The Community Manager’s responsibilities support the organization’s established core programs, including events and new initiatives. The role also includes social listening and analytics to stay informed about industry trends and opportunities and direct engagement with key constituencies, including game developers and cause-oriented organizations.

Hi Carlos, in your question, you mention several different game jobs: writer, programmer, tester, design, and art. So the first thing I’d recommend is to get some clarity on which game job you want to do. If you can identify what it is you want to do, then the path will be clearer. If you’re currently going for a degree in writing or programming, then try to do some game-related projects while you’re in school, to start building your portfolio. Then you’ll be able to apply for jobs directly after college.
Thanks you for your articles ,they helped me choose my career . I am truly indebted to you .So I wanna become a programmer and I think that I will start my career as a QA tester.im currently 16 and have played quite a few games .So can I start testing games online and what do I have to do for the basics . Also can you suggest me some programming languages essential for my game development career which I can learn right now . And which country ( particularly city ) would be best to go for my career , cause I was thinking of going to USA .Thanks

Hi Robert, you’re right that there’s a lot to learn to be in the video game industry – but that’s the same with any industry. The sooner you start learning, the sooner you’ll get good at it. 🙂 A college degree isn’t required, but a degree or at least a certificate would help a lot when you’re applying for jobs. If you don’t know where to start, then I’d suggest maybe taking a game-related certificate from a local college if possible – it will teach you the basics, and help you start making a portfolio. Best of luck!
Equally important is a growth mindset. You should see every day as an opportunity to improve yourself. We’re not looking for the feedback averse. You need conviction, passion, and horsepower to excel at Riot. We’re not in the rockstar business—we want smart, collaborative, and creative team players. It’s always about players. If it needs to be about you, we’re not the right spot.
Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?
Hi, I’m in my first semester in college now and I was thinking about going into gaming since I’ve been playing games for a long time since I can remember. I am thinking about changing my major into something like programming, but I never took a class in high school that was computer oriented and such. I was wondering do you think it would be a good idea to go ahead and change my major or not since I don’t really know about programming?
are there any places for these jobs in Canada, and for age complies would 17 work. I can honestly say I’ve played video games since I was around 3-4 since then I slowly went up in gaming. now I’m more into battlefield and call of duty or really any shooters. I have found bugs on my own and done a lot of the things you said that you would have to do as a game tester like writing a report, do you have to be good with code and things like that to make a job?.

When you’re looking at job postings, keep in mind that many employers will still consider candidates even if they only have around 80% of the qualifications. Watch carefully for postings that say things like “2 years experience required, or equivalent experience” because often times college or independent game development is good enough to get an interview.
Although requirements vary, you may need or benefit from technical training or an undergraduate degree in a technical field. Potential degree programs may include computer science, software development, or graphic design. Sometimes employers want video game testers with backgrounds in technology because they need employees who can do more than just test games. For instance, they may need workers to perform programming tasks or provide customer support. Other employers prefer testers who are tech-savvy because they want testers who can communicate problems to game developers and point out specific technical issues.
Hi, there, my name is Robert. I’m a gamer that loves JRPGs, and would love to be in this business, but I feel you need to know rocket-science do be in this industry. Am I wrong? I also have no college degree. Is a game tester the best way to start, or trying to a make phone game, if I want to be a game designer? Or should I go to a college? I’m lost.
Before you change your major, I think you should try taking an online programming class to see if you like programming. (CodeSchool has some great classes, and they’re inexpensive – maybe try their JavaScript classes.) If you find out that programming is interesting for you once you spend a few hours learning it, then you might consider changing your major.
Interested in turning your love of video games into a career? This course will introduce you to the concepts and skills required to make it in the modern game industry—whether you want to build and finance your own game or land a job at a triple-A studio, with an indie team, or in mobile gaming. Learn about the history of video games, the structure of a typical game studio, the distribution paths for different types of games, marketing trends, the various roles (both artistic and technical), and the skills you need for each job. Christian Bradley provides practical, real-world advice about the game industry, and tips for getting your foot in the door. Plus, explore the courses and learning paths we offer to help get you started.
Hi Jason, my name is Myra and my question to you is. Do any game companies hire GT’s for specific software only? I specialize in slot apps and I feel my input towards a game company’s slot app could really benefit their app’s success and could take their app to another level. Is there anyone looking for people like that or are GT’s expected to be equipped with multiple games skills?
I read all of your post and since I've worked for Nexon, I know what is meaning working as a Quality Assurance in a serious place. It's not just playing the game... Sometimes it could be very tiring, especially when you are forced to test a game that you don't like for over 1 or more years. Otherwise, I wish to you all a huge luck for your future experience as a Game Tester/QA.
Hey. I’ve been gaming most of my life and am meeting my ends as a teenager. im 17 almost 18 and am a senior in high school. For my English 4 class im required to ask a few questions that hopefully you can answer? I Love most games, and I always replay levels on games over and over, simply to see if I can do weird things anyways, so I thought maybe starting as a beta tester and working towards a game designer would be really nice. Id rather work from home though, as im limited on transport. any suggestions?
Location: SomersetWorking hours: Mon - Fri (9am - 6pm)[Negotiable]Duration: 2-3 monthsSalary: $8/hrResponsibilities:- Identify, isolate, and document bugs clearly and concisely in a bug database- Run test suites, verify fixes, spot grammar and language mistakes in specified language - Follow the documented processes at all stages of the testing process- Verify that bugs have been fixed and impleme ...

Hi Jason, I seem to find myself in a predicament. Currently I am moving on to my senior year at Penn State and I need a new major. I was pursuing Computer Engineering, but programming and I do not get along very well (Once you go past “if” statements I’m Lost). So my first question is, what majors are good for entering the game industry, that don’t involve programming. My next question is about finding an entry-level position that I can learn on the job. I used your job search tool that you provided and most jobs seemed to require previous experience, any suggestions there?

Hi Nima, there aren’t really any jobs as “work from home” or online game testers. You should apply for normal, on-site testing jobs in your country. If there aren’t any game studios or game testing companies near you, then consider working for a non-game software company as a tester, because you may still get useful experience in software development.

Hi, there, my name is Robert. I’m a gamer that loves JRPGs, and would love to be in this business, but I feel you need to know rocket-science do be in this industry. Am I wrong? I also have no college degree. Is a game tester the best way to start, or trying to a make phone game, if I want to be a game designer? Or should I go to a college? I’m lost.

I’m assuming this website is American-based (because of the mention of “provinces”), and I also assume people living in the UK or Australia won’t necessarily be able to use the advanced search; especially if you’re like me, and live in the middle of nowhere, essentially. But does the advanced search apply to worldwide users, or just to American users, or is it possible to select your country with this? I only found this website recently, so I haven’t tested it out, but if this isn’t the case, I hope you consider adding a selection of your home country to users, so they too can search for jobs.
I am interested in becoming a game tester. I am 21 years old and have done some college (not towards this profession) however, I have no desire to finish. I know you don’t need a college degree but, it is preferred. I don’t have a lot of knowledge when it comes to game design, programming, etc. and don’t mind taking a couple of classes to learn more about it because gaming is my passion. Are taking classes about game design and programming ok? Is there any other specific classes I’m supposed to take? Answering these questions would be greatly appreciated. I saw above from the other comments that you reply rather quickly which gave me the courage to right this. 🙂
Although requirements vary, you may need or benefit from technical training or an undergraduate degree in a technical field. Potential degree programs may include computer science, software development, or graphic design. Sometimes employers want video game testers with backgrounds in technology because they need employees who can do more than just test games. For instance, they may need workers to perform programming tasks or provide customer support. Other employers prefer testers who are tech-savvy because they want testers who can communicate problems to game developers and point out specific technical issues.

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Hi I just wanted to say I know gaming world is not easy but work job isnt I love playing game I love writing I love find patches in every game I play and I usually not that easy… but I tend to have fun with it im not going to say im the best or anything like that but im pretty good at what I do im barely 18 and I love to work . Ive always wanted to a game taster but never really understood how to do so … but I have a few questions on how everything works but I am a hard worker and fun to know and talk to … it hard to work away from home because im a single father of a one year old and I’d to work from home so I could raise him and work at the same time … what would be a good way for me to get into the gaming industry?
Greetings! I’m an English teacher and I’m from Venezuela. My question is, could I get a job as a game tester from my country? I ask you this because, part of my job in the Institute that I’m working on, is to interview future students. I recently interviewed a guy that told me he was working as a game tester along with 4 more people. Since gaming is my passion and I’ve been a beta tester for 20 years, I’ve always dreamed of becoming a real tester but didn’t know that I could do it from here. Could I work as a tester from my country? Thanks a lot!
Hello I am 12 years old and play video games non stop on weekends , during the day after school , and especially now during the summer since my mom is a house wife and I never bother making plans with my friends. I play on all game consoles and even when I do travel I always bring two game consoles along with all the games I have for each console. I would take my job very seriously .I am in the magnent program at my school and i take their advanced computer class which is required . My parents are the ones who said if I could find a job they would let me. I also want to have this job because I will not lie about my opinion. I really want money to give mygrandfather who is in the hospital . email me at carasinkler@aol.com

If the idea of moving to a different city (or even a different country) freaks you out, I urge you to keep an open mind. Many people move to a new town to start their first video game job, so there’s already a support network in place to help you out. The company that’s hiring you might even offer financial assistance to help you with your moving costs.
ItemForge MMO Shop is looking for levelers and boosters. I will explain and provide everything you need to get started (guide, info, accounts) but it is up to you to learn basics (game mechanics). The more games you learn, the more jobs you will be eligible to get so I suggest learning minimum two. You should know at least one of them quite well already, otherwise you will need to learn it, which is unpaid during the first 6 months of cooperation. Longterm you are expected to improve your skills and knowledge in your free time (staying up to date with patches), but we will pay for your training when a new game is added to the shop. If you prove to be efficient and reliable, it will become a full time job. Duration: - It is a LONG-TERM project. (Note: Don't bother if expect to work 1 day/1 week/1 month) - It is a 5+ days a week job Requirements: - Long term (this job is for years - the game may change, but the players remain the same!) - Responsible & reliable - Ability to read (games change all the time, you need to stay up to date) - STABLE internet + PC able to handle the newest MMO games Offer below is for basic services (require only minimal game knowledge and average skills). If you are a very skilled gamer and can supply premium (top rating) boosts without my help (know-how and accounts) then please send me a list + price of services you can provide (any game, not just the ones we support right now). Always looking for: BOOSTER ($16-24 / day - about $450 a month) for boosting/multiboxing, who is online a lot (minimum 8h+ almost every day) to use 3rd party programs like Multiboxer, you should be tech savy (good at troubleshooting software etc.) You will be doing on demand live boosting (when customer is playing) or perform multibox leveling (which has a flexible schedule). You should have above average skills, good enough game knowledge and at least communicative English. POWER LEVELER ($8-12 / Day - about $250 a month) who can stream for menial jobs like leveling or grinding but also skilled quick jobs (typically x hours). You need a conversational English, above average skills/knowledge and should be online almost every day. You can outsource this job to your non-English speaking friends and earn on being a middle man but you still need a manager who will train them and coordinate the jobs. We also cooperate with teams (e.g. in gaming centers) who can provide many players and/or 24/7 leveling on the same PC (streaming isn't required if gamers are supervised). Power Leveling is all about manually playing online games on customer's account and achieving specific goals within set deadline. Playing manually means 100% by hand, you are not allowed (without my explicit case by case permission) to use or install anything beside the official game client. VPN Tunnel will be provided for you, you can't power level without it. Although many jobs allow you to have a flexible schedule, high availability is desired because sometimes you will have to be able to play during scheduled events like in the party, during specific fixed daily schedule. Only minimal game mechanics knowledge is required to start receiving jobs (100-200h /played). All jobs require you to be online but amount of attention needed varies from job to job, some only require you to play 10% of the time (leecher), others 100% (grind). Rate is calculated for average skill level (not a clicker or a keyboard turner). If you are very efficient and creative, you can complete some (but not all) of the jobs a few times faster or do 2-3 jobs at the same time. This means double or even triple hourly rate but it is very random so you need to be ok with the basic rate, even during jobs that take weeks to complete. Other than that, there is no advancement opportunity, your base rate will never increase (though you may still advance to a Booster). You are expected to play 8h a day, almost every day after you take the job (until you complete it). You will be paid a fixed price for average delivery time (deadlines are very fair), whenever you complete it in 50% or 150% of the time, you will still be paid the same amount (this way efficiency is encouraged). Need all of the following information in your offer (failing to provide a clear answer to any of them will most likely cause your application to be auto-declined): 1. Which position are you applying for, why that one? What kind of tasks do you think you will do? 2. Daily/Weekly availability (how many hours?) 3. Can you play without ping issues on servers located in Europe and America? (try D3 trial and make some levels on BOTH game modes) 4. Preferred long-term daily price (don't waste time asking for more than is offered) 5. PC/Internet specifications (can you stream?) 6. MMO accomplishments and/or gaming experience (only list impressive things that take thousands of hours) 7. Experience in online gaming services industry 8. English level 9. Cover letter (sell yourself!) less more
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