Hi Tyffani, you seem very passionate about games, that’s awesome! There are lots of different careers, so you need to figure out which one(s) might “click” with your interests and talents. You could start by finding out whether you are more attracted to art, or to programming, or design. Check out the Quest for Your Career articles to learn more about each one – once you find something that sounds interesting, then you can start thinking about how to pursue it. Have fun!
Hi Nafis, if you already know how to program, then you should practice programming video games and start building a portfolio of small game demos. You can apply for game jobs just the same way you apply for any job: Search the Internet or game studio websites to find the job openings, read the requirements to see if you fit 80% of the requirements listed, and then follow the instructions to apply.
Game testers may also have to run through matrix testings. Matrix testing is often used in fighting games like Mortal Combat, Tekken, or Soul Calibur. Say a fighting game has 20 different characters and 20 different levels. When doing matrix testing, the video game tester would need to play as each character vs each character (including Character 1 vs Character 1) on all 20 levels. That’s 8,000 different matchups! That’s just one example of the highly-detailed, often monotonous work that video game testers have to do.
A video game company doesn't function like your typical workplace. Rather than working regular office hours throughout the year, the company goes into "crunch mode" as a game's release date approaches. Because release dates are inflexible – the company has to get the game out by Christmas, the television ad time has been purchased months in advance, and so on – if there's more work that needs to be done, everyone just has to work harder. Any video game tester can tell you that crunch time means long, long days, running on an intoxicating blend of caffeine, junk food and sleep deprivation.
While this overwhelmingly looks like a gimmick, from your picture, Jason, to the e-book, this site has a lot of information and I hope it is true. I’ve done my homework and saw you were a part of Griptonite Games, which made largely handheld console games, which are based mostly on movies. Knowing this I am a bit skeptical because handheld games certainly can’t be as difficult to make as console games, and games based on movies are notorious for being bad. So how would you know about joining those big companies, or making “big” games? To be honest, I never heard of Griptonite Games until just now. Could you ease my skepticism here?
HI, I noticed that most of you guys, if not all of you are adults. Well I am in 8th grade. I play video games whenever I can. Some days not at all, other up to 6 hrs. My dad doesn’t support my love for games at all. My mom isn’t as bad but still she wont be pleased, because I haven’t told them that I want to be a video game tester. I would like you guys to give me some about were I should go or what I should do to accomplish this. By the way I live in California by UC Irvine collage.
I know you’re just the author and may not have the exact answer I’m looking for,but I’m currently 16 and I play on PS4(mostly FPS,rpg,and anything in between),is there any other beta testing jobs available to me?Also the link where it allows your parents to apply a job application for their teen who is 16 and below doesn’t appear to work.Thanks in advance.
Thank you for the advice and knowledge on Game Testers. I am currently in college taking the Game Simulation and Development program. I’ve been studying this for about 2 years in college and got the basics down. How would I find a stepping stone for becoming a game play tester? I don’t want to try for big named companies and etc… I want to actually build a portfolio on testing games, Designing games, and programming games but I don’t know what to look for when finding something where I can give my first professional attempt to test a video game or project.
IGT believes in sustaining a workforce that reflects the diversity of the global customers and communities we serve, creating a fair and inclusive culture that enables all our employees to feel valued, respected and engaged. IGT is an equal opportunity employer. We provide equal opportunities without regard to sex, race, color, religion, age, national origin or ancestry, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, genetic information, gender identity or expression, and any other personal attributes protected by federal, state, or other laws.
I recently just asked on GameTesters.Net, about whether or not the testers get to keep the games or send them back, now i’ve been into gaming a lot, i’ve played many games ever since i was a kid, yes this goes way back from when i had Pokemon Stadium for the Nintendo 64, it was the very first system i ever had as a child, i don’t have it anymore, wish i did though, but anyways, this isn’t about a Gamer’s childhood or their very first game console, this is about bein paid, to be a Gamer, now i’d love to be paid just to play video games, it has been a dream of mine to be paid, just to play video games, i think that would be top notch, an awesome, plus it is something i enjoy doing, so if anyone can tell me how to land a job like this, just let me know in a reply.
Hi, my name is Danny, from Houston,Texas. I’m 16 on my sophomore year. I’ve been playing games since in my early childhood years. I currently have a ps3, ps4, and Touchscreen all in one computer (not good for gaming though). After graduating high school, I’m not really sure how to start being a video game tester. I have no skill, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn. Any tips to help me out?
It might surprise you to learn that strong writing and communication skills are essential for a good video game tester. The ability to write in a clear, brief, and effective manner will help you describe the glitches you find and how you found them. Your clear writing will give developers a clear path to addressing the issue and creating a fix. You don’t have to be a poetic, colorful author; you need to be a clear, concise, and detailed communicator.
HI, I noticed that most of you guys, if not all of you are adults. Well I am in 8th grade. I play video games whenever I can. Some days not at all, other up to 6 hrs. My dad doesn’t support my love for games at all. My mom isn’t as bad but still she wont be pleased, because I haven’t told them that I want to be a video game tester. I would like you guys to give me some about were I should go or what I should do to accomplish this. By the way I live in California by UC Irvine collage.
I love playing video games. But I’ve always wanted to know how the characters are made. I already went to college for game design, but because I couldn’t pass this one programming class, I ended up having to change my major. The art classes didn’t really help me much in understanding how to model a character. People have told me I’m pretty damn creative and I’m detail-oriented. I’m also very focused and love to write.

Valve and Ubisoft may have internal testing teams, but most game studios do not keep a large number of testers on the payroll – instead, they hire outside game testing companies. I don’t know which contract firms they use, but Babble used to be a big one, and UTest/Applause is popular right now. You could start by looking at one of those companies.
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I am interested in becoming a game tester. I am 21 years old and have done some college (not towards this profession) however, I have no desire to finish. I know you don’t need a college degree but, it is preferred. I don’t have a lot of knowledge when it comes to game design, programming, etc. and don’t mind taking a couple of classes to learn more about it because gaming is my passion. Are taking classes about game design and programming ok? Is there any other specific classes I’m supposed to take? Answering these questions would be greatly appreciated. I saw above from the other comments that you reply rather quickly which gave me the courage to right this. 🙂
First of all, a high-quality video game tester will have a strong knack for details. Gaming proficiency is required, but you’ll need to take it even further by spotting glitches that are so small the average player will never notice them. A good game tester will have to spot these tiny details and point them out to the developer. You can fully expect to be tested on details when interviewing for a game testing job.
ItemForge MMO Shop is looking for levelers and boosters. I will explain and provide everything you need to get started (guide, info, accounts) but it is up to you to learn basics (game mechanics). The more games you learn, the more jobs you will be eligible to get so I suggest learning minimum two. You should know at least one of them quite well already, otherwise you will need to learn it, which is unpaid during the first 6 months of cooperation. Longterm you are expected to improve your skills and knowledge in your free time (staying up to date with patches), but we will pay for your training when a new game is added to the shop. If you prove to be efficient and reliable, it will become a full time job. Duration: - It is a LONG-TERM project. (Note: Don't bother if expect to work 1 day/1 week/1 month) - It is a 5+ days a week job Requirements: - Long term (this job is for years - the game may change, but the players remain the same!) - Responsible & reliable - Ability to read (games change all the time, you need to stay up to date) - STABLE internet + PC able to handle the newest MMO games Offer below is for basic services (require only minimal game knowledge and average skills). If you are a very skilled gamer and can supply premium (top rating) boosts without my help (know-how and accounts) then please send me a list + price of services you can provide (any game, not just the ones we support right now). Always looking for: BOOSTER ($16-24 / day - about $450 a month) for boosting/multiboxing, who is online a lot (minimum 8h+ almost every day) to use 3rd party programs like Multiboxer, you should be tech savy (good at troubleshooting software etc.) You will be doing on demand live boosting (when customer is playing) or perform multibox leveling (which has a flexible schedule). You should have above average skills, good enough game knowledge and at least communicative English. POWER LEVELER ($8-12 / Day - about $250 a month) who can stream for menial jobs like leveling or grinding but also skilled quick jobs (typically x hours). You need a conversational English, above average skills/knowledge and should be online almost every day. You can outsource this job to your non-English speaking friends and earn on being a middle man but you still need a manager who will train them and coordinate the jobs. We also cooperate with teams (e.g. in gaming centers) who can provide many players and/or 24/7 leveling on the same PC (streaming isn't required if gamers are supervised). Power Leveling is all about manually playing online games on customer's account and achieving specific goals within set deadline. Playing manually means 100% by hand, you are not allowed (without my explicit case by case permission) to use or install anything beside the official game client. VPN Tunnel will be provided for you, you can't power level without it. Although many jobs allow you to have a flexible schedule, high availability is desired because sometimes you will have to be able to play during scheduled events like in the party, during specific fixed daily schedule. Only minimal game mechanics knowledge is required to start receiving jobs (100-200h /played). All jobs require you to be online but amount of attention needed varies from job to job, some only require you to play 10% of the time (leecher), others 100% (grind). Rate is calculated for average skill level (not a clicker or a keyboard turner). If you are very efficient and creative, you can complete some (but not all) of the jobs a few times faster or do 2-3 jobs at the same time. This means double or even triple hourly rate but it is very random so you need to be ok with the basic rate, even during jobs that take weeks to complete. Other than that, there is no advancement opportunity, your base rate will never increase (though you may still advance to a Booster). You are expected to play 8h a day, almost every day after you take the job (until you complete it). You will be paid a fixed price for average delivery time (deadlines are very fair), whenever you complete it in 50% or 150% of the time, you will still be paid the same amount (this way efficiency is encouraged). Need all of the following information in your offer (failing to provide a clear answer to any of them will most likely cause your application to be auto-declined): 1. Which position are you applying for, why that one? What kind of tasks do you think you will do? 2. Daily/Weekly availability (how many hours?) 3. Can you play without ping issues on servers located in Europe and America? (try D3 trial and make some levels on BOTH game modes) 4. Preferred long-term daily price (don't waste time asking for more than is offered) 5. PC/Internet specifications (can you stream?) 6. MMO accomplishments and/or gaming experience (only list impressive things that take thousands of hours) 7. Experience in online gaming services industry 8. English level 9. Cover letter (sell yourself!)
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