a bunch of glitches are caused by a single bug in the code, but you probably wouldn’t know that unless you talked to a programmer about it. In your example, if you notice that you glitch through the floor in many places, you might write just one report that describes the bug and then gives a few examples of where it happened. That might be good enough to help a developer find the bug and fix it.
Hi Jackie, it’s interesting that you mention an interest in translation. Do you mean that you’re bilingual or multilingual? If so, you should investigate jobs as at companies that do “localization testing” because they employ translators and also testers. One company I’ve worked with before is Babel Media, so that could be a good place to start your search.
You can take pride in working for the employer of choice in the communities where we do business. You'll participate in a culture that treats all employees with respect, encourages their growth and development, and rewards excellence. Your thoughts and ideas are welcome here. We want to hear every fresh approach and new experience. If you find that appealing, then IGT could be the place for you.  We look forward to meeting you!
You make your own decisions. There are no unrealistic deadlines and nobody telling you how much to work. You get to decide how much you work, part-time, full-time or OVERTIME. Earn Up to $500-$3500 every month making a better than average income doing what you want, when you want. Get out of the rat race today! You get to decide because you have the freedom of working for yourself.
I am currently striving for a college degree in writing and programming, it would seem going with the game tester route would be the easiest in terms of climbing he hierarchy, and just going in with a college degree would be faster but I think experience beats that.so if I developed my own game or my own storyboard etc.would that help me in getting more better jobs such as in design or art

Nearly any game studio needs testers, and some of the big companies like Nintendo, EA, and Microsoft employ hundreds of game testers either directly or through temp agencies. Like any job, you can start by searching for job postings near your city using the video game job search tool. You can also search on popular tech-industry job sites like Monster.com, or on job aggregator sites like Indeed.com.


A video game company doesn't function like your typical workplace. Rather than working regular office hours throughout the year, the company goes into "crunch mode" as a game's release date approaches. Because release dates are inflexible – the company has to get the game out by Christmas, the television ad time has been purchased months in advance, and so on – if there's more work that needs to be done, everyone just has to work harder. Any video game tester can tell you that crunch time means long, long days, running on an intoxicating blend of caffeine, junk food and sleep deprivation.
It might surprise you to learn that strong writing and communication skills are essential for a good video game tester. The ability to write in a clear, brief, and effective manner will help you describe the glitches you find and how you found them. Your clear writing will give developers a clear path to addressing the issue and creating a fix. You don’t have to be a poetic, colorful author; you need to be a clear, concise, and detailed communicator.
Video game testers usually don't require any formal qualifications, although some knowledge of standard office software will be handy. This doesn't mean that some testers don't have BTECs or even degrees in computer games design, but these qualifications aren't necessary, although they can be helpful. Testers do need patience, discipline, organisation and persistence, because playing video games as a job isn't like playing video games on your own time.
Hi Akshat, congratulations on landing a job testing games! That’s very exciting. Now that you work at a game studio, you should try to learn as much as you can from the designers. Make friends with them, show an interest in their work, and maybe offer to help outside of work if any of them are making indie game projects on the side. You could also consider taking a game design course either online or at a local college. Also, work to become the best game tester you can, because if you do good work for the company then they’re more likely to keep you around and trust you to try you in other job roles. Again, congratulations, and good luck!

Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: German (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia less more
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