Hey. I’ve been gaming most of my life and am meeting my ends as a teenager. im 17 almost 18 and am a senior in high school. For my English 4 class im required to ask a few questions that hopefully you can answer? I Love most games, and I always replay levels on games over and over, simply to see if I can do weird things anyways, so I thought maybe starting as a beta tester and working towards a game designer would be really nice. Id rather work from home though, as im limited on transport. any suggestions?
Hi Jason, I seem to find myself in a predicament. Currently I am moving on to my senior year at Penn State and I need a new major. I was pursuing Computer Engineering, but programming and I do not get along very well (Once you go past “if” statements I’m Lost). So my first question is, what majors are good for entering the game industry, that don’t involve programming. My next question is about finding an entry-level position that I can learn on the job. I used your job search tool that you provided and most jobs seemed to require previous experience, any suggestions there?

Sales/Game Advisors — Sales associates earn starting pay around $8.00 per hour. Also called game advisors, employees provide customers with information on games and products. Other tasks include greeting patrons, completing sales, and keeping stores clean and organized. Read the GameStop game advisor job description to learn about entry-level employment opportunities with the retail chain.

When a game is in development, there are many different bugs that are often easy to find. To write it up, you’d type your report into a specialized “issue tracker” software (for example, a program called Jira) that has form fields for each piece of information the game team wants to know about. Usually things like, what do you do to make the bug happen? What area of the game is it in? How “bad” is the bug on a scale of 1 to 5?

Although requirements vary, you may need or benefit from technical training or an undergraduate degree in a technical field. Potential degree programs may include computer science, software development, or graphic design. Sometimes employers want video game testers with backgrounds in technology because they need employees who can do more than just test games. For instance, they may need workers to perform programming tasks or provide customer support. Other employers prefer testers who are tech-savvy because they want testers who can communicate problems to game developers and point out specific technical issues.

Though the industry doesn't pay well for entry-level positions, what about more seasoned QA testers? Danny says, "I work with a guy who has spent the last eight years keeping his nose clean, never in fights with leadership, does whatever is asked of him, and is a freaking QA Ninja when it comes to PC testing. After eight years, he is still paid $14 an hour. I just think we're worth a whole heck of a lot more than $10 an hour." He believes that game developers/publishers should "offer some benefits like they do the rest of the company".
"At this point, the 'testing madness' started to hit. One of our testers started cursing out loud regarding waffles and their condescending desire to be like pancakes. One by one I sent each tester home as their sanity became too unstable to control. At one point, I realized I was the only one left and we still had at least 3 more hours of work remaining."
GameStop's rapidly growing, multiple-brand business model provides talented people with many ways to develop and grow their career. We are committed to the ongoing talent development of all GameStop associates and offer unique learning opportunities through our proprietary LevelUp Interactive, LevelUp Leadership, and high-potential talent development programs.
Testing videos games is one of the most vital parts of the game development process. Game developers need people like you to test their games to make sure there are no glitches or problems with the gameplay, music, graphics and general workings of the game. These companies are investing millions in there games and can not afford to release a poor game. So don't "unvalue" your importance and worth as a game tester.
Game testing jobs generally don’t require advanced degrees. Since you’re going for post-secondary degrees, then it might be more applicable for you to work toward a job as a video game programmer, rather than a tester. In either case, start by looking up job postings for game studios near your home to see what requirements they list, and then start working toward those requirements. There are a number of large game studios with a presence in India such as Ubisoft, EA, Microsoft and more.
During testing, the video game tester’s trained eye looks for problems that gamers will face. After a tester identifies a glitch, the problem must be written up and submitted to game designers to fix. This process can be challenging and it may mean replaying the same game of 2018 FIFA World Cup for 6 to 12 hours a day in a comfortable office. Repetition is the most exhausting part of video game testing.
The overall job outlook for Video Game Designer careers has been negative since 2004. Vacancies for this career have decreased by 32.33 percent nationwide in that time, with an average decline of 5.39 percent per year. Demand for Video Game Designers is expected to go up, with an expected 7,940 new jobs filled by 2018. This represents an annual increase of 11.59 percent over the next few years.
A few companies offer college internships most do not, says Mencher. So, you must “create’ your own experience through game development projects, volunteering to be part of a MOD group or using the development tools that most game companies release with the games themselves. Want to work for Epic Games or a Game Developer using the Unreal engine? Go purchase the last game created with Unreal – and have fun using the tools provided.

Compounding the physical and mental stresses that QA testers endure was the complete lack of job security. "During training, they told us it's not a matter of 'if' you'll be laid-off but 'when'," says Keith. "They flat-out tell you that what makes a good employee is the number of bugs you find and it is this number that will determine if you are kept on or not." This methodology, however, did not accurately take into account the quality of dedication that went into a project. "Here I was recreating and logging how to get stuck in the tail of a helicopter. I would have other testers comment on how much they liked my bugs, because I was one of those guys who would be able to reproduce those bugs that stumped everyone else, but when it came to the end of the project, the guy next to me had more bugs, so I was laid-off and he was not."


If being laid off isn't bad enough, finding continued employment is also difficult. "Everyone tries to advance to positions that aren't available and won't get," says Phil. While this may also be true for other careers within the games industry, he believes this problem is compounded because testers are often hired through a staffing company and not internally. Many publishers won't offer a reference because of contractor policies. Most testers are not, technically, employees.
Hi, I’m in my first semester in college now and I was thinking about going into gaming since I’ve been playing games for a long time since I can remember. I am thinking about changing my major into something like programming, but I never took a class in high school that was computer oriented and such. I was wondering do you think it would be a good idea to go ahead and change my major or not since I don’t really know about programming?
While the idea of working from home might seem appealing, most people actually prefer working in an office. You’ll learn much faster when you’re around other, more experienced testers. And it’s also a great way to build a community, and make a group of tester friends who will help each other out later on in your careers. Working from home can be extremely lonely, and people who work from home often don’t advance their careers as often as people who work in the office.
The Community Manager’s responsibilities support the organization’s established core programs, including events and new initiatives. The role also includes social listening and analytics to stay informed about industry trends and opportunities and direct engagement with key constituencies, including game developers and cause-oriented organizations.
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