Here, every day is different. Do you prefer a behind-the-scenes role? One at the front and center of the action? Or something in between? At Penn National Gaming, there’s a “fit” for just about anyone.  What began in the seventies as a single horseracing venue has grown to become one of the nation’s largest gaming companies. Penn National Gaming has properties in 18 states as well as Ontario, Canada. But as big as we are, we still feel like family. With company-wide managerial support, resources, and training, our employees can count on a positive experience no matter where they choose to work. What makes you happy? Imagine giving your all to a company and watching that same commitment come right back to you.
There are many basic skills and abilities that you will need for a career as a video game tester, but probably the most important attribute is a foundational experience with video games. You need to understand the top genres of games, know what makes for a good video game, and grasp the essentials of game play. Knowing video games, however, is just a start.

Many video gamers are also creatives – making this position all the more attractive to gamers. A Multimedia Artist is responsible for dreaming, designing, visualizing and creating graphics and animation for video games and other multimedia. This person is responsible for bringing the writers’ dreams to life on a screen, so you could say the job is pretty important.


Ok, I am 20 years old. I have been playing games before I could walk. (Literally, I was sitting on my dads lap clicking around and “playing” the best I could as a toddler, Starcraft lol) No one on my family is as passionate about gaming as I am. Its no addiction or unhealthy because I control my weight, take care of my eyes/lighting, and take breaks. I immerse myself into the game. Replying games in different ways, especially free roam/open world games, and role play even. I was told once, “There is a whole world out there man, stop sitting in there playing games” to which I replied that “I have seen more worlds and lived more lives in my games that you may never experiance.” I am always promoting games I enjoy and recommed them. I convince people to at least trt demos/trials or view videos at least to see. I get excited for new games, and saddened when I beat title/franchise I put years into. (Mass Effect is one) My question/comment whatever you may see this as, is this. I do not hardly know anything about computers. Coding and modding is beyond my skills. However I do tell people what ideas I would like to see implemented, what bugs there is at times, I can play a whole day away besides eating,sleeping, etc if time permits, and I have ideas of worlds, languages, characters, and more all in my head. That I thought up. Some may be based off of races/worlds/names of other things but never exact. But I am terrible at art. I can not draw. I have all these ideas and said if I could put them on paper or on a computer I could be rich and bring whole new life to games. I am scared to shoot for a testing job and work in college only to fail out use lack of computing skills and art skills. I have a vivid immagination. I can look around my home state and turn it futuristic ot post apocolyptic or alien without even closing my eyes. No exaggeration. Advice? Wisdom? Anything. I have often thought (sadly I might add) of getting rid of games and “growing up” like everyone tells me to, but I want to give back o other games and become a designer or dev even someday. But afraid to mess up. Should I go with a normal mundane job, or risk it? Help me out peeps, ima gamer, ima nerd, a trekkie/trekker, harry potter lover, lord of the rings follower, star wars fanboy. In essence, im your peer xD advice?
Many testing jobs are temporary, working only for the duration of a particular game. However, testing can lead to jobs in other areas of quality assurances. Many people start working as testers in hopes that testing will lead to a job in design or development – this does happen, but it's rare. Only the best and the luckiest make the leap from the testing trenches to other departments.
Today's teens—13 to 17-year-olds (Gen Z)—make up 27% of all gamers. One generation ahead of them are millennials (18 to 34-year-olds) who represent 29% of all gamers ("How Different Generations Play Video Games, From Platforms To Genres"). If you are a member of either of these generations, you may have thought, or even dreamt of, a career in the video game industry. Fortunately, there are many options from which to choose, both on the technical and business sides of this industry, that will take advantage of your passion for gaming.

I’m looking into becoming a game tester I live in Williams lake BC not sure how bout to do it I love video games and I do know most time game testings is for hugs and can be very tedious job writing reports more then game at times but its something I would love Tod do I don’t care bout the pay I just want to work for the company and the games not the pay the isnt essential for me my passion to make the games the best they can be is so any advice how to go bout this would be awesome
Compounding the physical and mental stresses that QA testers endure was the complete lack of job security. "During training, they told us it's not a matter of 'if' you'll be laid-off but 'when'," says Keith. "They flat-out tell you that what makes a good employee is the number of bugs you find and it is this number that will determine if you are kept on or not." This methodology, however, did not accurately take into account the quality of dedication that went into a project. "Here I was recreating and logging how to get stuck in the tail of a helicopter. I would have other testers comment on how much they liked my bugs, because I was one of those guys who would be able to reproduce those bugs that stumped everyone else, but when it came to the end of the project, the guy next to me had more bugs, so I was laid-off and he was not."
Many video gamers are also creatives – making this position all the more attractive to gamers. A Multimedia Artist is responsible for dreaming, designing, visualizing and creating graphics and animation for video games and other multimedia. This person is responsible for bringing the writers’ dreams to life on a screen, so you could say the job is pretty important.
A few companies offer college internships most do not, says Mencher. So, you must “create’ your own experience through game development projects, volunteering to be part of a MOD group or using the development tools that most game companies release with the games themselves. Want to work for Epic Games or a Game Developer using the Unreal engine? Go purchase the last game created with Unreal – and have fun using the tools provided.
Technically, you need to be at least the minimum working age in your country, state, or province. But practically, most game companies won’t hire people as testers until they turn 18 years old. If you’re not old enough yet, you can start preparing for your future job by following some of the advice listed elsewhere in this article, and listen to my podcast about getting a job in games.

Thank you for this informative site, i am a frustrated mother of an 8 year old. My son is only allowed to play video games during the weekend and on a non busy day he can play for 3-5 hours. In two 3 hour sessions he can clear a game. Is this Normal? I know every parent thinks their child is special, I am a realistic person, although he is adorable, I just don't know enough about games. We have x-box, PS3, WIi, DSI and PS2. I am sure I make most parents cringe but we let him play Call of Duty, Red Dead redemption, Modern Warfare, James Bond eagle eye, halo, Simpsons and ect. No matter the level he's done it just 2 days! He's been doing it since he was 4, so we have became pros a game renting since the challenge is a breeze. I don't think a game tester is place for an 8 year old, I just don't know if we should be trying improve a skill I find a tad annoying but something he is good at and enjoys doing. I am not game savvy, so clearly he doesn't get it from me, I just don't know how to challenge him or direct him for a possible gaming future!
While the idea of working from home might seem appealing, most people actually prefer working in an office. You’ll learn much faster when you’re around other, more experienced testers. And it’s also a great way to build a community, and make a group of tester friends who will help each other out later on in your careers. Working from home can be extremely lonely, and people who work from home often don’t advance their careers as often as people who work in the office.
Valve and Ubisoft may have internal testing teams, but most game studios do not keep a large number of testers on the payroll – instead, they hire outside game testing companies. I don’t know which contract firms they use, but Babble used to be a big one, and UTest/Applause is popular right now. You could start by looking at one of those companies.
Hi Kyler, your parents will want you (and rightly so) to pick a career that has more long-term growth potential, like Game Programmer or Game Artist. Think of Game Tester as a job that could help you start out in a video game career, but not something to do for your whole life. For example I started as a game tester, but then I took programming classes and eventually moved into a job at the same company as a game designer and programmer.

Here, every day is different. Do you prefer a behind-the-scenes role? One at the front and center of the action? Or something in between? At Penn National Gaming, there’s a “fit” for just about anyone.  What began in the seventies as a single horseracing venue has grown to become one of the nation’s largest gaming companies. Penn National Gaming has properties in 18 states as well as Ontario, Canada. But as big as we are, we still feel like family. With company-wide managerial support, resources, and training, our employees can count on a positive experience no matter where they choose to work. What makes you happy? Imagine giving your all to a company and watching that same commitment come right back to you.


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Though the industry doesn't pay well for entry-level positions, what about more seasoned QA testers? Danny says, "I work with a guy who has spent the last eight years keeping his nose clean, never in fights with leadership, does whatever is asked of him, and is a freaking QA Ninja when it comes to PC testing. After eight years, he is still paid $14 an hour. I just think we're worth a whole heck of a lot more than $10 an hour." He believes that game developers/publishers should "offer some benefits like they do the rest of the company".
First of all, a high-quality video game tester will have a strong knack for details. Gaming proficiency is required, but you’ll need to take it even further by spotting glitches that are so small the average player will never notice them. A good game tester will have to spot these tiny details and point them out to the developer. You can fully expect to be tested on details when interviewing for a game testing job.
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Hi Arun, most QA jobs are full-time jobs. But you could possibly learn programming and get a degree in the evening and weekends from schools that offer continuing education or adult-learning certificates. For example I learned programming and made my first game demo while I was a tester, and then I completed a 1-year game development certificate course while I was working full time as a game designer.
Getting a job as a game developer is like the Hail Mary of the industry. This is probably the first to pop up in Google when searching for video gaming jobs, but your opportunities might be limited. Jobs site Indeed indicated that the amount of game developer openings have dropped 65% since 2014 while searches for “game developer” have increased by 50%. That’s why getting your foot in the door with one of the jobs above is a great way to grow your network and learn the trade from the inside.
Hello, I’m 16 and I have been playing video games for as long as i can remember. I enjoy playing games for hours on end, I also enjoy finding bugs in games that are in closed Betas. I have found numerous bugs on League of legends PBE, Overwatch Open Beta, Even found a few on big name games like Halo and Call of duty. I have reported all of these bugs and have gotten them fixed because of me finding them. I do not even know how or where i would even start to pursue a career in this field.I am determined to get a job as a game tester because of my love for video games. I would highly appreciate if you could give me a rundown on where to start, What requirements i need, Where i need to go and a overall estimate on how much this would cost me. Thank you very much!
The Community Manager’s responsibilities support the organization’s established core programs, including events and new initiatives. The role also includes social listening and analytics to stay informed about industry trends and opportunities and direct engagement with key constituencies, including game developers and cause-oriented organizations.
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