We Are Expanding!!  Part time Game Coordinators cum Roadshows Ambassadors Positions Up For Grabs!! No Sales Invoved!! Are you looking for something more challenging and meaningful? Have a passion for the educational industry? Love interacting with children? Be part of the team that develops Singaporean children into confident and eloquent Public Speakers!  We are looking for outgo ...
I know you’re just the author and may not have the exact answer I’m looking for,but I’m currently 16 and I play on PS4(mostly FPS,rpg,and anything in between),is there any other beta testing jobs available to me?Also the link where it allows your parents to apply a job application for their teen who is 16 and below doesn’t appear to work.Thanks in advance.
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria Languages: Polish (C1) + English (B2) OUR CLIENT Our client is a leading provider of multilingual player support, localization and testing services for the games industry. The company serves its clients in over 30 languages including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Our client unique multilingual delivery model offers “One Stop Shop” services. The client supports millions of players around the world every day! The gaming industry is not only booming, but it is also changing. Customer service is often a secondary concern for studios because development, design and launch of a game are the ones driving up the numbers. As a result, in terms of customer support gamers are often disappointed. Their high expectations are not met as studios still view players as commodity even though the need for customer support 24/7 is there and gamers don’t have the patience to wait when an issue arises. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Players respect other players, especially the ones that take the time to care! The player support teams need to know their stuff, speak the same language as the gamers, and have the empathy to drive amazing player support experiences. Also to maintain the games culture, gameplay is an important part of their job. In other words the player support team is given the time to play at work, how cool is that?! What we are looking for... REQUIREMENTS • Native level Polish; • Good understanding of English; • Ability to work in a team environment; • Ability to build trust with the customers; • Patient and empathetic; • Technical aptitude by gaming. Bonus Skills • Good knowledge of E-Sports; • Good troubleshooting skills and analytical thinking; • Good communication skills; OUR OFFER Our client believes the staff is their most important asset and therefore we take pride in finding the best, most talented and driven employees. Among the benefits of working with us* are: • salary much higher than the average Bulgarian wage; • accommodation in a hotel or apartment arranged by our client, for a period of up to 1 month, in the beginning of the employment; • support in finding an apartment afterwards; • all our employees receive also: 1) meal vouchers, per month for 8-hour working day; 2) additional health coverage; 3) free transportation for yearly and late shifts; • in our client offices they have: free gym, yoga, massage, corporate psychologist, healthy days/weeks. *You can check out the cost of living in Bulgaria in comparison to your own country through this tool: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sofia
Using concept art as reference, 3D modeling artists create the 3D objects, buildings and characters needed for a game. They can use a variety of software tools including Maya, Modo and Z-Brush. The technical constraints of the game must be kept in mind, for example, the poly count for each object and scene and the size of the textures for each 3D object.
very helpful article. i personally love breaking games and finding bugs. i just love to find those bugs that the developers/programmers didnt think of being possible or consider happening. just to find one and say “this is a game breaking bug, here is a way you could fix it” makes me happy because it might help keep another player from experiencing that bug and ruining there experience of the game. the mere fact that i sit playing games the first time through enjoying them and then going back and trying to break them for fun kind of qualifies me or places me in the area for QA game tester already but that doesnt mean much as i cant find anywhere to apply for such a job. i know minor programming and can give details on how to fix bugs in a way a programmer might understand better than the regular person testing the game without the knowledge. it’s just saddening for me that i have been searching for about 3 years now for somewhere to apply for this type of job. i truly have a passion for it, even though it’s considered a tedious job at times, i still love it.

I’ve always been interested in working at home doing something I enjoy ever sense I left the service. QA testing has always been a interest because of the detailed work and the ability to work on your own but with a common goal with thousands of others. The issue I’m having currently is that I’ve grown up casually gaming across all platforms and genres and I just don’t have the slightest idea on who I should talk to or where to send a resume. Any help would be extremely apreciated.
I am from India. I am 16 years old and am doing a Diploma in Computer Science and Technology. After completing my diploma, I would be doing B.Tech and then M.Tech in computer science. I am interested in gaming practically since I first started playing games. Game testing is not only a hobby for me but I am really passionate about this profession. Will my M.Tech degree be sufficient enough to get me a game testing job in a major game developing company like rockstar or ubisoft? If yes, then what would I exactly do after completing my M.Tech? I mean to say that where and how do I apply for this job?
Work at a company that has friendly, fun, nice people working there. You may be working very long hours for days or weeks before each game release, which will be much more enjoyable if the people you’re working with aren’t jerks. Research the studio on Glassdoor.com, and ask people who may have worked there in the past. Avoid companies that seem to be full of jerks.

started off as a picker then quickly made my way to fill Active/stocker which is filling empty slots. or replenish product in which need's to be picked and after that was done help assist in picking or packing. then moved replenishment driver/order picker and our team was in charge of supply all stock. to the pickers and fill Activator's also assisting - more... in special projects directed by the managers or supervisor. I was able to obtain perfect attendance award twice for being at work one hour prior to scheduled time.the work place was amazing the different culture and new people and different poin ... - less

There are many basic skills and abilities that you will need for a career as a video game tester, but probably the most important attribute is a foundational experience with video games. You need to understand the top genres of games, know what makes for a good video game, and grasp the essentials of game play. Knowing video games, however, is just a start.
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Hello! I know this is from a few years ago, but I see you still answer peoples inquires, thanks so much for that! I only have one question, what are the reports on bugs like? Is there a format that you need to use, and do many of the reports look similar if the bug is similar? For instance, if you glitch through the floor in a building, but also in another town over of a game, would that be two different reports written the same, except for location? And how long are the reports typically? I’m actually about to buy your book in a few minutes so sorry if you address this within it, but thought I’d just get a jump start and ask here. Thank you!

- Hello, my name is Christian Bradley. I'll be your guide for this course on careers in the game industry. The video game industry has expanded to include AAA development studios, independent development teams, mobile app developers, and one man any studios. From the outside, each of these environments looks very different. This course is designed to help you understand the key skills that are common to all game development and how you can gain the experience you need to take your first steps in the industry. We'll talk about how game studios are structured, how games are financed and distributed, how programmers, artists, designers, and other professionals contribute to a game's design and development, and lastly, the specific skills that each of these professions require. So, if you're ready, let's take a look at careers in the game industry.
I recently got to “play test” a game for the first time. It was at an anime convention and they had a demo for it up and running. I found the game itself kind of slow and a little boring but when I clicked on the trees they would either disappear or, if they were dead, flicker back to life. I thought it was so cool that I immediately started looking for more bugs that the creator had missed, he was right at the table so it was easy to show it to him. I’m trying to choose a career with something I love and wanted to know more about this as an option. I’m interested in play testing but also in translation and programming. Those are all very different fields and I’m wondering what to expect from each one when it comes to jobs and requirements. If you could give me any insight it would be helpful.
Hi Ruben, it sounds like you’ve already started developing some of the skills you need to get a job testing – namely, learning about games, and learning how to find and report bugs. You do NOT have to pay anybody to get a job testing games – game testing is like any other job, you just need to find the jobs (start your search here), apply, and interview. If anybody tries to make you pay to find testing jobs, it’s probably a scam and should be avoided.

Cold Iron is seeking an experienced Console Gameplay Engineer to join our world class team on our next AAA title for consoles and PC! Are you a passionate game developer? Is making an awesome game the thing that gets you out of bed in the morning? We’re sure you’re amazing in your field, but do you see perfecting your skills as the means to making the best experiences possible? Great, we want to hear from you!


I am very passionate about gaming and enjoy searching a game for bugs and glitches and would love to eventually get myself into the bigger gaming industry and see this as a great start. I’ve searched and searched for jobs in this field, but none are showing up. I live in the Atlanta, GA area and can’t find a single Game QA/Test job. What should I do?
Hi Brian, it’s great that you’re thinking of turning your love of games into a career. To get hired by a game studio, you need to have some skills that they’re looking for – usually either art, programming, design, or production. If you don’t have any of those skills then you might be able to get a job as a QA tester, but as you mentioned, you’d need to move to a city that has game studios.
I did a quick search on some game boards (the GICG job search, and Gamasutra jobs) and didn’t find any game testing jobs open in Michigan. However – according to gamedevmap.com, there are a few game studios in Michigan. So you might have some luck by reaching out to those studios via phone or email to find out whether they have in-house testing teams, or ask if they outsource to a local testing company you could get in touch with.

According to the Gamasutra Salary Survey of 2014, the online publication for Game Developer Magazine, the average salary for testers is about $54,833 annually. The same study found that testers with over three years of experience average roughly $48,426 a year. If you work for over six years, you can expect to reach an average of $62,885 a year, and those with a master’s degree earned on average $65,000.

I have been playing games on the pc all the way back to the commodore 360. and have been playing all of my life. I am now 44 years old I have 6 classes before I graduate with my BS/IT/WD, The whole reason I went back to school was because I like to game and I wanted to get a job as a gamer (tester) I don’t want to get into the development side or the design side I just want to play games and do bug reports. Every site I have looked at all they want to do is sell me a book on how to be a tester. I don’t have the $$ to buy a book or a “plan” any tips on where I might go from here?


There are many basic skills and abilities that you will need for a career as a video game tester, but probably the most important attribute is a foundational experience with video games. You need to understand the top genres of games, know what makes for a good video game, and grasp the essentials of game play. Knowing video games, however, is just a start.
We are a growing online gaming company and are currently looking for a part-time freelancer, to help with the research of our competitors. This will include following and documenting daily activities within these games. Requirements: - Have basic understanding and experience with Google docs/sheet/slides - Be available a few hours throughout the day - Have a computer and a mobile phone.
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