Cold Iron is seeking an experienced Console Gameplay Engineer to join our world class team on our next AAA title for consoles and PC! Are you a passionate game developer? Is making an awesome game the thing that gets you out of bed in the morning? We’re sure you’re amazing in your field, but do you see perfecting your skills as the means to making the best experiences possible? Great, we want to hear from you!

QA testing is generally considered an entry-level position in the game industry, and most companies do not require a college degree to be hired as a game tester. But if you do get a degree, then you’ll have a much better chance of moving into higher-paying jobs in QA/testing, or even moving into other areas of game development like art, design or programming — game jobs that almost always pay a lot more than a job as a tester. So if you want to have a career in the game industry and not just a job then it’s smart to get an education.
are there any places for these jobs in Canada, and for age complies would 17 work. I can honestly say I’ve played video games since I was around 3-4 since then I slowly went up in gaming. now I’m more into battlefield and call of duty or really any shooters. I have found bugs on my own and done a lot of the things you said that you would have to do as a game tester like writing a report, do you have to be good with code and things like that to make a job?.
It depends on whether you’re working as a part-time, full-time, or temporary worker. If you’re hired as a full-time employee, you’ll normally start accruing paid vacation time right away and can take vacation at any time, as long as it’s ok with your manager. If you’re hired as a temporary employee, then you usually would not get any paid vacation. Note that temp workers can still take vacation from time to time, but you won’t be paid for the time you’re away from work.
Over 40% of homes in the United States own video game consoles. Games like Super Mario Brothers, Halo, Wii Fit, Final Fantasy, Metroid, SSX, Grand Theft Auto, Shrek Forever After, and 1000s of others are being played for enjoyment and competition across the country. It takes a long time for these games to be designed, created, and debugged. No video game would ever make it to the store’s shelf it wasn’t for a video game tester.
The hardest part of this job is that most video game testers don’t get to pick the game they are testing. If you are a diehard Guitar Hero fan, it may be challenging to test for controller problems in the newest Hannah Montana game. Every tester must remember that video game testing is a job and even after long hours and sore eyes, you are still getting paid to play video games. And sometimes you live the dream, when you are paid for “testing” Mario Kart or beating Ninja Gaiden.
Hi Tyffani, you seem very passionate about games, that’s awesome! There are lots of different careers, so you need to figure out which one(s) might “click” with your interests and talents. You could start by finding out whether you are more attracted to art, or to programming, or design. Check out the Quest for Your Career articles to learn more about each one – once you find something that sounds interesting, then you can start thinking about how to pursue it. Have fun!

A video game company doesn't function like your typical workplace. Rather than working regular office hours throughout the year, the company goes into "crunch mode" as a game's release date approaches. Because release dates are inflexible – the company has to get the game out by Christmas, the television ad time has been purchased months in advance, and so on – if there's more work that needs to be done, everyone just has to work harder. Any video game tester can tell you that crunch time means long, long days, running on an intoxicating blend of caffeine, junk food and sleep deprivation.

Hi Arun, most QA jobs are full-time jobs. But you could possibly learn programming and get a degree in the evening and weekends from schools that offer continuing education or adult-learning certificates. For example I learned programming and made my first game demo while I was a tester, and then I completed a 1-year game development certificate course while I was working full time as a game designer.


Hi Ruben, it sounds like you’ve already started developing some of the skills you need to get a job testing – namely, learning about games, and learning how to find and report bugs. You do NOT have to pay anybody to get a job testing games – game testing is like any other job, you just need to find the jobs (start your search here), apply, and interview. If anybody tries to make you pay to find testing jobs, it’s probably a scam and should be avoided.
I’m looking into becoming a game tester I live in Williams lake BC not sure how bout to do it I love video games and I do know most time game testings is for hugs and can be very tedious job writing reports more then game at times but its something I would love Tod do I don’t care bout the pay I just want to work for the company and the games not the pay the isnt essential for me my passion to make the games the best they can be is so any advice how to go bout this would be awesome
Hi Fellow Gamer … did you know everyday Gaming companies pay big bucks to people like you and me just to know what we are thinking? It's true! They are desperate to understand how you think and shop and why you buy certain Games or Products because this helps their companies improve their products, and they in turn they pay YOU good money for your opinion. They Need You! Right now, I have hundreds of market research firms and game companies looking for video game testers, survey takers and beta testers. If you are looking for working full time, or want to make some extra cash, Gamingjobsonline.com is your ticket to fun, easy money.

Hello Jason W. Bay I was playing video games with my dad when I was around 6 months (I wasn’t very good at all) Like running to wall for hours and for days too. And you can see dad laughing. And soon I was getting good at it. So when I was 10 years old I was thinking for when I was 4. I want to be a Game Tester and my dad said to me “You can be anything you what you got to believe it inside yourself” So I believe for a every long time, Now I’m 17 years old and thinking for almost 13 or 12 years now.
Hi Jason, I seem to find myself in a predicament. Currently I am moving on to my senior year at Penn State and I need a new major. I was pursuing Computer Engineering, but programming and I do not get along very well (Once you go past “if” statements I’m Lost). So my first question is, what majors are good for entering the game industry, that don’t involve programming. My next question is about finding an entry-level position that I can learn on the job. I used your job search tool that you provided and most jobs seemed to require previous experience, any suggestions there?
Compounding the physical and mental stresses that QA testers endure was the complete lack of job security. "During training, they told us it's not a matter of 'if' you'll be laid-off but 'when'," says Keith. "They flat-out tell you that what makes a good employee is the number of bugs you find and it is this number that will determine if you are kept on or not." This methodology, however, did not accurately take into account the quality of dedication that went into a project. "Here I was recreating and logging how to get stuck in the tail of a helicopter. I would have other testers comment on how much they liked my bugs, because I was one of those guys who would be able to reproduce those bugs that stumped everyone else, but when it came to the end of the project, the guy next to me had more bugs, so I was laid-off and he was not."
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Hello! I’ve been playing video games for nearly all my life. I’ve put in so much time on gaming it’s crazy. But what do I do half the time I game? I find glitches. I’ve participated in private beta trials in nearly 6 PlayStation exclusive games and two other well-known games. I have also acquired the knowledge to use Microsoft Office programs proficiently, and I am studying game programming for the sake of learning how to better grasp the terminology and understanding of how a glitch is caused, and how it can be fixed. I’m only 17 and I am a junior in high school, however my dream is to become a QA Tester at Insomniac Games, the developers of Ratchet & Clank (which happens to be my favorite game franchise of all time). With the progress I’m making and these goals I have in mind, do you think they would accept me in the event I choose to apply for the job? Thanks for your input in advance. 🙂
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