Hi I just wanted to say I know gaming world is not easy but work job isnt I love playing game I love writing I love find patches in every game I play and I usually not that easy… but I tend to have fun with it im not going to say im the best or anything like that but im pretty good at what I do im barely 18 and I love to work . Ive always wanted to a game taster but never really understood how to do so … but I have a few questions on how everything works but I am a hard worker and fun to know and talk to … it hard to work away from home because im a single father of a one year old and I’d to work from home so I could raise him and work at the same time … what would be a good way for me to get into the gaming industry?


Hi Evan, thanks for the questions. First of all, playtesting isn’t a full-time job, you might be thinking about the QA Tester job that’s described in this article. That is a full-time job, and most companies do not require a degree to do that job. Also, there are dozens (hundreds?) of game studios in the US, so I recommend you don’t limit yourself as to which one you’d work for when you first start out — you’ll have a lot to learn, and you can learn at most any game company.
T. Thomas is a General Manager for a top Game Industry Game Developer saying “We like to hire the best people for our QA Team. This means we will hire some that proves to have skills in testing video games. When we look at all the employment applications for Game Testing, those who have qualified skills are the ones who will get hired. We were curious about http://get-paid-to-play-games.milehightopsites.com learning from a pro game tester. Proven technical learning skills are proven here to learn about game testing. This is not endorsement of the website. However, it speaks volumes about game testing! We feel anyone who get these skills will be game testing video games.“
When you’re looking at job postings, keep in mind that many employers will still consider candidates even if they only have around 80% of the qualifications. Watch carefully for postings that say things like “2 years experience required, or equivalent experience” because often times college or independent game development is good enough to get an interview.
Are you passionate about gaming? Do you have excellent programming skills? Do you like being creative and working with the best developers, artists, and game designers from the industry? Do you enjoy solving technical challenges in mobile gaming and bringing mobile games to the next level? Then read on because you might just be the developer we're looking for.
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: Polish (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia less more

I started this website because there’s very little information out there about how video game companies work on the inside, or how to get started in the industry. I’ve spent literally hundreds of hours, of my own personal time, to write dozens of articles to give you insight into making games as a career. And here they all are, all of them, for free. FOR FREE!


Or, to put it in other terms, rather than sitting around playing games all day, you'll be sitting around playing the same part of a game over and over. And not the climactic boss fight, either – at least, not necessarily. You're just as likely to be assigned to make sure that the different sections of the pause menu work in all different areas of the game.


Hello I am 12 years old and play video games non stop on weekends , during the day after school , and especially now during the summer since my mom is a house wife and I never bother making plans with my friends. I play on all game consoles and even when I do travel I always bring two game consoles along with all the games I have for each console. I would take my job very seriously .I am in the magnent program at my school and i take their advanced computer class which is required . My parents are the ones who said if I could find a job they would let me. I also want to have this job because I will not lie about my opinion. I really want money to give mygrandfather who is in the hospital . email me at carasinkler@aol.com
Hi Samin, your comment made me chuckle! If you could get paid to play games, then everybody would do that for sure. The fact is that game testing is a lot of work, and sometimes it’s not even very fun. You don’t get to just play the game, you have to search for bugs and write a report for each bug you find. Sometimes you could write 20 or more reports each day. Then when the dev team fixes the bug, you have to go into the game to make sure it’s really fixed, which can take a while.
Hi jason, my name is james, i’m 15 and i’ve been working with a company for about a month now, i love programming and we’re working on a hands free social media app called fallound. I really don’t know what i’m gonna do in college but i want to be part of a major position in a gaming company like ubisoft or rockstars for example, can you tell me what major should i do in college, thanks!
Video game testers usually don't require any formal qualifications, although some knowledge of standard office software will be handy. This doesn't mean that some testers don't have BTECs or even degrees in computer games design, but these qualifications aren't necessary, although they can be helpful. Testers do need patience, discipline, organisation and persistence, because playing video games as a job isn't like playing video games on your own time.
Funcom is looking to hire not 1 but 2 talented External Producers to handle the management of the company’s publishing projects. Opportunity locations: Raleigh, NC USA & Oslo, Norway The role’s responsibilities include the continuous communication with developers, the management of work pipelines, project finances, team management, internal and external resource management and the successful timely launch of the projects/titles.
hi Mr. Jason my Name is Dalton I have been currently working as a student in the Cascades jobcorps in Sedro Woolley, but frankly I’m from Marysville WA, I wanted to ask you if a game tester/QA tester gets any kind of Social life while trying to maintain his current life, I have been told from one person that it’s life crushing and from another it’s a can-do Career, but I wanted to know from your point of view
Make sure to keep up-to-date on video game trends. For example, by reading industry magazines or blogs, you can find out when new games will be released and which games are preferred by certain demographics. Trade magazines and blog sites may also offer insider information about game developer companies, which may prove to be useful knowledge when you try to find open video game tester positions.
Hi Jason, my name is Myra and my question to you is. Do any game companies hire GT’s for specific software only? I specialize in slot apps and I feel my input towards a game company’s slot app could really benefit their app’s success and could take their app to another level. Is there anyone looking for people like that or are GT’s expected to be equipped with multiple games skills?

As our Platform/Build Engineer you'll be responsible for creating tools and systems to advance our in-development builds towards a polished, technical release across multiple platforms. You'll collaborate with a small team of developers to optimize efficiency of day-to-day tasks via tools and automation, while improving build performance and supporting QA.
On a typical day, a tester will receive an assignment telling him or her to play through a certain part of the game in a certain way in order to identify any bugs. When a bug appears, the tester will fill out a report and submit it; he or she may be asked to replicate it several times. Once – or if – the developers believe they've fixed the bug, the tester may then repeat the process to make sure it's no longer there. Some bugs may be "waived," meaning that they remain in the final game.
very helpful article. i personally love breaking games and finding bugs. i just love to find those bugs that the developers/programmers didnt think of being possible or consider happening. just to find one and say “this is a game breaking bug, here is a way you could fix it” makes me happy because it might help keep another player from experiencing that bug and ruining there experience of the game. the mere fact that i sit playing games the first time through enjoying them and then going back and trying to break them for fun kind of qualifies me or places me in the area for QA game tester already but that doesnt mean much as i cant find anywhere to apply for such a job. i know minor programming and can give details on how to fix bugs in a way a programmer might understand better than the regular person testing the game without the knowledge. it’s just saddening for me that i have been searching for about 3 years now for somewhere to apply for this type of job. i truly have a passion for it, even though it’s considered a tedious job at times, i still love it.
I’m afraid I can’t help with financial advice. But as far as your game design goals, I think it will be hard to start a career in games in Alaska, because there aren’t any game studios up there that I know of. The closest US city with a strong game industry would be Seattle, so one strategy might be to move to Seattle and get a non-game job while you pursue a video game design certificate or degree. But you’d want to be sure that your health and finances are in order before making such a move. Be smart about it.
Testing videos games is one of the most vital parts of the game development process. Game developers need people like you to test their games to make sure there are no glitches or problems with the gameplay, music, graphics and general workings of the game. These companies are investing millions in there games and can not afford to release a poor game. So don't "unvalue" your importance and worth as a game tester.
CPU: Intel Core i3-3210 3.2 GHz / AMD A8-7600 APU 3.1 GHz or equivalentRAM: 4 GBOS: Windows 7 and upVIDEO CARD: Integrated: Intel HD Graphics 4000 (Ivy Bridge) or AMD Radeon R5 series (Kaveri line) with OpenGL 4.41Discrete: Nvidia GeForce 400 Series or AMD Radeon HD 7000 series with OpenGL 4.4FREE DISK SPACE: At least 1 GB for Game Core and Other Files
Hello! I’ve been playing video games for nearly all my life. I’ve put in so much time on gaming it’s crazy. But what do I do half the time I game? I find glitches. I’ve participated in private beta trials in nearly 6 PlayStation exclusive games and two other well-known games. I have also acquired the knowledge to use Microsoft Office programs proficiently, and I am studying game programming for the sake of learning how to better grasp the terminology and understanding of how a glitch is caused, and how it can be fixed. I’m only 17 and I am a junior in high school, however my dream is to become a QA Tester at Insomniac Games, the developers of Ratchet & Clank (which happens to be my favorite game franchise of all time). With the progress I’m making and these goals I have in mind, do you think they would accept me in the event I choose to apply for the job? Thanks for your input in advance. 🙂
Testers can be paid hourly or they can be on an annual salary. Either way, the pay rate can vary a lot — it’s based on factors such as which game company you’re working for, what geographical location the studio is located within, and how many years of experience you have as a game tester or a game testing lead. Read more about the specific salary numbers per job and years of experience in my article about video game tester salary. I update it with the latest pay figures every year.
The hardest part of this job is that most video game testers don’t get to pick the game they are testing. If you are a diehard Guitar Hero fan, it may be challenging to test for controller problems in the newest Hannah Montana game. Every tester must remember that video game testing is a job and even after long hours and sore eyes, you are still getting paid to play video games. And sometimes you live the dream, when you are paid for “testing” Mario Kart or beating Ninja Gaiden.
Hi Tim, if you’re getting an Associates in Software Development then that’s a good ground to start out on. Here’s my advice: Build a very small game project while you’re in school, to use as a portfolio piece when you start looking for jobs. Then once you graduate, you can apply to jobs in other cities – just be prepared to move to a new city if you get a job offer. I wish you luck!
Hey! My name is Gloria and I'm 16. I am not exactly interested in video game beta testing. I'm more interested in like IMVU or Second life; Virtual worlds and such. I'm also interested in different types of software like music production, videography, photography and graphic design as well as art studio software and ect. I was wondering if you guys could help. I have been looking everywhere!
I have been playing games on the pc all the way back to the commodore 360. and have been playing all of my life. I am now 44 years old I have 6 classes before I graduate with my BS/IT/WD, The whole reason I went back to school was because I like to game and I wanted to get a job as a gamer (tester) I don’t want to get into the development side or the design side I just want to play games and do bug reports. Every site I have looked at all they want to do is sell me a book on how to be a tester. I don’t have the $$ to buy a book or a “plan” any tips on where I might go from here?
Here, every day is different. Do you prefer a behind-the-scenes role? One at the front and center of the action? Or something in between? At Penn National Gaming, there’s a “fit” for just about anyone.  What began in the seventies as a single horseracing venue has grown to become one of the nation’s largest gaming companies. Penn National Gaming has properties in 18 states as well as Ontario, Canada. But as big as we are, we still feel like family. With company-wide managerial support, resources, and training, our employees can count on a positive experience no matter where they choose to work. What makes you happy? Imagine giving your all to a company and watching that same commitment come right back to you.
GameStop's rapidly growing, multiple-brand business model provides talented people with many ways to develop and grow their career. We are committed to the ongoing talent development of all GameStop associates and offer unique learning opportunities through our proprietary LevelUp Interactive, LevelUp Leadership, and high-potential talent development programs.
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