Hello Jason W. Bay I was playing video games with my dad when I was around 6 months (I wasn’t very good at all) Like running to wall for hours and for days too. And you can see dad laughing. And soon I was getting good at it. So when I was 10 years old I was thinking for when I was 4. I want to be a Game Tester and my dad said to me “You can be anything you what you got to believe it inside yourself” So I believe for a every long time, Now I’m 17 years old and thinking for almost 13 or 12 years now.
While the idea of working from home might seem appealing, most people actually prefer working in an office. You’ll learn much faster when you’re around other, more experienced testers. And it’s also a great way to build a community, and make a group of tester friends who will help each other out later on in your careers. Working from home can be extremely lonely, and people who work from home often don’t advance their careers as often as people who work in the office.
I literally play x-box 360 from the time i wake up until around 2 in the morning, and i feel like video gaming is my passion. I am supposed to be looking for a job, and when someone looks for a job they look for one they have some background in. Well if there is one thing i have a vast background in its playing video games. So if someone out there is looking for a guy to test games for hours without interuptions please contact me at louielouie1991@yahoo.com Thank you!
- Hello, my name is Christian Bradley. I'll be your guide for this course on careers in the game industry. The video game industry has expanded to include AAA development studios, independent development teams, mobile app developers, and one man any studios. From the outside, each of these environments looks very different. This course is designed to help you understand the key skills that are common to all game development and how you can gain the experience you need to take your first steps in the industry. We'll talk about how game studios are structured, how games are financed and distributed, how programmers, artists, designers, and other professionals contribute to a game's design and development, and lastly, the specific skills that each of these professions require. So, if you're ready, let's take a look at careers in the game industry.

Well… All i do is gaming all i mostly ever wanted to do is game and it would be ARWSOME to be in the industry thats if there is one in New Zealand but if there is, i really want to just test game and do reports because i played games with a lot of bugs and i do make reports about them etc… But this is a job i would love to have!!! Sincerely – Harry Wilson McGill
Testing videos games is one of the most vital parts of the game development process. Game developers need people like you to test their games to make sure there are no glitches or problems with the gameplay, music, graphics and general workings of the game. These companies are investing millions in there games and can not afford to release a poor game. So don't "unvalue" your importance and worth as a game tester.
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1. Usually there’s a team of testers assigned to a game. They work together, but each one might be assigned a certain part of the game such as combat or AI, or it might be divided up by area such as level or character. Each tester submits their own bug reports, and then re-tests the bug once the development team has marked the bug as “fixed” in the next build.

Hi Mario, there actually are several game companies in Italy – check out this helpful list of Italian game studios at gamedevmap.com. If you eventually want to live abroad, you could start out at an Italian studio and then apply for jobs in a different country with more game dev opportunities (such as England or France) later on, after you get some professional experience.


The Quest for Your Career series can help. Each week, we’ll focus on one of nearly 30 jobs in the video game industry across several job families including art, design, programming, testing, production, and more. Each interview features an experienced industry veteran who tells all about what the job is, what it takes, and how you can start preparing right now.
I play games all day it is my own personal therapy and passion,I teach other gamers and explore all aspects of the game I am playing. I find all there is to do and secrets to find then move on to the next game. My question to you is how can I make a living doing this, I spend so much time and dedication playing games,I feel I should get paid! Please send me some guidelines to help me get started on this path. Thank you for your time.
I started this website because there’s very little information out there about how video game companies work on the inside, or how to get started in the industry. I’ve spent literally hundreds of hours, of my own personal time, to write dozens of articles to give you insight into making games as a career. And here they all are, all of them, for free. FOR FREE!
If I want a job as a game tester, do I NEED to show the company my college grades? I’m studying game design and going to graduate in 2019, but my grades in college are not as good as they were in high school (the reason for this is because I go to a British college and it wasn’t until recently that I discovered how rough and strict the grading system is here and my parents won’t let me drop out. I have to finish the degree). My grades here are ok but my high school grades are excellent. Can I just show my high school grades and games I’ve made in my free time and that’s it?
Hi Jacob, your first stop when looking for game studios in a given location should be GameDevMap.com. It’s a crowd-sourced list of studios. I can see that there are over a dozen developers and publishers there, but I don’t see any of the “giant” companies you mentioned – but that’s okay, because you don’t need to target the big, famous developers for your first job. Start wherever you can, build your experience, and then you can move elsewhere later on. Good luck!
I asked one of my friends who has run several QA groups over the years, and he’s heard good things about uTest. They provide a “crowdsourced” testing service, and he thinks that many of their QA employees work from home. But in general, if you want solid, full-time employment as a game tester, you won’t be able to work from home because nearly all game companies do not hire work-from-home testers. In fact, please be careful, because there are several scam websites that you need to watch out for. Learn more in my podcast about work from home testing scams. If it seems too good to be true… it is.
Hello Jason W. Bay I was playing video games with my dad when I was around 6 months (I wasn’t very good at all) Like running to wall for hours and for days too. And you can see dad laughing. And soon I was getting good at it. So when I was 10 years old I was thinking for when I was 4. I want to be a Game Tester and my dad said to me “You can be anything you what you got to believe it inside yourself” So I believe for a every long time, Now I’m 17 years old and thinking for almost 13 or 12 years now.
Hi Mario, there actually are several game companies in Italy – check out this helpful list of Italian game studios at gamedevmap.com. If you eventually want to live abroad, you could start out at an Italian studio and then apply for jobs in a different country with more game dev opportunities (such as England or France) later on, after you get some professional experience.

Thank you for this informative site, i am a frustrated mother of an 8 year old. My son is only allowed to play video games during the weekend and on a non busy day he can play for 3-5 hours. In two 3 hour sessions he can clear a game. Is this Normal? I know every parent thinks their child is special, I am a realistic person, although he is adorable, I just don't know enough about games. We have x-box, PS3, WIi, DSI and PS2. I am sure I make most parents cringe but we let him play Call of Duty, Red Dead redemption, Modern Warfare, James Bond eagle eye, halo, Simpsons and ect. No matter the level he's done it just 2 days! He's been doing it since he was 4, so we have became pros a game renting since the challenge is a breeze. I don't think a game tester is place for an 8 year old, I just don't know if we should be trying improve a skill I find a tad annoying but something he is good at and enjoys doing. I am not game savvy, so clearly he doesn't get it from me, I just don't know how to challenge him or direct him for a possible gaming future!


Whether it’s mobile games, social games, browser games, PC, console or online games – Games-Career.com gives you access to the best video game jobs. Our job portal brings you new listings every day in the fields of Art, Audio / Sound, Business Development, Community Management, Game Design / Level Design, IT, HR, Online Marketing / PR, Payment, Product Management, Producing, Programming, QA and Web Development. If you are working or looking for gaming jobs and are ready for your next career move, Games-Career.com is the platform for you. The same applies to students and new talents with an interest in computer and video games who want to break into the industry or gain professional experience in game development, production and marketing. Companies like Bigpoint, Gameforge, gamigo, Goodgame Studios, InnoGames, Namco Bandai, Aeria Games, Travian Games, wooga, XYRALITY, Daedalic and YAGER publish current game job openings on our portal. No matter whether you are searching for a community manager position in Madrid, game tester jobs in London, marketing or PR work in San Francisco, an IT assignment in Vancouver, or employment as a programmer in Paris, Games-Career.com is where you will find the perfect match. And if what you are looking for is a full- or part-time training position, internship, traineeship or placement as a working student in the games industry, you’ve come to the right place as well. Should your search of the listed game jobs not return the desired result, you can post your own job request free of charge complete with your CV and work samples. If you have any questions, feedback or suggestions, please get in touch with us at any time – we’re here to help.

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First of all, a high-quality video game tester will have a strong knack for details. Gaming proficiency is required, but you’ll need to take it even further by spotting glitches that are so small the average player will never notice them. A good game tester will have to spot these tiny details and point them out to the developer. You can fully expect to be tested on details when interviewing for a game testing job.
I recently got to “play test” a game for the first time. It was at an anime convention and they had a demo for it up and running. I found the game itself kind of slow and a little boring but when I clicked on the trees they would either disappear or, if they were dead, flicker back to life. I thought it was so cool that I immediately started looking for more bugs that the creator had missed, he was right at the table so it was easy to show it to him. I’m trying to choose a career with something I love and wanted to know more about this as an option. I’m interested in play testing but also in translation and programming. Those are all very different fields and I’m wondering what to expect from each one when it comes to jobs and requirements. If you could give me any insight it would be helpful.
hey, im 14 on the verge of being 15 and i extremly want a game testing job. ive been sending emails out to gaming sites and all i get back are links that give me no info or answers and no contact numbers. id realy appreciate it if i could get some help out with trying to get a job or contact anything realy that would help would be most appreciated thanks (email is jourdan.turner@gmail.com)

I started this website because there’s very little information out there about how video game companies work on the inside, or how to get started in the industry. I’ve spent literally hundreds of hours, of my own personal time, to write dozens of articles to give you insight into making games as a career. And here they all are, all of them, for free. FOR FREE!

Hi Satadala, I think you have enough experience to get a job as a game tester. So it’s hard to know why you have not been hired yet, you may just need to be persistent and keep applying. You should also try applying for smaller game studios, as EA/Ubisoft/Etc. likely receive hundreds of applications each week. You may have better luck with a smaller studio to start out.

I play games all day it is my own personal therapy and passion,I teach other gamers and explore all aspects of the game I am playing. I find all there is to do and secrets to find then move on to the next game. My question to you is how can I make a living doing this, I spend so much time and dedication playing games,I feel I should get paid! Please send me some guidelines to help me get started on this path. Thank you for your time.
Hi Evan, thanks for the questions. First of all, playtesting isn’t a full-time job, you might be thinking about the QA Tester job that’s described in this article. That is a full-time job, and most companies do not require a degree to do that job. Also, there are dozens (hundreds?) of game studios in the US, so I recommend you don’t limit yourself as to which one you’d work for when you first start out — you’ll have a lot to learn, and you can learn at most any game company.
Hi, I’m in my first semester in college now and I was thinking about going into gaming since I’ve been playing games for a long time since I can remember. I am thinking about changing my major into something like programming, but I never took a class in high school that was computer oriented and such. I was wondering do you think it would be a good idea to go ahead and change my major or not since I don’t really know about programming?
While this overwhelmingly looks like a gimmick, from your picture, Jason, to the e-book, this site has a lot of information and I hope it is true. I’ve done my homework and saw you were a part of Griptonite Games, which made largely handheld console games, which are based mostly on movies. Knowing this I am a bit skeptical because handheld games certainly can’t be as difficult to make as console games, and games based on movies are notorious for being bad. So how would you know about joining those big companies, or making “big” games? To be honest, I never heard of Griptonite Games until just now. Could you ease my skepticism here?
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