so iv loved gameing since i was little and i play about 40 hours a week. i just never get bored of them. the question i have is i want to become a tester first so i can get some feel for the gaming industries before i go ahead and start trying to do a degree in game design and programing. the closest school to me is art instutute of wasington. wich is acouple of hours away. the ting i want to know is im not that i cant draw all that well to be honest. how would that effect on getting a degree in this field.
Im a 13 year old lad who loves to play on xbox mainly but i also like to play on playstations and other game consoles. I have nearly every game that is an 18 or a 15 including call of duty:modern warfare,call of duty:world at war, call of duty:modern warfare 2, call of duty:black ops, call of duty:modern warfare 3 and battlefield 3 and others. Wel really i know im a bit young probably to work but i used to work for game as a game tester and they had to fire me cos they got sumone older to test the games. but just lookin for a new job so if u want to message me my email address is alexcrawf10@hotmail.co.uk
Diversity & Inclusion Students Inclusion Benefits News Find Your Career Data Privacy for Candidates linkedin twitter instagram youtube Browse Games Latest News Help Center EA Forums About Us Careers United States United Kingdom Australia France Deutschland Italia 日本 Polska Brasil Россия España Ceska Republika Canada (En) Canada (Fr) Danmark Suomi Mexico Nederland Norge Sverige Korean 中国 Legal Online Service Updates User Agreement Privacy & Cookie Policy (Your Privacy Rights)
Hey! My name is Gloria and I'm 16. I am not exactly interested in video game beta testing. I'm more interested in like IMVU or Second life; Virtual worlds and such. I'm also interested in different types of software like music production, videography, photography and graphic design as well as art studio software and ect. I was wondering if you guys could help. I have been looking everywhere!
Few people understand that not all jobs are highly technical. Video and computer games companies are in dire need of programmers, engineers, animators, and other “technically inclined” people – but they also need administrators, marketing and sales staff, recruiters, and more. Find all kinds of jobs from the top employers in the JobMonkey Job Center.
Over 40% of homes in the United States own video game consoles. Games like Super Mario Brothers, Halo, Wii Fit, Final Fantasy, Metroid, SSX, Grand Theft Auto, Shrek Forever After, and 1000s of others are being played for enjoyment and competition across the country. It takes a long time for these games to be designed, created, and debugged. No video game would ever make it to the store’s shelf it wasn’t for a video game tester.
Game testing can most definitely lead to other roles in the game industry.  A common complaint that I hear from candidates is that "I can't apply for this job because I haven't worked in the industry for x years" or "I can't get the experience because I can't get the job to start with".  Game testing is one of the few roles in the entire tech industry where you can get a chance without the years of experience behind you.  That being said, just because you are working as a game tester doesn't mean you're going to be a game designing in 5 years.  You need to continue learning new things and focus on skills and technologies that are relevant to the specific area in the industry you'd like to advance into.  Work on side projects with friends or co-workers that will allow you to continue learning new things, continue taking classes to keep your knowledge current.
The PENNY HOARDER℠, ℠, and  ℠ are service marks of Taylor Media Corp. Other marks contained on this website are the property of their respective owners. Taylor Media Corp. is not licensed by or affiliated with any third-party marks on its website and they do not endorse, authorize, or sponsor our content except as noted herein. Please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.
We are seeking the industry’s best to help us create, publish and support multiple AAA PC games being developed. Join us, and you’ll have the power of Twitch, AWS, and the entire Amazon ecosystem to shape the future of games. You will work alongside talented industry veterans, including key contributors from dozens of titles: League of Legends, Half Life 2, Left for Dead, Portal, Thief, System Shock 2, Age of Empires, Dawn Of War II, Halo, The Last of Us, Gears of War, The Sims, and Bioshock.
Maybe I am barking up the wrong tree, but I’ve reached a point in my life where I am grateful for any kind of advise. For the last three years, I have been attending college for a degree I didn’t even want. Long story short, parental figure says there is no demand for game designers/programmers, go into oil! In those three years I have accomplished only 2 years worth of credit in degree, a seething hatred for the Midwest, diagnosis in major depression disorder, a large debt for an unfinished degree and medical expenses, and academic probation for dropping below a 2.0. I have always been a very good student and earned mostly “A”s and “B”s, however over the last year, things have been going downhill in a spiral. I don’t want to explain everything but the end results. I am now taking a break from education to reevaluate my options while I try to find work to pay my hospital bills. My medical condition doesn’t allow me to work very laborious jobs, so finding an appropriate job in the small town that I live in has become nearly impossible. Upon searching for at-home work, which I suspected would be a dead end, I have stumbled upon this article of yours. I have aspired to be in the video game industry for years. I have done my own designing and free-time self teaching for years. I have written dialogue scripts, screenplays (mostly for animations, theatre classes, and my own amusement), and tried my hand out on 3D modeling, and rigging, and animation. I have even worked on table top mechanics for my own board game designs. These things are just what I can think of on the top of my head right now. My point is, I really enjoy nearly all aspects I have tinkered with regarding the topic. I play a fair amount of games as well. From card games to tabletop to video game. I have all these unfinished projects floating around my head, all these ideas I feel could be great. I used to have no free time to myself, and the free time I did find was usually spent lounging on my couch with a controller in my hand ignoring the increasing load of homework I didn’t know how to complete because rent required me to work that day instead of attend class. Now, after doctor visits and therapy sessions, I find myself with all free time and no idea what to do next. I have no health insurance, no job, and no degree. The time I spent working hard for a degree I didn’t want seems to be for nothing. I know I want to get into the game industry, one way or another, and I’ll be damned if I let someone else try to run my life again. So this is what I am asking. What can a debt riddled, determined, small town of Kenai, Alaska resident woman do to get into the game industry?
I have been gaming sencie I was six, I have played many consoles. This includes the nes,snes,n64,GameCube,Wii,ps1,ps2,ps3,Xbox,and xbox360. I have played so many games I have lost count. I have always wanted to be a tester full time. I have many questions though. The first is do you need to be a highschool graduate to be accepted for a job as a tester. What are good companies like Square Enix to work for, and where are they located. What abilitys do companies require their testers to be capable of doing.
If you don't have much work experience or previous testing experience, add a section to your resume towards the top that lists out your gaming experience at home.  Things to list include gamer scores, favorite game(s), platforms you own or play on, PC hardware knowledge, networking experience and any other technical skills that would be relevant to the game industry. There are a lot of particular skills we look for, but enthusiasm still matters.
During testing, the video game tester’s trained eye looks for problems that gamers will face. After a tester identifies a glitch, the problem must be written up and submitted to game designers to fix. This process can be challenging and it may mean replaying the same game of 2018 FIFA World Cup for 6 to 12 hours a day in a comfortable office. Repetition is the most exhausting part of video game testing.
Christian has been involved with PC, console, and online game development for the last twelve years as an environment artist and texture artist. He's worked on over 35 commercial video game titles for various formats, including PC, PS2, XBOX, and GBA. Before developing a freelance business of his own over seven years ago, Christian worked in-house at Interplay, The Dreamers Guild Studios, and The Collective Studios. While in-house or contracting, he worked on game titles such as Of Light and Darkness, Deep Space Nine, The Fallen, Unreal Tournament 2004, Unreal 2: The Awakening, and Battle Engine Aquila. Some of his clients include Activision, Interplay, Digital Extremes, Legend Entertainment, Codemasters, and Totally Games.

Copyright © 2018 HubPages Inc. and respective owners. Other product and company names shown may be trademarks of their respective owners. HubPages® is a registered Service Mark of HubPages, Inc. HubPages and Hubbers (authors) may earn revenue on this page based on affiliate relationships and advertisements with partners including Amazon, Google, and others.
Technical artists set up and maintain the art production workflow, as well as deciding which packages and tools a studio should use and investigating new technologies and techniques. They are the bridge between artists and programmers. They are employed by development studios, and as a specialised position, have pay rates higher than normal artists. 
Any travel that you may be required to do for work will be covered 100% by the company. They’ll pay for your flight and your hotel, and they’ll give you an allowance each day for food and other miscellaneous expenses. In general, business travel can be fun, and it’s a convenient way to see new cities. As a nice bonus, it also racks up your personal frequent flier miles.
We are a growing online gaming company and are currently looking for a part-time freelancer, to help with the research of our competitors. This will include following and documenting daily activities within these games. Requirements: - Have basic understanding and experience with Google docs/sheet/slides - Be available a few hours throughout the day - Have a computer and a mobile phone. less more
×