QA testers sign non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) with their employers and can be fired or even sued for divulging information. All the testers we contacted spoke to us on condition of anonymity. We have given them pseudonyms to protect their identities. We have checked each of their credentials. We asked for comments from a variety of games publishers, but have received zero responses.
I’ve been playing games since I was two, and have participated in beta-tests as long as I can remember. More specifically; I’ve participated in beta-tests nearly every new game release there’s been in the past 12 years. I’m 18, so it’s legal for me to work in most places, It’s just a matter of finding the company with an open or will be open position as a qa tester, that is lenient on distance to the physical work place.
Thanks you for your articles ,they helped me choose my career . I am truly indebted to you .So I wanna become a programmer and I think that I will start my career as a QA tester.im currently 16 and have played quite a few games .So can I start testing games online and what do I have to do for the basics . Also can you suggest me some programming languages essential for my game development career which I can learn right now . And which country ( particularly city ) would be best to go for my career , cause I was thinking of going to USA .Thanks
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Hi Brian, it’s great that you’re thinking of turning your love of games into a career. To get hired by a game studio, you need to have some skills that they’re looking for – usually either art, programming, design, or production. If you don’t have any of those skills then you might be able to get a job as a QA tester, but as you mentioned, you’d need to move to a city that has game studios.
Of course, this is a little bit of a stretch, considering that the number of video game jobs actually on the market is very minimal. With the right determination and effort, however, getting your foot into the industry is possible. Like many careers involving constantly-evolving knowledge and technology, there are always new opportunities: Game developer opportunities are expected to increase by about 11% annually over the next few years and the US Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates occupation growth of 6% from 2014 to 2024.
While the job may sound like a dream come true, Reuben says it's really not about getting paid to play games all day. "Imagine your favorite movie. Now take your favorite 30-second clip from that movie. Now watch that 30-second clip over and over again, 12 hours a day, every day for two months. When you've done that, tell me if what you've been doing is watching movies all day. I'm willing to bet you'll find that it's not quite the same thing...You get an area of the game, that's your area, and you test everything about that one area for months on end."
Jeez, some of the kids commenting here really can't type well. Either that or they're not good at English. You know it isn't all just fun and games you have to have some English skills because you have to write well detailed reports. You aren't just playing the game you have to analyze it and see where the bugs are or where are the rough patches and then report them to the company. I don't think that this kind of job is for 11 or 13 year olds. I think maybe you should explain that in your article above. This is coming from a 17 year old who has tested and now I make small games with a group of friends. (we're just learning the programs right now). Learning to program is a pain in the butt, but I think rather than small kids looking for jobs in video game testing, I think they should be encouraged to learn more about the games they love. You guys are to young. It bothers me just how many of you believe it is just getting paid to play when it isn't. Well those are just my two cents.

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Game testing does not typically require specialized education, so you could start applying for jobs now. Search online for game studios or testing companies that have open positions for “game tester” or “QA tester”, and apply online. There are numerous articles on this site on how to write your resume and apply for jobs, look under the “Blog” menu for more information. I wish you luck!
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There are many basic skills and abilities that you will need for a career as a video game tester, but probably the most important attribute is a foundational experience with video games. You need to understand the top genres of games, know what makes for a good video game, and grasp the essentials of game play. Knowing video games, however, is just a start.

Initially, the lead designer works with a small core team, defining the artistic approach for the game. The lead artist will supervise, if not undertake, the production of concept art which indicates the visual atmosphere and graphic design. They also research and test out different modeling, texturing, animation, rendering and lighting techniques and tools. The lead designer then manages the art and animation team (including outsourced staff), specifying what needs to be produced, ensuring deadlines and budgets and are met, and planning for any contingencies. Lead designers are employed by development studios, both independent and publisher-owned.
"At this point, the 'testing madness' started to hit. One of our testers started cursing out loud regarding waffles and their condescending desire to be like pancakes. One by one I sent each tester home as their sanity became too unstable to control. At one point, I realized I was the only one left and we still had at least 3 more hours of work remaining."

Initially, the lead designer works with a small core team, defining the artistic approach for the game. The lead artist will supervise, if not undertake, the production of concept art which indicates the visual atmosphere and graphic design. They also research and test out different modeling, texturing, animation, rendering and lighting techniques and tools. The lead designer then manages the art and animation team (including outsourced staff), specifying what needs to be produced, ensuring deadlines and budgets and are met, and planning for any contingencies. Lead designers are employed by development studios, both independent and publisher-owned.

Hi Kyler, most game testing jobs don’t require a degree unless they also require some computer programming skills. In high school, I’d recommend taking some computer classes, maybe a programming class, and technical writing. (Or whichever equivalents your school might offer.) Many people move away from their home town to get a job after school, it’s normal to move to a new city where there are more jobs in your field.
I am born to play games. I played first game when I was 4 as my dad bought me console but now I want to be only game tester but being honest no one supports me in this i play 20to18hrs a day online different games almost all new old game I want to apply for game tester job how can I do it IDC about how much they paid am happy with small amount because that way i can do what i love.
Hello! I’ve been playing video games for nearly all my life. I’ve put in so much time on gaming it’s crazy. But what do I do half the time I game? I find glitches. I’ve participated in private beta trials in nearly 6 PlayStation exclusive games and two other well-known games. I have also acquired the knowledge to use Microsoft Office programs proficiently, and I am studying game programming for the sake of learning how to better grasp the terminology and understanding of how a glitch is caused, and how it can be fixed. I’m only 17 and I am a junior in high school, however my dream is to become a QA Tester at Insomniac Games, the developers of Ratchet & Clank (which happens to be my favorite game franchise of all time). With the progress I’m making and these goals I have in mind, do you think they would accept me in the event I choose to apply for the job? Thanks for your input in advance. 🙂
I really like video games but I have a short attention span because I have ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder it doesn’t bother me when I am playing games only when I am doing other things like writing or reading I am an excellent reader but not a great writer I really want to be a video game tester I already try to find bugs and glitches in the games I play it helps to lengthen the game I have medicine that I take for it but it makes me a bit A-social I don’t get aggressive or any thing like that but I can be kinda shy would that be a problem.
Hello! I know this is from a few years ago, but I see you still answer peoples inquires, thanks so much for that! I only have one question, what are the reports on bugs like? Is there a format that you need to use, and do many of the reports look similar if the bug is similar? For instance, if you glitch through the floor in a building, but also in another town over of a game, would that be two different reports written the same, except for location? And how long are the reports typically? I’m actually about to buy your book in a few minutes so sorry if you address this within it, but thought I’d just get a jump start and ask here. Thank you!
Though the industry doesn't pay well for entry-level positions, what about more seasoned QA testers? Danny says, "I work with a guy who has spent the last eight years keeping his nose clean, never in fights with leadership, does whatever is asked of him, and is a freaking QA Ninja when it comes to PC testing. After eight years, he is still paid $14 an hour. I just think we're worth a whole heck of a lot more than $10 an hour." He believes that game developers/publishers should "offer some benefits like they do the rest of the company".
In games you play, look for glitches and errors. When you find them, document them thoroughly – when it happens, how it affect play, and if you can, list possible fixes for the problem. Then report these issues to the company that publishes the game. Your correspondence over this issue could help give you a contact person in that studio. And this could get your foot in the door of that company.
Hi Jacob, your first stop when looking for game studios in a given location should be GameDevMap.com. It’s a crowd-sourced list of studios. I can see that there are over a dozen developers and publishers there, but I don’t see any of the “giant” companies you mentioned – but that’s okay, because you don’t need to target the big, famous developers for your first job. Start wherever you can, build your experience, and then you can move elsewhere later on. Good luck!

i practically live and breathe video games. I can talk about them for hours. (ask my boyfriend.) when people tell me that they never got into video games it almost breaks my heart a little bit. but, I am going to college, and since I’d like to have my career based around video games whether it would be designing them, programming, or testing them, what kind of classes should I take? 3D animation? graphic design? does it all depend? I would love to make this into a career so I would like to be able to have some degrees and proper knowledge to make my resume more impressive, and eventually climb the ladder.

Learn how to become a game tester with my book, Land a Job as a Video Game Tester. You’ll learn the basics of game testing, and all the steps to apply, interview, and accept job offers. I worked hard to write a book that provides everything you need to know to get a job testing games, but if I missed anything then you should email me and I’ll answer any remaining questions you may have. read it
"At this point, the 'testing madness' started to hit. One of our testers started cursing out loud regarding waffles and their condescending desire to be like pancakes. One by one I sent each tester home as their sanity became too unstable to control. At one point, I realized I was the only one left and we still had at least 3 more hours of work remaining."
Besides a typical “game tester” job, there’s also a job that you may not have heard of yet called an “SDET” (pronounced “ESS-det”). That stands for “software design/development engineer in test.” It’s a cool job that’s basically a tester that writes computer code – code that tests the game in an automated way. So it’s like a testing job, but the salary is much higher since it requires programming skills. A programming degree or some programming classes would be really helpful for landing a job as an SDET.

The reality is, there are thousands of people who do have those cool jobs working in the video game industry. In fact, for those of you who were told by your parents to get off the couch and do something with your life, the reality is, playing video games can be a key to success in the gaming industry, says Marc Mencher, president of Game Recruiter, the premier search firm in the game industry.


While the job may sound like a dream come true, Reuben says it's really not about getting paid to play games all day. "Imagine your favorite movie. Now take your favorite 30-second clip from that movie. Now watch that 30-second clip over and over again, 12 hours a day, every day for two months. When you've done that, tell me if what you've been doing is watching movies all day. I'm willing to bet you'll find that it's not quite the same thing...You get an area of the game, that's your area, and you test everything about that one area for months on end."
Hi Kyler, most game testing jobs don’t require a degree unless they also require some computer programming skills. In high school, I’d recommend taking some computer classes, maybe a programming class, and technical writing. (Or whichever equivalents your school might offer.) Many people move away from their home town to get a job after school, it’s normal to move to a new city where there are more jobs in your field.
I am born to play games. I played first game when I was 4 as my dad bought me console but now I want to be only game tester but being honest no one supports me in this i play 20to18hrs a day online different games almost all new old game I want to apply for game tester job how can I do it IDC about how much they paid am happy with small amount because that way i can do what i love.
As our Platform/Build Engineer you'll be responsible for creating tools and systems to advance our in-development builds towards a polished, technical release across multiple platforms. You'll collaborate with a small team of developers to optimize efficiency of day-to-day tasks via tools and automation, while improving build performance and supporting QA.
Hi Sam, getting a job as a game tester may not be as far away as you think. Most testing jobs don’t require a college degree, you just need to know some of the basics of testing and you can apply for testing jobs. If you haven’t checked out my book on becoming a game tester, then I think that’s a great place to start because I wrote that book specifically for people like you. 🙂

Learn how to become a game tester with my book, Land a Job as a Video Game Tester. You’ll learn the basics of game testing, and all the steps to apply, interview, and accept job offers. I worked hard to write a book that provides everything you need to know to get a job testing games, but if I missed anything then you should email me and I’ll answer any remaining questions you may have. read it
Few people understand that not all jobs are highly technical. Video and computer games companies are in dire need of programmers, engineers, animators, and other “technically inclined” people – but they also need administrators, marketing and sales staff, recruiters, and more. Find all kinds of jobs from the top employers in the JobMonkey Job Center.
It depends on whether you’re working as a part-time, full-time, or temporary worker. If you’re hired as a full-time employee, you’ll normally start accruing paid vacation time right away and can take vacation at any time, as long as it’s ok with your manager. If you’re hired as a temporary employee, then you usually would not get any paid vacation. Note that temp workers can still take vacation from time to time, but you won’t be paid for the time you’re away from work.
Any travel that you may be required to do for work will be covered 100% by the company. They’ll pay for your flight and your hotel, and they’ll give you an allowance each day for food and other miscellaneous expenses. In general, business travel can be fun, and it’s a convenient way to see new cities. As a nice bonus, it also racks up your personal frequent flier miles.
Equally important is a growth mindset. You should see every day as an opportunity to improve yourself. We’re not looking for the feedback averse. You need conviction, passion, and horsepower to excel at Riot. We’re not in the rockstar business—we want smart, collaborative, and creative team players. It’s always about players. If it needs to be about you, we’re not the right spot.
hey, im 14 on the verge of being 15 and i extremly want a game testing job. ive been sending emails out to gaming sites and all i get back are links that give me no info or answers and no contact numbers. id realy appreciate it if i could get some help out with trying to get a job or contact anything realy that would help would be most appreciated thanks (email is jourdan.turner@gmail.com)
Technically, you need to be at least the minimum working age in your country, state, or province. But practically, most game companies won’t hire people as testers until they turn 18 years old. If you’re not old enough yet, you can start preparing for your future job by following some of the advice listed elsewhere in this article, and listen to my podcast about getting a job in games.
Location: SomersetWorking hours: Mon - Fri (9am - 6pm)[Negotiable]Duration: 2-3 monthsSalary: $8/hrResponsibilities:- Identify, isolate, and document bugs clearly and concisely in a bug database- Run test suites, verify fixes, spot grammar and language mistakes in specified language - Follow the documented processes at all stages of the testing process- Verify that bugs have been fixed and impleme ...
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