started off as a picker then quickly made my way to fill Active/stocker which is filling empty slots. or replenish product in which need's to be picked and after that was done help assist in picking or packing. then moved replenishment driver/order picker and our team was in charge of supply all stock. to the pickers and fill Activator's also assisting - more... in special projects directed by the managers or supervisor. I was able to obtain perfect attendance award twice for being at work one hour prior to scheduled time.the work place was amazing the different culture and new people and different poin ... - less
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Any travel that you may be required to do for work will be covered 100% by the company. They’ll pay for your flight and your hotel, and they’ll give you an allowance each day for food and other miscellaneous expenses. In general, business travel can be fun, and it’s a convenient way to see new cities. As a nice bonus, it also racks up your personal frequent flier miles.

When you’re looking at job postings, keep in mind that many employers will still consider candidates even if they only have around 80% of the qualifications. Watch carefully for postings that say things like “2 years experience required, or equivalent experience” because often times college or independent game development is good enough to get an interview.
Hi I just wanted to say I know gaming world is not easy but work job isnt I love playing game I love writing I love find patches in every game I play and I usually not that easy… but I tend to have fun with it im not going to say im the best or anything like that but im pretty good at what I do im barely 18 and I love to work . Ive always wanted to a game taster but never really understood how to do so … but I have a few questions on how everything works but I am a hard worker and fun to know and talk to … it hard to work away from home because im a single father of a one year old and I’d to work from home so I could raise him and work at the same time … what would be a good way for me to get into the gaming industry?
Hi.I am a 12th student from India and have taken the commerce stream . Sir i would like to become a Qa tester,but i dont know what to do after 12 like what course should i go for for acheiving my ambition .I am willing to go to any place and study to achive my dream . Sir please help to achieve my dream and help me to reach a higher position in my life with a good salary.

Of course, this is a little bit of a stretch, considering that the number of video game jobs actually on the market is very minimal. With the right determination and effort, however, getting your foot into the industry is possible. Like many careers involving constantly-evolving knowledge and technology, there are always new opportunities: Game developer opportunities are expected to increase by about 11% annually over the next few years and the US Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates occupation growth of 6% from 2014 to 2024.

While the idea of working from home might seem appealing, most people actually prefer working in an office. You’ll learn much faster when you’re around other, more experienced testers. And it’s also a great way to build a community, and make a group of tester friends who will help each other out later on in your careers. Working from home can be extremely lonely, and people who work from home often don’t advance their careers as often as people who work in the office.
According to the Gamasutra Salary Survey of 2014, the online publication for Game Developer Magazine, the average salary for testers is about $54,833 annually. The same study found that testers with over three years of experience average roughly $48,426 a year. If you work for over six years, you can expect to reach an average of $62,885 a year, and those with a master’s degree earned on average $65,000.
I’ve been playing games for the majority of my life. Even so much that it interfered with my classes to the point of me just getting a G.E.D. Needless to say I dont have much schooling but I tend to look for bugs in games almost everyday. Recently I began editing and modding games using C+ programming and have a bit of experience with it. Would it still be possible for me to be a tester or would I need to go back to school.
Hi Alyssa, my book does go into detail about how to write bug reports (thank you for buying a copy!). The answer to your question is “it depends” — sometimes a bunch of glitches are caused by a single bug in the code, but you probably wouldn’t know that unless you talked to a programmer about it. In your example, if you notice that you glitch through the floor in many places, you might write just one report that describes the bug and then gives a few examples of where it happened. That might be good enough to help a developer find the bug and fix it.
Hi, I’m in my first semester in college now and I was thinking about going into gaming since I’ve been playing games for a long time since I can remember. I am thinking about changing my major into something like programming, but I never took a class in high school that was computer oriented and such. I was wondering do you think it would be a good idea to go ahead and change my major or not since I don’t really know about programming?
I read all of your post and since I've worked for Nexon, I know what is meaning working as a Quality Assurance in a serious place. It's not just playing the game... Sometimes it could be very tiring, especially when you are forced to test a game that you don't like for over 1 or more years. Otherwise, I wish to you all a huge luck for your future experience as a Game Tester/QA.
Hello my name is Cyril and i am interested in testing video games. My parents say its alright if i can find a job. I am aware of the difficulties and obstacles of testing video games. But i would like to know were i can get that kind of a job. It would really mean alot to me because it would be nice to have some cash and i would love to have the chance to develop and design video games. Thanks and God Bless.
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I’m afraid I can’t help with financial advice. But as far as your game design goals, I think it will be hard to start a career in games in Alaska, because there aren’t any game studios up there that I know of. The closest US city with a strong game industry would be Seattle, so one strategy might be to move to Seattle and get a non-game job while you pursue a video game design certificate or degree. But you’d want to be sure that your health and finances are in order before making such a move. Be smart about it.
While the idea of working from home might seem appealing, most people actually prefer working in an office. You’ll learn much faster when you’re around other, more experienced testers. And it’s also a great way to build a community, and make a group of tester friends who will help each other out later on in your careers. Working from home can be extremely lonely, and people who work from home often don’t advance their careers as often as people who work in the office.

In fact, many of the testers I’ve known over the years were working as testers so they could pay their way through college. They would work part time while they went to school, or even full time while they took classes in the evenings. (Many colleges have “evening degree” programs for working professionals.) Then, after they got their degrees, they got a new job in the game studio doing what they went to school for – like art, programming or design. And you can bet they also got a healthy pay increase to go with the promotion.

Looking for a PC gamer to help me set up the ultimate gaming PC for my son. I own a medical software company but none of my developers are into gaming. I I want to customize the PC in a number of ways to make it fun and easy to use for my son. He is only 7 and this is his first gaming PC so I need some help installing games, creating shortcuts, installing the GTAV patch that removes violence, etc. I also want recommendation on good games for a kid his age. I also want assistance control some of the content on the computer to limit access to some content on Youtube and the web in general. I will provide you access to the PC via TeamViewer and you will be able to customize remotely. less more
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