If being laid off isn't bad enough, finding continued employment is also difficult. "Everyone tries to advance to positions that aren't available and won't get," says Phil. While this may also be true for other careers within the games industry, he believes this problem is compounded because testers are often hired through a staffing company and not internally. Many publishers won't offer a reference because of contractor policies. Most testers are not, technically, employees.
You’ll never need to buy your own equipment, because the game company you work for will provide you with a computer, the game system(s), and any other hardware or software you might need to do your job. Often, you’ll be using a “dev kit” version of the game system, which is a specially-modified version of the hardware that allows developers to debug their games while they create them. Dev kits are often provided to game studios even before the hardware is announced to the public, so only official game studios — and you, if you have a job there — will have access to them.

The Community Manager’s responsibilities support the organization’s established core programs, including events and new initiatives. The role also includes social listening and analytics to stay informed about industry trends and opportunities and direct engagement with key constituencies, including game developers and cause-oriented organizations.
Hi Samin, your comment made me chuckle! If you could get paid to play games, then everybody would do that for sure. The fact is that game testing is a lot of work, and sometimes it’s not even very fun. You don’t get to just play the game, you have to search for bugs and write a report for each bug you find. Sometimes you could write 20 or more reports each day. Then when the dev team fixes the bug, you have to go into the game to make sure it’s really fixed, which can take a while.
The lead programmer manages the software engineering of a game, developing the technical specification and then delegating different elements. They usually compile technical documentation and ensure the quality, effectiveness and appropriateness of all the game code. They also manage the production of the different ‘builds’ of a game, ensuring that coding bugs are fixed, and making sure everything happens on schedule. The lead programmer must also provide support and guidance to the programming team, which can include specialism in games engine programming, graphics programming, gamesplay, physics, artificial intelligence (AI), tools development, networking and build engineering.
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: Polish (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia
Hi, I’m in my first semester in college now and I was thinking about going into gaming since I’ve been playing games for a long time since I can remember. I am thinking about changing my major into something like programming, but I never took a class in high school that was computer oriented and such. I was wondering do you think it would be a good idea to go ahead and change my major or not since I don’t really know about programming?
The Quest for Your Career series can help. Each week, we’ll focus on one of nearly 30 jobs in the video game industry across several job families including art, design, programming, testing, production, and more. Each interview features an experienced industry veteran who tells all about what the job is, what it takes, and how you can start preparing right now.
While this overwhelmingly looks like a gimmick, from your picture, Jason, to the e-book, this site has a lot of information and I hope it is true. I’ve done my homework and saw you were a part of Griptonite Games, which made largely handheld console games, which are based mostly on movies. Knowing this I am a bit skeptical because handheld games certainly can’t be as difficult to make as console games, and games based on movies are notorious for being bad. So how would you know about joining those big companies, or making “big” games? To be honest, I never heard of Griptonite Games until just now. Could you ease my skepticism here?
Hello! I’ve been playing video games for nearly all my life. I’ve put in so much time on gaming it’s crazy. But what do I do half the time I game? I find glitches. I’ve participated in private beta trials in nearly 6 PlayStation exclusive games and two other well-known games. I have also acquired the knowledge to use Microsoft Office programs proficiently, and I am studying game programming for the sake of learning how to better grasp the terminology and understanding of how a glitch is caused, and how it can be fixed. I’m only 17 and I am a junior in high school, however my dream is to become a QA Tester at Insomniac Games, the developers of Ratchet & Clank (which happens to be my favorite game franchise of all time). With the progress I’m making and these goals I have in mind, do you think they would accept me in the event I choose to apply for the job? Thanks for your input in advance. 🙂
I’m afraid I can’t help with financial advice. But as far as your game design goals, I think it will be hard to start a career in games in Alaska, because there aren’t any game studios up there that I know of. The closest US city with a strong game industry would be Seattle, so one strategy might be to move to Seattle and get a non-game job while you pursue a video game design certificate or degree. But you’d want to be sure that your health and finances are in order before making such a move. Be smart about it.
Hello! I know this is from a few years ago, but I see you still answer peoples inquires, thanks so much for that! I only have one question, what are the reports on bugs like? Is there a format that you need to use, and do many of the reports look similar if the bug is similar? For instance, if you glitch through the floor in a building, but also in another town over of a game, would that be two different reports written the same, except for location? And how long are the reports typically? I’m actually about to buy your book in a few minutes so sorry if you address this within it, but thought I’d just get a jump start and ask here. Thank you!
Do you find that extra hour, no matter your day, to squeeze in one more game? Do you lose yourself in interactive worlds? When you’re not playing games, are you strategizing ways to increase your win rate or solve that final puzzle? If yes, you’re a gamer. Whatever you play, if you make time to play, you’re a gamer. We believe that when you bring a passion for gaming, you’ll be able to empathize with player joy and player pain to help us make better, player-focused decisions.
Hello Jason, I’ve played games since I was around five years old. I always loved the call of duty series, mostly since it was the most gyroscopically advanced of most games. I have a great eye for detail like in call of duty world at war one guy stands in corner while jumping other guy crawls under him (figured this out with my best friend) crawl guy stands up while under jump guy glitches to where if u don’t move you’re invincible. Played it right when it came out heck I’m thirteen and I’m more intelligent than most people I mean I’m spelling college vocabulary over here and I’m in the seventh grade. I believe that the game is a part of me emotionally attached yet somewhat physically as well I believe that the game becomes part of my life my story! I would love to be a video game tester not for the pay but the experience. Thank you for your time, sir.
Hi I just wanted to say I know gaming world is not easy but work job isnt I love playing game I love writing I love find patches in every game I play and I usually not that easy… but I tend to have fun with it im not going to say im the best or anything like that but im pretty good at what I do im barely 18 and I love to work . Ive always wanted to a game taster but never really understood how to do so … but I have a few questions on how everything works but I am a hard worker and fun to know and talk to … it hard to work away from home because im a single father of a one year old and I’d to work from home so I could raise him and work at the same time … what would be a good way for me to get into the gaming industry?
Available Positions at GameStop: Game Advisor, Accessory Associate, Key Holder, Assistant Manager, Store Manager, Customer Service Manager, Hardware Tech, Process Improvement Technician, Maintenance Associate, Refurb Trainer, Employee Relations Supervisor, Replenishment Driver, Inventory Control Supervisor, Lead Loss Prevention Agent, Loss Prevention Investigator, Multi-Unit Manager, District Manager
×